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October 01, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Iuesouy, %r-u utr itu1 7uy 1 n-r

rage i riree

I

Spinola quits
as president
of Portugal
LISBON (Reuter) - President Antonio De Spinola, the monocl-
ed ex-cavalryman whose ideas for a new deal in Portugal's Afri-
can territories swept him to power five months ago, resigned
yesterday and warned of anarchy and impending chaos.
The embittered Spinola, was replaced as president by the
armed forces chief of staff, General Francisco Da Costo Gomes,
60.
The ruling military junta said the outgoing president -
who caused an upheaval in Portugal this year with his book
demanding a political rather than a military solution in Portu-
guese Africa - was "only a general now."
ANNOUNCING his resignation "al-n--_
on nationwide television, Gen-
eral Spinola claimed that "re-
volutionary structures" w e r e
being planned for Portugal.
He declared that his loyalty s
to the ideals of freedom and
democracy prevented him from i
having anything to do with

THE WAR CONTINUES

I

Teach-in on the Paris Peace Accords
and Continuing War in Indochina
Many students and faculty have ogreed to focus one or more of their class
work each week to a teach-in as part of the international week. We urge
all members of the community to participate in the discussions of concern
focusing on the fate of political prisoners and war resisters that will be
taking place. Presented below is a partial list of some of the activities
that will be taking place to which you are invited.

DISCUSSION AND FILMS

A Question of Torture
The Post War War

Wednesday,'3:00 p.m. MLB Aud. 3
Thursday, 3:00 p.m. MLB Aud. 3
Wednesday night, 8:30 Klein
Lounge, Alice Lloyd

SPECIAL PRESENTATION by JOHN WHITMORE (Professor of History) in
Prof. Richard Park's "Problems of Political Develpment" Wed., 25 Angell
Hall

AP Photo
Sousaphone Somnambulist
Eric Dieterich of the University of Toledo marching band decides that while music may
not be a bed of roses, a bed of tubas will do in a pinch.
CITED UPROAR:
Nixon offer d to
return Ford pardon

them.
General Costa Gomes' first
act as president was to reap-
point the radical Brigadier Vas-
co Goncalves as prime minister,
thus confirming a massive vic-l
tarv fr the left-

WASHINGTON (UPI) - For-
mer President Richard Nixon of-
fered to return his pardon in a
telephone conversation with
President Ford but Ford did not
take it seriously, a White House
spokesman said yesterday.
Press Secretary Ron Nessen
also told reporters that Ford
thinks the pardon he gave to his
predecessor "was the right
course and he did it because of
his conscience and convic-
tions." Ford has said that he

did not expect the uproar thatj
the pardon brought.
NISSEN said that in a tele-I
phone call to Ford on Aug. 17,1
Nixon made a "passing refer-
ence" to the public reaction,
and offered to return the par-'
don.
Nessen said that he could not1
quote directly from the conver-
sation but Nixon told Ford in
effect "I'm sorry for the trou-
ble that this has cost you. I'lla

send the pardon back if this
will help."
Ford's response, Nessen said,
was along the lines of "No,
that's not necessary."
Nessen said that Ford consid-
ered it only a "polite gesture
casual and not any form of
legal offer. The President does
not consider it a serious offer
to return the pardon."
ASKED WHY not, he replied
that the manner, the timing and
the way it came up in the con-
versation made Ford believe
that it was not a serious ges-
ture.
Nessen also said Ford has
not decided whether he will
comply with a request by a
House Judiciary subcommittee
to provide a fuller explanation
of why he gave Nixon the par-
don and also to permit counsel
Philip Buchen or another White
House aide to testify on the
subject.

Wry W-UC11. ,
GENERAL SPINOLA'S resig-
nation came after a widening
rift between his own conserva-
tive ideas and those of the left-
wing young officers who car-
ried out last April's coup that
overthrew the rightwing regime
of Prime Minister Marcello
Caetano.
The crisis came to a head this
weekend, when General Spinola
Ibowed to leftwing pressure and i
called off a scheduled m a s s
rally by his supporters - the
so-called "silent majority" in
order to avoid the possibility
of civil war.
General Spinola said in his
resignation speech to the rna-
tion: "The peace, progress and
welfare of the nation are being
compromised by the economic
crisis to which we are fast
heading."
HE CLAIMED that drisions
were being taken incompetently
and without legitimate nowers.
General Spinola also attack-
ed the policy of rapid decoloni-'
zation of Portugal's African ter-
ritories, which he helped to
instigate, but has viewed with
increasing obvious reluctance.
General Costa Gomes is an old
friend of General Spinola. Both
were dismissed from their top
military posts just before the
April coup because of their open
opposition to the old Caetano re-
gime.

