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September 29, 1974 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-29

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I

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September 29, 1974

Wolverines umble

upse
(Continued from Page 1) }
dies gave up after two futile
plays and quick-kicked the
Wolverines back to the Michi-
gan 33 yard line. But the Blue
offense took only nine plays to
march the 67 yards for its third
score.
FRANKLIN and Chapman
combined for the two biggest
plays in the drive, as the wing-
back circled around to take a
reverse for 15 yards, then got
clear for a perfect 18 yard toss.
End of third quarter: UCLA
42, Michigan State 14.
Bell sped through a huge hole
for the final three yards.
The Middie offense continued
to be stifled and punted to the
Michigan 47 after failing again
to gain a first down.
This time it looked like the
Wolverines might be content to
run it all the way to the end-
zone, but a clipping call set
them back. So Franklin rolled
left and found Chapman open
once again to make up more
than the lost yardage.
AFTER TWO line plunges,
Franklin again ran the option
left, this time pitching to Bell,
who made a superb move and

tmi
SUNDAY SP RTS
NIGHT EDITORS:
BILL STIEG FRED UPTON

then sped 25 yards down the
west sideline, dodging the last
diving tackler for yet another
Blue TD.
That score brought in the sec-
ond team for Michigan but
didn't end the scoring. Mark El-
zinga took over at quarterback
and hit tight end George Przy-
godski and split receiver Keith
Johnson over the middle to
move the ball from midfield to,
the Navy 14.-
But with only seven seconds
remaining Mike Lantry, who
had already contributed four
PAT's and several out-of-end-,
zone kickoffs, split the uprights
from 31 yards out to send his
team into the locker safely in
command, 31-0.

advantage in first downs.
The slaughter did not end,
though, after 13,000 bandsmen
performed during halftime.
Michigan boss Bo Schembech-
ler put the first string back in
for a little more practice, and
fourteen more Wolverine points
soon appeared on the board.
The luckless Poirier quickly
found another way to give the
pigskin away after Navy took
the kick. After a good run
around his right end, a
vicious tackle from Don Dufek
made him fumble into the hands
of Michigan linebacker Steve
Strinko.
ONLY 27 yards from paydirt,
Michigan kept it on the ground
this time. Heater, Chapman and
Franklin all took their turns be-
fore Bell scooted the final two
for the touchdown.

avy
Poirier's generosity was bound-
less yesterday. Only four plays
later, another of his passes de-
flected high into the air and
was intercepted by reserve
Michigan linebacker Dave De-
vich, who was hauled down at
the Navy 29.
Franklin decided that he need-
ed only one play to cash in
this opportunity, and lofted an
alley-oop pass to split end Jim
Smith, who once again display-
ed his leaping talent by gather-
ing in the floating football in
the end zone, putting his team
on top 45-0.
At that point, less than half-
way into the third quarter, Bo
wisely turned merciful and pull-
ed most of his starters. The
rest of the game lapsed into a
practice session for both teams'
reserves.
Jiddies sunk!
SCORING PLAYS
MICHIGAN - Heater 1-yard run
(lantry kick)
"IctTr -AN -- Heater 3-yard run
(* ''~rvv kier)
1VVTrTu1_N - Bell 3-yard run
l mTTTGAN - Bell 25-yard run
T arv kick)
%TTTTW-AN- Lantry 31-yard FG
TrTCGAN - Bell 2-yard run
(V a",tr kirk)
STCTTTGAN - Smith 29-yard pass
frnm Franklin (Lantry kick)
MTCTcAN - Lytle 6-yard run
(T antry kick)
e0 0 00-- 0
ATTrIcrNAN 7 24 14 7-52

Daily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
MICHIGAN TAILBACK GORDON BELL (5) dives over a fleet of Midshipmen for his third touchdown of the day as quarter-
back Dennis Franklin (9) looks on. Wolverine runners had smooth sailing during most of the 52-0 rout, piling up 340 yards
and scoring six times. In addition, Franklin penetrated Navy's aerial radar, hitting five of six passes, including a 29-yard
scoring strike to Jim Smith.

