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October 01, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-01

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Tuesday, 4ctob.er 1, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

g'age Five

I

Tuesday~,Otoer1194TEMCGADAY

- mlw

Baez

at

Crisler:

Melancholy mood,

Student Laboratory Theatre' presents
A FREE AFTERNOON
OF THEATRE
scenes from
MURDER IN THE CATHEDRAL
by t. s. eliot
TILT (Formerly Untitled)
by joel schwartz

By STEPHEN HERSH
Joan Baez spent Friday eve-
ning at Crisler evoking bitter-
sweet melancholy in her songsI
about love and other related
subjects, pausing only to evokeI
depression with comments
about political repression in theI
Latin American countries she's
just finished touring.
Clad in red and white, Baez
seren'aded her 3,200-odd specta-
tors at Crisler in a voice that
has not lost its purity of the old
days. Lyric-wise, it was bas-
ically a blue evening. There
was a range from cynicism to
> r sadness in her renderings of
such songs of her own as "Love
Song to a Stranger" (Parts one
and two), and in her covering
f such songs as Kris Kristoffer-
son's "Help Me Make itt
Through the Night" and Dy-1
ian's "Love is Just a Four Let-
j ter Word".
OG G "Between songs, however, the
^.rr.:v.{ ..vr.......: :... o.F.::. ......^. .......>.. ,.:..........................:............::.:.:. ...^..... ........... .. . . . .~* ....~ ... ~. *. *.. . .
Sov iets see arnthe p

subject of heartsickness took a ists. She was relieved, she said,
back seat to the subject of po- to be playing a concert unmark-
litical violence. "In Argentina ed by the tension which grows
right now," Baez remarked, her of overt fascism. }
guitar strings still ringing with But the evening wasn't totally
the final chord of "Bessed Are", gloomy. Joan began the show
"there is a political assassina- with a couple of rhythm 'n'
tion every 18 hours." She then blues songs that she sang dur-
played a song written by a ing her high school days at her
Chilean folk singer dedicating it first public concert. She did an
to "political prisoners in Chile impression of Lily Tomlin's Ed-
and all over South America." ith Ann, mused about her re-
Baez solicited support from lationship with her son Gabriel,
the stage for Amnesty Interna- and talked about the behavior
tional, an organization she of 10-year-olds to two kids in
helped to found which is aimed the front row.
at pressuring Latin countries, "Every time I see a child,"
and countries all over the she remarked, "I know why I
world, into freeing political fight the way I fight, because
prisoners. She claims that the nobody has the right to take
group's efforts have resulted in the lives of those children."
the freeing of thousands of pri- She ended the concert on an

By GEORGE KRIMSKY. . . . . .
Associated Press Writer u
MOSCOW ') - Soviet ab-
stract artists finally succeeded k
in displaying their work at an
outdoor show attended by moret
than 5,000 persons, but most of
them think it will be the last -
exhibit of its kind.Y
The artists' first attempt to
show their work two weeks ago
was broken up by plainclothesr
police using bulldozers and wat-
er cannon. After widespread
foreign condemnation, the Mos-
cow city council gave official
sanction to an exhibit Sunday.
There were no uniformed po-
lice in sight this time, but
eight busloads of militiamen
were standing by a mile away.}
Under sunny skies; a cheerful
crowd wandered around Ismail
ovsky Park on the easterp out.
skirts of the cityfor four hours,
looking at paintings by 61 arw
tists.
Six were reported to be mem
bers of the official artists un
ion who took part even though
they had been warned by the
union to stay away. The others
were artists whose work does: A LITTLE GIRL peers at a pa
not conform with the realstic exhibit of unofficial art Sunday
style approved by the Commu-
nist party. ones and some mediocre ones,
"This is the first time I've but the most important fact is
exhibited publicly since 1963. that they are here in the first
and it will probably be the last place."
for a while," said Misha Cher- The crowd applauded some
nishev. artist when they explained
Many of the other artists their paintings.
agreed. But Yevgeny Ruhkin of "That's a hand, that's a leg,
Leningrad said he hoped ab- and that's a face," an artist
stract art shows in the spring named Marinburg explained.
and autumn would become a "What's a face?" a woman
regular feature of Moscow's cul- asked.
tural life. "Right here," Mariiburg re-
Ruhkin, who was arrested plied, pointing to a blob of red
when the previous show was paint.
broken up said he and others "What's the thought behind
prefer to regard that as "an askethis" an ashlderlyvskeptic
unfortunate misunderstanding. cializes in brightly colored cub-
Poet Yevgeny Vevtushenko ist paintings
turned up and said: "I see "Whatever you want it to be,"'
some good pictures, some bao said the artist.
LOVE IN LONDON A Chic menace a trois
SUNDAY, BLOODY SUNDAY
Directed by John Schlesinqer (MIDNIGHT COWBOY)
Bob Elkin, played by Murray Head, is a bi-sexual artist-
sculptor who cannot completely commit himself to either of
his two lovers-a 30-ish personnel consultant, played by
GLENDA JACKSON (two-timeAcademy Award winner
and a 50-ish homosexual doctor played by Peter Finch
An extremely fine film for the sophisticated with a bril-
liant and witty screenplay by Penelope Gilliat of THE
NEW YORKER.
TONIGHT-Tues., Oct.1 ONLY!-7& 9 p.m.-$1.25
the ann arbor film ..
THURSDAY EVENING-Michelangelo Antonioni's BLOW UP
NEXT TUESDAY-Francois Truffaut's THE WILD CHILD
t
Eastern Michigan University
PRESENTS
BACHMAN-TURNER
OVERDRIVE

