100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 22, 1974 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rage Six

PaeSi HE IFT AL

'Jui suuyr aCVtUj i ju :rz

THE WEEK IN REVIEW1

LOOKIG
ed the clericals as they enter'ed come convinced that one union
the Union building to cast votes will win." In the spirit of the
late last week, labor movement, leaders echoed
UAW won a strike settlement the unity pledge of one JAW
for clericals at Wayne State organizer - any union is bet-
University the week before, and ter than no union at all.

BCK

classroom instruction in
electronic music
the musac
Partial list of subjects covered during
our 12-week course:
" Sound properties and acoustical phenomena
" Electronic generation and modification of sound
" Theory and use of voltage--controlled equipment
" Tape recorder characteristics and operation
" Studio recording spllcing and mixing techniques
555 e. william 994-5404
CLASS STARTS WED., SEPT. 25

Tale of two unions
For the campus, the move-
ment to organize 3200 clerical
workers was a new and sophisti-
cated form of struggle. Unlike
last year', union uprising - the
Graduate Employes Organiza-
tion's successful move to repre-
sent some 2400 teaching fellows,
researchers, and staff assist-
ants - the latest battle is more,
a duel of unions than anything
else.
Two of the nation's strongest'
and most progressive labor or-
ganizations, the United Auto
Workers (UAW) and the Amer-
ican Federation of State, Coun-
ty, and Municipal Employes
(AFSCME), brought in their
biggest guns in preparation for
the clericals' vote, which ran
for three days last week and
will end tomorrow.
1ROM BOTH sides came an
extraordinary literature-and-
leaflet blitz on a campus that
eats leaflets for lunch. UAW

even dispatched Doug Fraser,
the tough, widely-respected vice'
president of the union's Chrysler
division, to exhort the Uni-
versity's secretaries and clerks.
AFSCME chided its opposi-
tion for trying to pull clerks and
typists into a union reputed to

brought its victory press con-
ference to Ann Arbor to make
a winning impression on work-
ers here. If AFSCME was the
right union for public employ-
es, it was argued, why h a d

The debate rose to a f i n a I sharp

pitch as

little mobs of button-stud-

ded workers from both sides lined
up and proselytized to the clericals
as they entered the Union building
to vote late last week.

The battle reflected larger
political forces: as G e o r g e
Meany leads the AFL-CIO ,nto
the conservative wing of t h e
Democratic Party, a half-dozen
liberal unions - among them
AFSCME and the auto workers
- are attempting to pr e s e n t
their moderate-to-progressive
coalition as the strongest force
in the party rank-and-file.
Within the liberal coalition,
AFSCME, a fast-growing young
union and old, staunch UAW
are vying for superiority.
But in the two unions' rush
for ascendency, it almost ap-
peared that the clerical workers
themselves weren't getting
much attention.
j"I have two children to feed
and I'm doing it on my own,"
stated Student Activities Build-
ing secretary Jane Gould, a
UAW worker. "Between the
University and AFSCME, I
could probably do better on
ADC."
AFSCME's supporters, too,'
complained that the opposition
would cost too much in union
dues. But perhaps the most in-
teresting statement came from
a group called Concerned Sec-
retaries.

represent auto workers; UAW
boasted of a separate division
specifically representing cleri-
cals, and claimed AFSCME has
done a poor job for its people
at the bargaining table for
workers it already represents in
Ann Arbor.
The debate, which had lasted
all summer, rose to a final
sharp pitch as little mobs of

button-studded workers
bath sides p r o s e l y

frnm
t i z -

Wayne's people sought UAW's
help when push came to shove?
AFSCME supporters took a
blast at UAW for creating the
danger of splitting campus
workers' representation between
two unions - hence allegedly
giving the University a strong-
er bargaining position. AFS-
CME now represents 2400 serv-
ice workers here.
IN THE HOME stretch, organ-1
izers from both unions were
optimistic but conceded t h e
likelihood of a run-off if neither
UAW nor AFSCME gains more
than 50 per cent of the vote. The
clericals have a third option -
voting for no union at all
and if neither union gets a ma-
jority, a run-off election will be
scheduled.
The chances of a "no-linini"'
outcome looked minimal. "At
first I wasn't so sure," said Syl-
via Halorin of AFSCME, but
in the past few weeks I've be-