THE
showed
edge in

HALFTIME statistics!
Michigan with a 269-61
total yards, and a 15-4

r

heads or tales
Marc Feldman __

BUCKEYES WIN AGAIN:
urdue stuns

I
r

No te

1-

'Upset Year. continues;
Michigan still safe

i
I
3

SHROUDED in a thick mist that only covers cemeteries late at
night in the movies, a certain tombstone can be deciphered'
by bookeis, bettors, and coaches of highly ranked college foot-
ball teams. On the stone rest the names of some of the most suc-
cessful teams in the country - Penn State, Notre Dame, Ne-
braska, Texas, LSU, UCLA and Southern Cal.
These giants of the gridiron have all plummeted to de-
feat at the hands of lesser rivals in the early weeks of what
promises to be the "Year of the Upset" in the college game. -
One of the perpetrators of the sleepless nights were the
usually mild-mannered Midshipmen of the Naval Academy, who1
shook up the balance of the power in the East by defeating Penn
State last week.
The rash of upsets and the general upheaval of the status
quo in college football had to have an effect on the Michigan
coaching staff, the players and the 104,232 folks who crowded their

By The Associated Press
SOUTH BEND, Ind.-Quarter-
back Mike Terrizzi, playing withI
a badly bruised shoulder, di-
rected unheralded Purdue to 24
first-quarter points and the
Boilermaker defense held off
second-ranked Notre Dame for
a 31-20 victory yesterday end-
ing the nation's longest college
football winning streak at 13j
games.j
A touchdown on a six-yard
run by halfback Mike Northing-
ton with 9:23 remaining follow-
ed an interception deep in NotreI
Dame territory by linebacker
Jim Wood sealed the upset for
the Boilermakers.
The Fighting Irish never re-
covered from a 24-0 first-
perioddeficit, themost points
ever scored in the opening
quarter against Notre Dame.
The Irish failed repeatedly

MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Illinois
Michigan State
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Purdue
Indiana
Iowa
Northwestern

Conference Games
W L T PF PA
1 0 0 24 7
1 0 0 34 19
1 0 0 16 0
1 0 0 41 7
1 0 0 28 14
0 1 0 19 34
0 1 0 14 28
0 1 0 0 16
0 1 0 7 24
0 1 0 7 41
This Week's Games

W
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
0

All
L
0
0
0
0
1
! 1
. 1
2
2
3

Games
T PF
0 107
0 113
0 78
0 60
0 70
0 70
1 52
0 57
0 28
0 17

Big Ten Standings

PA
7
38
26
7
58
71
55
64
61
139

BULLETIN
ANAHEIM ()-Nolan Ryan
had his fastball blazing last
night and pitched the third
no-hitter of his career, hurl-
ing the California Angels to
a 4-0 victory over the Min-
nesota Twins.
bach zipped the ball to Chrystal
in the center of the end zone
less than three minutes after
WashingtontStatemapparently
wrapped up an upset with an
80-yard touchdown drive for a
19-14 lead.
Gophers struggle
MINNEAPOLIS-Steve Gold-
berg's 34-yard field goal after,
a pass interception by corner-
bakGreg Engebos gave Min-
nesota a 9-7 intersectional foot-
ball victory yesterday over,
Texas Christian University.
Freshman quarterback Stevej
Olsen plunged from the one to
give Minnesota a 6-0 lead six
minutes into the second half.
Goldberg's extra point kick de-
flected off the upright.

)uTie
Fanuzzi passed for two touch-
downs and scored two more on
the ground as Kentucky held
off a late Indiana charge yes-
terday for a 28-22 football vic-
tory.
Behind 28-7 late in the third
quarter, Indiana drove 78
yards in 15 plays for a touch-
down with 11:26 left in tht-
game, and a 90-yard pass
play from Bob Cramer to
Trent Smock set up another
Hoosier score with 4:39 on
the clock.
Indiana drove to Kentucky's
29 wih 1:48 left in the game,
but was stopped there and Ken-
tucky played out the clock.
* * *
Wildcats tamed
LINCOLN, Neb. - With a
healthy Dave Humm at -he
helm, Nebraska's 10th-ranked
Cornhuskers pounded out a 49-7
victory over outclassed North-
western in a non-conference
football game yesterday.
Northwestern, 0-3, couldn't
score until the opening play of
the fourth quarter when rail-
back Rich Booth sapped a 48-
yard drive by plunging ever
from the one.

IY1i-
W'ater
Bell
Chanma n
Corbin
Fr~anklin
Richardson
Elzinga
King
Holland
Moore
C edd ja
Jackson
Cooper
Roban
Gilmore
Yeager
Bolesta
Poirier
Turner
Goodwin
Franklin
Ezinga
Poirier
Yeager
Roban

First downs
Rushing (att/yds)
Pais5ng (att/comp/int
Pasrinz yards
Pealties (no./lost)
Punting (no./avg.)