s oners-.
Describing a meeting with a
Chilean man who, she said
would have been killed by the
junta had Amnesty Internation-
al succeeded in freeing him,
Baez noted, "After someone has
been tortured, there's a look inI
their eyes which never goes
away."
Baez emphasized her feeling
that violence is not a justified
tool for political change. She
remarked that the majority of
her audiences in South America
felt differently, owing to the
fact that most South American
concert-goers are extreme left-
Have a flair for
I ar~tistic wr' na
poetry, and music
or writing feature
stories a bo ut the
drama, dance, film
arts: Contact Arts
E d itoar, c/o The
Michigan Daily.
Ii

i optimistic note - by singing
John Lennon's "Imagine", and
coming back with "Let it Be"
as an encore.
Backstage after the perform-
ance, ata small press confer-
ence, Baez explained that' she
does not belong to the Save the
Whales organization which co-
sponsored thetconcert.t"I'm
very sympathetic with them,"
she explained, "but I'm not
here to save the whales."
MON.-T UES.
GEOFF
}MULDAUR
AND
HIS BAND
(formerly of the JIM
KWESKIN JUG BAND
& the PAUL BUTTER-
FIELD BLUES BAND)
2.50
1411 Rill $TT

i
I

AP Photo

AUDITIONS
for Children's Musical
"100 AKER WOOD,
(Winnie the Pooh)
Oct. 2-4 Wed., Thu., Fri.
7:30-9:30 U.A.C. Office
2nd fl. Michigan U.
for more info call
763-1 107 or 668-6729

inting labeled "Love and Peace" displayed at a Moscow park
SEXUA L ITY AND
PERSONAL GROWTH
Only a few places open in groups now forming.
Tuesday or Thursday-8 to 10:30 p.m.
FOR ALL UNDERGRADUATES
Sponsored by the Office of Ethics and Religion
Call 764-7442 for information
1974's MOST HILARIOUS
WILDEST MOVIE IS HERE!
"May be the funniest movie of the
year. Rush to see it!" --Minneapolis tribune
"A smashing, triumphant satire'
-Seatte Post Intelngencer
"Riotously, excruciatingly funny:'
-Milwaukee Sentinel
"Consistently hilarious and
brilliant.' - Ba more Daiy Record
"Insanely funny, outrageous and
irreveren:-" -Bruce WA V-on-PL AYBOYMAGAZINE

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It's no joke, really. The university

Theatre Programs

is offerng

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book of ten tickets for just ten dol-

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lars. The book entitles you to see
whatever show you wish, and sit in
whatever seat you can get at the
time you exchange each coupon for
a ticket. The coupons Can be used
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EACH BOOK CAN BE USED FOR THE FOLLOWING POWER CENTER SHOWS:
OCT. 9-12-Edmond Rostand's 'CYRANO DE BERGERAC'
NOV. 21-30-Wi. Shakespeare' ' PERICLES'
FEB. 5-Donald Hall's NEW PLAY
APRIL 16-19-Aristophanes' 'THE B IRDS'
The book can also be used for the University Theatre Showcase: The Killing of Sister George, Oct.

21-23; Tht Red Lantern, Nov. 13-16; The Real Inspector Hound, Jan.
coin, Feb. 19-22; No Place to Be Somebody, Mar. 26-29.

19-21; The Last of Mrs. Lin-

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