THANKSGIVING
AIRFARE ONLY
New York
(La Guardia) $82.27",
CHRISTMAS
AIRFARE ONLY
New York
(La Guardia) $82.27*
Dallas/Fort Worth
$119.27y e
Los Angeles
$249.27
San Francisco
249.277
London 5378.61*

CHRISTMAS
AIRFARE & LAND ACCOMMODATIONS
N ew rens
3208. O/5223.0O
Salt Lake City
$271 0,0/$281 .00
iSKI ING)
SPRING BREAK
AIRFARE ONLY
New York
(La Guardia) $82.27*
AIRFARE & LAND ACCOMMODIATIONS
Salt Lake City
$271 .O/ 281 00
(SKIING)
Mexico City
326 .OO/5295.OO

I
I
4
4

" A FSCME is not run demo-
cratically . . . the United
A"to Workers is not the proper
union to represent office per-
sonnel in an educational institu-
tion," the secretaries declared.
"We are a small group with
unique problems and what we
need, if anything, is a group
tailored to our special needs
. . . we urge you to express
vor individuality and vote
'neither' in this election."
It is impossible to dick a

i
.
t
1
i
t
I

REUTHER . . . After one PIERCE . . . a surprising
close fight, another looms. effort falls just short of vic-
tory.
trend out of the voting so far - getting solid financial back-
this is the first campus-wide ing from the party. He report-
clericals' unionizing election, edly has invited a bevy of
and there are no historical Democratic limelighters to pro-
yardstocks to measure interest mote his cause, including Ed-
and turnout, ward Kennedy, George McGov-
State officials will count the ern, and Hubert Humphrey.
ballots tomorrow night. But it will not be easy. While
* * * Esch's protracted failure to take
Reuther faces Esch a firm stand on Richard Nix-
on's impeachability will surely'
As the unions railed at e a c h cost him Ann Arbor votes, the
other and begged for votes, ano- state GOP sees his incumbency
ther politically-charged s h o w- as solid, Esch is considered a
down was just getting under- strong senatorial hopeful in
way. Handsome, well-funded, 1976.
well-named Democrat J o h n Reuther has another problem:
Reuther finally won the nomin- while his well-oiled primary
ation of the Second Congres- campaign rolled up expectable
sional district Aug. 6 Demo- labor votes in Livonia and the
cratic primary after a recount rest of the Second district's eas-
showed him leading Dr. Ed tern end, Pierce, a radical,
Pierce by at least 130 votes. walloped him by a near 5-1
Pierce conceded late Monday margin in Ann Arbor. During
night. the recount, the two men os-
Now comes the larger battle: tensibly ran a "joint campaign"
the nephew of late UAW leader against Esch, but they were
Walter Reuther will seek to rarely seen together. Reuther's
tumble the three-term incum- ability to roll up votes in Ann
bency of Congressman Marvin Arbor's liberal-radical campus
Esch, a moderate Ann Arbor community now becomes a crit-
Renublican. ical question.
As with the UAW-AFSCME WHEN PIERCE set out to
battle, Reuther's challenge is run in the primary, few
being watched from afar. Par- observers gave him much
ty workers say Democratic Na- chance of coming close to a
tional Committee's campaign heavyweight like Reuther. But
strategists are eager to see if the friendly, sincere-sounding
Reuther can forge the magical doctor got enough votes to make
student-labor compound into a the primary a dead heat. In
victory in this "swing" dis- ! the end, Reuther won by only a
trict. nose.