MICH NAVY
26 10
68-340 44-142
7-11-0 5-16-3
119 *50
3-0 4-3
6-60 2-30
5-38.6 8-38.9

RUSHING
MICHIGAN
att.
15
13
9
5
9
7
2
4
i
1
1
I
NAVY

yds.
101
61
57
51
41
20
13
11
2
1
0
-18

avg.
6.1
4.7
6.3
10.0
4.6
2.9
6.5
2.8
2.0
1.0
0.0
-18.0
3.7
2.7
8.0
3.8
2.4
3.0
2.6
3.0
1.0

10 T
9 2
3 2
5 i
5 U
4 1
6
1
1
PASSING
MICHIGAN
att. comp.i
6 5
5 2
NAVY
10 5
5 0
1 0
RECEIVING
MICHIGAN

37
25
19
12
12
9
3
1

MICHIGAN at Stanford
Ohio St. at Washington St.
California at Illinois
Notre Dame at Michigan St.
Missouri at Wisconsin

Minnesota
Purdue at

at Nebraska
Duke

int. yd.
0 85
0 18

way into Michigan Stadium yesterday. to capitalize on good fieldi
Right from the opening kickoff, Michigan's immunity to the position in the final three Badgers upset
upset appeared to be challenged. Rob Lytle mishandled Middie periods and were halted four BOULDER, Colo. - Fired-up
Steve Dykes' kickoff and the Wolverines were stopped cold on deep in Purdue territory. Colorado, which earlier blew a
the opening series. Terrizzi, a doubtful starter, 10-0 lead, bounced back behind
Freshman John Anderson came on to punt and managed to k was forced to leave the game the running of sophomore tail-
get off a wobbly 22-yarder that went out of bounds at the Michi- with 8:42 remaining in the back Billy Waddy to upset 11th
gan 41. On Navy's first play from scrimmage, quarterback Phil second quarter, with substitute ranked Wisconsin 24-21 in col-
Poirie hit Kvin ' Suiva fr seven, theMi to whati Mark Vitali taking over. lege football yesterday.
Poirier hit Kevin Sullivan for seven, moving the Middies to what * * Waddy, a sensation as a fresh-

West Virgina at Indiana
Iowa at Southern California
Oregon at Northwestern
Before the dramatic windup,
the Illini lost four of nine
fumbles and very nearly blew
the game on a holding penalty,
erasing Hollenbach's apparent
five-yard touchdown pass to
tight end Joe Smalzer with
41 nda l ftf

3
4
Q

50
0
0

no. yds.-
Chapman 2 36
K. Johnson 2 3ยข
J. Smith 1 29
Przygodski 1 16
Lytle 1 2
NAVY
Sullivan 1 7
Owens 2 25
Ameen 1 17
Cooper 1 1

long
18
18
29
1&
2

turned out to be their deepest penetration of the day at the 34.
Obviously from the final score of 52-0, nothing much went
right for Midshipmen after that, but the opening series was
enough to worry Bo Schembechler. "The way it started,"
said Bo to the assembled scribes after the game, "I thought
uh-oh, we're going to have a ' battle, but we got a lot of
breaks and a lot of easy TDs after that."
The magnitude of the score and Michigan's total domina-
tion of the statistics reflected a newly discovered concern for
Navy's chances this year as opposed to the recent past. Navy
is one of those games that Michigan fans attend solely to get
drunk and considering some of the lackluster performances by
the Wolverines, it seemed that the players had the same
thought in mind.
Last year, in Michigan's unentertaining 14-0 victory over the
Middies, both the players and the coaches were unprepared. Bo
commented that it was the worst game he ever coached.
However, Navy had lost to Penn State by the ghastly score
of 39-0 in 1973 and Michigan was coming off a big 47-10 romp
over Stanford. Although no one associated with the Michigan
team ever talks negatively about an opponent, they simply had
trouble getting the adrenelin flowing for the Middies.
In fact, even in the 46-0 rout three years ago, the Wol-
verines led but 7-0 at intermission.
A sense that Michigan could be next in the upset string
hit the Wolverines this week, and their inspired play reflect-
itr Co-centcin Dave Brown exnressed this feeling. "It had a
definite effect on us. They always come to play and that's
the rnulity of Navy's team - they never quit." Fellow
All-American and Co-cantnin Dennis Franklin echoed his
sentiments, saying. "We got up more this time."
As the game turned out, all the classic ingredients for the
basic Schembechler rout emerged soon after the initial sput-
tering. An intercention by defensive tackle Jeff Perlinger set in
the first score. Two more intercentions and a couple of fumble
re-overies were instrumental in other touchdowns. Michigan's
field nosition was so strong throughout the game that the
seven touchdown drives averaged but 42 yards.
On the other hand, with the exception of Navy's first posses-
sion, the Midies were constantly nenned back deep in their own
territory. Wolverine place kicker Mike Lantry had a lot to do
with that ns he boomed kickoff after kickoff deep into the end-
zone for toichbacks. Ironically, the only first half kick that

man, skirted left end from five
Buckeyes ramble yards out for the winning touch-
COLUMBUS-Tailback Archie down early in the fourth quar-
Griffin piled up 157 yards and ter. For the game, he carried
two touchdowns yesterday lead- 25 times for 151 yards.

