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September 27, 1974 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-27

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Friday, September 27, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Friday, September 27, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven
I

'U' MORALS STUDY:

Fleming opens 'Values Year'

Adviser predicts
10% price jump

F

(Continued from Page 1) humanities was correlated to
subject of "The True and the the recent tendency of those
Good." In November Michael disciplines to treat the subject
Maccabee, a psychoanalyst as- of values in non-judgemental
sociated with the Institute of: terms.
Policy Studies in Washington Bailey also said that there
will speak on his recent re- was a possibility of a major
search on the values and mor- survey of the ethical attitudes

size than $2,500.
"THE IDEA behind this is
that maybe textbooks or new!
courses will result from re-
search begun this year," Bailey
said.
Fleming echoed the theme ofI
longevity saying, "We hope this1

als of over 200 top industrial
executives. No further lecturers
or topics were announced yes-
terday.
The bi-monthly seminars,
which will include students, fac-
ulty, and staff, will deal with
what Prof. John Bailey, of theE
Near Eastern studies depart-
ment and chairman of the pro-
ject's coordinating committee,
called "the over-arching ques-
tions" confronting universities
today.
BAILEY said that the seminar
plans to investigate whether the
decline of student interest in the

of students. He did not elabor- is not just a one-time shot" and
ate. that it would have "some carry-
The mini-seminars will deal over impact."
with concrete issues such as the But the President noted that
nuances of the doctor-patient this was a "very sensitive;
and lawyer - client relation- area. One of the hallmarks of
ships, Bailey explained, adding a great university is that you,
that such studies would be "in- don't tell people what to think."I
terdisciplinary, or even inter- Nonetheless, he expressed hope
collegiate." that the colleges would use
The last part of the program their resources in the years
will be next April when grants ahead to get into this area." I
will be awarded for research THE IDEA for the project
proposals arising from the va- was originally voiced last Oc-.
rious examinations of values. tober 1 at the State of the Uni-
Of the $15,000 budget, some versity speech when Fleming
$10,000 will go for this purpose, said: "It will not be hard for
and no grant will be larger in all of us to pledge allegiance to

honesty, integrity, and ethical
standards. The difficulty lies in
how we demonstrate these val-
ues and how we incorporate
them in our educational pro-
grams."
Fleming later amplified these
remarks in his President's Wel-
come speech earlier this month
to the class of '78 at which time
he announced Wald's lecture.
At that time Fleming wondered
aloud whether the University
should remain ethically neutral
or should inject a viewpoint
in its teaching.
Yesterday he asked, "What
should we in the universities be
doing?" He mentioned the Wat-
ergate affair as the event
which "brought the subject
most forcefully to my atten-
tion." Fleming said the "most
troubling aspect of the thing
was the string of young peo-
ple, well-educated - yet en-
gaging in activities most of us
thought were improper."
Bailey also said yesterday
that other topics to be investi-
gated in the coming year in-

(Continued from Page 1)
the summit, as reporting gen-
eral agreement among presu m-
mit participants that wage rates
weretnot the principal cause of
Sinflation.
SEIDMAN warned, however,
"a wage-price spiral could be a
real problem if something is
not done soon," Nessen said.
The signal of a deteriorating
economy ahead came from the
Commerce Department's index
of leading indicators. Because
NEW YORK (P) - Atlantic
Records and Elektra-Asylum-
Nonesuch Records have merg-
ed.
The new company will be
called Atlantic-Elektra-Asylum
Records and will be headed
by Ahmet Ertegun, president of
Atlantic, and David G e f f e n,
lhairman of the other board.
They will be co-chairmen of the
new company.
And Motown Records will dis
tribute CTI-Kudu Records. This
is Motown's entry into the jazz
market and the first affiliation

the index is infected with the
same inflation which grips Fab
household budgets the problems
are likely to be even more
severe than predicted.
The Commerce Department
reported that the strongest pres-
sure on the index came from
slumping stock prices, which
sagged even further when the
news hit the market.9 r
"
Try"h
Daily
Classifieds-
~

$53

includes
from Windsor

antastic Travel Service
1-261-0070
ulous Toronto Weekend
OCTOBER 18, 19, 20

ound-trip rail

Royal York Hotel: 2 nights, 3 days
ontinental breakfast
Notel tax
bellman's gratuities
LIMITED SPACE

Milliken: On the campaign
trail in city, Ypsilanti

t-

1.