I

decline
WASHINGTON sM--Prices of
raw farm products dropped two
percent from Aug. 15 to Sept.
15, the first decline since last
spring, the Agriculture Depart-
ment said yesterday.
The decline ended a mid-year
gain in the farm price index
which began with a six per cent
boost from June 15 to July 15.
The index rose three percent in
the month that ended Aug. 15.
PRIOR to the summer climb,
the index had dropped four con-
secutive months. Over the past
years the indicator has fluctu-
ated widely, due in part to de-
pressed livestock prices late
last winter and drought condi-
tions this summer.
As of Sept. 15, the report
said, farm prices averaged I
seven percent below a year ear-
lier.
Although erratic, farm prices
frequently are reflected in
wholesale prices later. The Bu-
reau of Labor Statistics will
report on wholesale prices for
September on Oct. 10.
ADMINISTRATION
officials have warned that con-
sumer food prices will continue
to go up in 1975 although Agri-
culture Secretary Earl Butz has
predicted they will accelerate
at a much slower rate than dur-
ing the first part of the year.

For information concerning other presentations call
Rich Levy or Les Ross, 764-7548

I

I

tech Midnight Madness

ALSO DISCUSSIONS IN:

ECON 497, 102 Econ. BIdq.-Wed., 5:00 p.m.
WOMEN WORKERS, 48 Lane Halt-Thurs., 2:00 p.m.
MEDIA PERFORMANCE, 2402 Mason--Wed., 10:00 a.m.
U.S. FOREIGN POLICY, 126 E. Quad-Wed., 3:00 p.m.
AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES, 2402 Mason-Wed., 9:00 a.m.
COMPARATIVE POLITICS, 2445 Mason-Wed., 10:00 a.m.

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

SGIANT TAPE BLOWOUT!
ADVENT SALE

Day Calendar
Tuesday, October 1
WUOM: Live coverage, Sen. For.,
Rels. Com. hearings on Detente &
U. S. Rels. with communist coun-
tries with scheduled witness, Ofo.'
Meany, pres., AFL-CIO, 10 am. j
Values Seminar: E. Conf. Rm., 4th'

of biol., Harvard Univ., 1967 Nobel
winner for medine, "The True and
the Good," Hill Aud., 4 pm.
Physics & Astronomy: Low En-t
ergy Seminar: S. Shectman, "A New
Optical Multichannel Detector," 2038
Randall Lab, 4:15 pm.; Theory Sem-
inar: P. Federbush, "Stability of
Matter," 1041 Randall Lab, 4:15
pm.

fl., Rackham, noon. values Seminar: Faculty panel
Naval Arch., Marine Eng.: V. A. discussion, Wald lecture, TerranceI
Phelps, "A Survey of Oil Spill Con- Tice, moderator, Rackham Amph.,
tainment and Cleanup Methods," 8 pm.
311 W. Eng., 3:10 pm.
Great Lakes Research: Dora R. General Notices
Passino, Great Lakes Fisheries L Eninrin Placement: EmLaoy
"Do Chemical Contaminants Affect Engineehofrin placent:oEmloy I
Grea Laks Fsh?" GLD, Cnf.Tech, fields will be offered, Oct. 15,
Rm., NUB, 3:45 pm. 22, & 24 by Engineering Society of
Kelsey Museum, Classical Stu- Detroit; registration forms avail-
dies, History: James Wiseman, "Five able at CP&P, 3200 SAB.
Years of Excavation at Stobi, Mace-
donia, 1970-4," Acd. A. Angell, 4 sity Address: Pres. Fleming will
pm. give his annual address to faculty
Architecture: Wm. Muschenheim, &staff, Monday, October 7, 8 p.m.
"The Architecture of India and in Rackham Lecture Hall. The meet-
Iran," 2104 Arch,, Urban Planning ing is open to all members of the
Bldg, N~Camps, 4pm.University community. The five Dis-
Bldg., N. Campus, 4 pm. tinguished Faculty Achievement
Values Seminar: Geo. Wald, Prof. Awards, the six Distinguished Serv-
ice Awards for Instructors, Asst.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY Professors, & Jr. Assoc. Professors,
and the Univ. Press Book Award
Volume LXXXV, No. 23 will be held in the League Ballroom
Tuesday, October 1, 1974 immediately following the meeting.
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transcendental meditation
C as tauqht by
} MAHARISH I
MAHESH YOGI
S"Provides deep rest
as a preparation for
dynamic activity"
Introductory Lecture:
TUES., OCT. 1-
r TON ITE 8 P.M.
V Michigan League
C 3rd floor, Room D
for additional information call 761-8255
-ANNOUNCEMENT- 41
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Interviews Tues.,
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The Nickel Beer
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with lunch at

WeWree Sisters
by Anton Chekhov
directed by Boris Tumarin
OCTOBER 17 THROUGH 20L
Love's Labour's Lost v
by William Shakespeare
directed by Gerald Freedman'".:
OCTOBER 2~4 THROUGH 27
by Christopher Marlowe
directed by Ellis Rabb
OCTOBER 31 THROUGH NOVEMBER 3

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