ing top-ranked Ohio State to a
28-9 college football victory over
stubborn Southern Methodist.
It marked the 14th straight
game the 182-pound hometown
junior has surpassed 100 yards
rushing, only three contests)
short of the national record.
"We did not get better and
things will not get easier,"
said Woody Hayes, moments
after the game.
The Buckeyes outgained the
Mustangs by 403-337 total yards
and didn't wrap up an antici-
pated romp Saturday until the
fourth quarter.
Wingback Brian Baschnagel,
who has played in Griffin's
shadow the last two seasons,
also scored twice. The senior
from Pittsburgh rambled for
144 yards in just seven rushes.
Griffin, meanwhile, scored on
runs of 16 and 27 yards, and
carried the ball 24 times, thrill-
ing the second-largest ever Ohio
Stadium crowd of more than
87,000.

* * *
Hawkeyes blanked j
IOWA CITY-Nineteenth-rated
Penn State held Iowa without a
first down for three quarters
yesterday and reserve tailback
Dave Stutts ran for two touch-
downs as the Nittany Lions
scored a 27-0 intersectional foot-
ball victory.
Penn State, 2-1, dominated
throughout and never let Iowa
past its own 32 yard line until
early in the fourth quarter and
the game out of reach.
Illini edge
CHAMPAIGN - Quarterback
Jeff Hollenbach's 22-yard touch-
down pass to split end Jeff
Chrystal with 34 seconds left
yesterday gave butterfingered
Illinois a 21-19 intersectional
football victory over underdog
Washington State.

Iseconase ll.
jBut on the next play from Iniansa falters
Washington State's 22, Hollen- LEXINGTON, Ky. - M i k e
'M'ruggers
Esplit tw o r.::. ;.f
The Michigan Rugby Football
Club split a doubleheader with
Kalamazoo yesterday afternoon
on Palmer Field. The Blue
crunched the Kazoo ruggers 22-
12 while the Gold were blanked
8-0.
Michigan rolled up a 13-0 lead
at halftime which was seldom
threatened. The aggressive run-
ning of Michigan's Pete Meg-
locci, playing despite an an-
noying leg injury, set up two
first half trys while John Braun
added a conversion and a suc-
cessful penalty kick.
The Blue increased the lead to
19 on a number 8 break by
Alan Kett out of a five yard
scrum. Cleland Child closed
out the Blue rugger attack with
a 25 yard drop goal.

7
17
17
1

Major League Standings

SCORES
GRIDDE PICKS
Michigan 52, Navy 0
Illinois 21, Washington St. 19
Kentucky 28, Indiana 22
Penn St. 27, Iowa 0
Michigan St. at UCLA, inc.
Minnesota 9, Texas Christian 7
Nebraska 49, Northwestern 7
ohio St. 28, Southern Methodist 9
Purdue 31, Notre Dame 20
Colorado 24, Wisconsin 21
Missouri 9, Arizona St. 0
Grambling 14, Morgan St. 0
Slippery Rock 7, Edinboro St. 7
Miami (Fla.) at Tampa, inc.
Teas Tech 26, e a

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East

NATIONAL LEAGUE
East

BalItim ore
New York
Boston
Cleveland
Milwaukee
Detroit
Oakland
Texas
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City
California

w
87
87
83
75
75
71
west
89
82
81
78
77
64

L
71
72
75
83
84
87
70
75
77
79
82
94

Pct. GB
.551 -
.547 1
.525 4
.475 12
.472 121/2
.449 16
.560 -
.522 6
.513 71/
.497 10
.484 12
.405 24%

Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal
New York
Chicago
Los Angeles
Cincinnati
Atlanta
Houston
San Francisco
San Diego

w L
85 73
84 74
78 80
77 81
69 89
66 92
West
99 59
97 62
85 72
78 78
71 88
59 100

Pet. GB j
.538-
.494 7
.487 8
.437 16
.418 19
.627 -
.610 21/
.541 131t
.500 20 j
.447 281/4 I
.371 40h

Yesterday's Results
New York 9-9, Cleveland 3-7
ton 7 Detroi 2

Yesterday's Results
Pittsburgh 7, New York 3

?. . , x" f I rta

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