I'.-

(Continued from Page 1)
small subdivision in Ypsilanti
where the residents had been
eagerly awaiting the governor's:
visit for almost 24 hours.
'Sen. Bursley's people told
me last night the governor was
coming," said an elderly wo-:
man who had prepared for the1
special visit by plastering the1
wall of her house with Milliken-,
Bursley posters. "I can't tell
you how pleased I am - you
can always count on the people
out hers to vote Republican.";

Another elderly woman vow- some serious drawbacks which'
ed "never to wash my hand might negate it's effect.
again" after she and her hus- "If this proposal is approved,
band were warmly greeted by: we have no assurance that the'
the governor. savings would be passed on to
the consumer," Milliken as-'
MILLIKEN'S campaign tour serted. "It will also be neces-
was preceeded by a low - key sary to replace the more than
press conference during which $200 million in annual revenue
he answered a series of ques- loss with a different kind of'
tions relating to the ballot is- tax increase."
sues.
He said Proposal C - which THE GOVERNOR also em-j
would repeal sales tax on food phasized his support of current
and prescription drugs - has legislation to regulate state1
medical clinics - abortion fa-
cilities in particular.

clude: CTI has made with another la-
-the searh' fr tehnia bel in its four years of opera-
-the search' for technical
knowledge and its impact on thetn
scholarly and instructional ac-
tivities of faculty, on the intel-
lectual development of stu-
dents, on the University's ethi -
cal vision,
--the effects of the scholar's
underlying value assumptions in
defining and working on prob-
lems,
-the criteria used in data
collection and evaluation, and,
-the ethics of social inter-
vention by experts in communi-
ties, corporations, political un-
its, neighborhoods, and subcul- ?his tares.
tures. R

Iit .

-r-

T

C14l Ar4igan Dai1l;
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CIRCULATION - 764-0558
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THURSDAY at 5 p.m.
DEADLINE 2 days in advance by 3 p.m.
Friday at 3 p.m. for Tuesday's paper

I

I

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i

1~

R DT
TNRU THE

"I have ordained the Dept.
of Health, Licensing and Regu-
lations to determine the precise
conditions at these clinics and,
to take whatever actions is
necessary, including closing
them down," he said. "I realize'
this action may be challenged
in a court of law and I feel that
the permanent answer is ap-
proval of regulatory legisla-
tion."

Haove a flair for
artistic writing?
If you are interest-
-d en rev-ieig
or writing feature
stories about the
drama, dance, film
arts: Contact Arts
E di t or, c/o The
Michigan Daily.

$2.50 8:3O
FRI. SAT.
John Roberts
and
Tony Barrand
from ENGLAND
"Rowdy, boisterous,
higih enerpv and
always entertaininq."
NY. Times

'?"
~
?

BURSLEY HALL ENTERPRISES
PRESENTS
WOODY ALLEN'S
"PLAY IT AGAIN SAM"
SATURDAY, SEPT. 28

The Nickel Beer
is Back?
W'ith l~unch a't
Village Bell
iMonday-Friday
K 11:00a00 p.m.
C_________________/

MON. -TU ES.:
GEOFF
MULDAUR

oil

:
;L:_

I

;

~I
t .

F

IiI

Bursley W. Cafe.
9:00 P.M.

Admission $1I

must present U.M. ID for admission

A

SHABBAT SHOLOM
Friday, Sept. 27,
at HILLEL-1429 Hill St.
6:00 p.m.-Shabbos Circle
7:30 p.m.-Dinner
(please make reservations by 1 p.m. Fridoy)
9:00 p.m.-Oneg Shabbat at
HEBREW HOUSE, 800 Lincoln
Hi lel-663-4129

e

ARP
BASKIN
BONNARD
BUFFET
CEZANNE
CHAGALL
DALI
DAUMIER
DUFY
FRIEDLAENDER
GOYA
LAUTREC
LIBERMAN
M'ANET
MIRO
PICASSO
REDON
DilrvwLI i

ART
AUCTION
OIL PAINTINGS
ANTIQUE OILS
G94PH0ICS
PRESENTED BY
SUNDAY
SEPT. 29
EXHIBIT 1--3'OO
AUCTION 3'OO

STORE
FOR
Hooded
Sweatshirts
SU I

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