*ALL FARES SUBJECT TO CHANGE
For Further Information and Exact Departure Dates, Contact
UAC TRAVEL OFFICE Hours 11-5 M-F

SEXUALITY & PERSONAL GROWTH
A small group experience intended to increase personal
and inter-personal growth with regard to sexual ident-
ity, sexual preference, and sexual relationships. Explor-
ation and sharing about attitudes and behavior will be
encouraged. Semi-structured group experiences, and a
one-day intensive workshop using sexually explicit
audio-visuals will be part of the program. The groups
will have great flexibility in the course they finally take.
Two groups of 9 weekly sessions each will begin with
a PRELIMINARY MEETING for both groups on WEDNES-
DAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 25, AT 8 P.M. in the Office
of Ethics and Religion (third floor, Michigan Union).
Thereafter one group willmeet on Tuesday evenings,
the other group on Thursday evenings.
The groups are offered free of charge by the Office of
Ethics and Religion and are open to all UNDERGRAD-
UATES. Call Len Scott (764-7442) for your early prefer-
ence for a group. First come, first served. Then show
up at the preliminary meeting. 12 Participants and 2
leaders per group.

PHE YOUTHFUL Democrat is:

Ran RED SEAL
Todays greatest virtuosos of the guitar i I
in their first duet album
JOHN WILLIAMS JULIAN BREAM
Including
La Vida Breve: Spanish Dance No. 1
Goyescas: Intermezzo Pavan for a Dead Princess
'IC"
fiRST WESI[RN WORLDTO
Tfif! C HAIK()VSKY ViOLI
EUGENE F
Ran RED SEAL Tchaikovsky Ysa
Et~ RD SALWieniawski"P
C14Jonathan Feldm
London Philharmonic Orchestra
JOSE SEREBRIER.
$3.49 per d
Ran 2 RECORD SET RED SEAL
p A OHEME
C(ABALF
DOMINGO -MILNES
SEGEN -SAPRDINERO - RAIMONDI
GEORG 5011

-DAN BIDDLE

f
Seal Stea
ie.

RED SEAL
)P PRZE WINNEROF
)N COMPETITON
ODOR
Prokofieff
man, Pianist

i
1
I
d e.
1
r -
RED SEAL
Y
hia Orchestra
r
s
e

516 E. WILLIAM
Ann Arbor
Mon. - Fri. 11-6

2nd Floor
994-4954
Sat. 10-6
free trick

Mention this ad and receive a

_. .

d

79

4

k

Al

CUT YOUR SVUDY TIME

b

The i don'
remember
reader

ReII
TCHAIKOVSKY
Symphony No.4
Eugene Ormandv/The Philadelpi

Come In and See What
We've Got Up Our Sleeve
--NOW OPEN
Hank[ Mgoorehouses
- The Magic Emporium

' !3\

IN

I.

diisc !! !! !

.-
.
.: /"
i
f

HALF THIS SPRING!
At Tonight's Mini-Lesson you'll actually improve your reading efficiency,
both speed and comprehension, by using our techniques which have worked
for over 2 million people just like you. Whether you're a "Lazy Reader"
unable to concentrate, a "Word-at-a-time Reader" who spends days, weeks,
and months reading material that should take minutes and hours, a reader
who can't remember anything you read, or a "Skimmer," who reads fast but
retains little...we can help you. All the advantages of Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics will be explained and demonstrated completely at the FREE
Mini-Lesson. Stop wasting valuable time...you've got nothing to lose.
everything to gain!
Attend a free mini lessen
MONDAY, Sept. 23
TUESDAY, Sept. 24
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25
THURSDAY, Sept. 26
MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE
STUDENT DISCOUNTS
Howard Johnson's
Motor Lodge

I

I

RCA

2 RECORD SET RED SEAL

JFIEW'.h QDNCf2I
ci A /HT K)I i I.?

The word at
Stin reader.

TM tuy nsdor. j
2

No Rain Checks on this sol
fACTr (-JAKI(-P AT TL4IC Poc

, :_

I

I

m

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan