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September 19, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thuisddy, September 19, 1974

I HE IAICHiGhN UAILY

Page Five

Thursday, September 19, 1974 9age Five

Voice of'U'
booms rom
LSA rooftop
By ROSETTA SILVAGI
Elevate yourself some day to the top of the LSA
Building, the Fifth Floor Suite occupied by the WUOM
Staff. WUOM is not to be confused with WCBN, the
student broadcasting machinery located in the Student
Activities Building.
The University also operates another radio trans-
mitter - WUOM's satellite station, WVGR, in Grand
Rapids.
But the radio station in the LSA Building is big,
still a relic from the days of live radio broadcasts. There
are 4 sizable studios, 5 control areas, a music library, a
tape library, several offices, and a newsroom.
The small microwave transmitter on the top of the
building sends out the signal to the regular transmitter
northwest of Metropolitan Dexter, on Peach Mountain,
also where the University's radioscope is planted.
WUOM (at 91.7 Megahertz) emits 23,000 watts (or
units of effective radiated power), while WVGR (at
101.4 MHz) kicks out 107,500 watts. Anyway, it is big:
the signal covers all of Southern Michigan.
A member of NPR, National Public Radio, WUOM
carries network programs like "All Things Considered"
on weekdays from 5:00-6:30 pm. The station also pro-
grams classical music, jazz, lectures, live U-M football
games, and the Music School's Symphony and Chamber
Orchestra concerts.
WUOM publishes its own free Program Guide,
which you can pick up at the information desk in the
lobby of LSA. Or else if you feel lazy, have the Guide
sent to your lonely mailbox by putting yourself on the
mailing list.
The station studios and equipment can be rented
to anyone for stereo or monaural recordings for under
$20. BUT, you can use them only for educational or non-
commercial purposes. (Columbia studios, it ain't).

Songstress Cotton
heads Ark weekend

The .Ark offers a full weekend
of quiet, nonelectric music for
those looking for an alternative
to the pervasive electric music
that pervades Ann Arbor.
Heading the three-day musical
weekend will be legendary folk
songstress Elizabeth Cotton on
Friday and Saturday night.
Eighty-four years old and
still going strong, Libba Cotton
is one of the bedrocks of tra-
ditional folk music. Many of
her songs, such as "Shake,
Shake Sugaree" and "Freight
Train," have been recorded and
performed again and again by
folk musicians.
Born in 1890, Libba Cotton
was the housekeeper of folk
musicologist Charles Seeger of
the famous Seeger family. Prac-
ticing on a house guitar, she

learned to play backwards-that
is, with the guitar strung in the
normal manner and picking the
tenor strings with the thumb
and the bass strings with the
fingers.
On Sunday, Tracy Schwartz
of the New Lost City Ramblers
will take to the microphone for
an evening of country picking
and fiddling.
During his 11-year tenure with
the Ramblers, he has been
known for his wizardry on the
fiddle. Crowds have been known
to get up and dance when he
plays, and the Ark regrets that
its limited floor space does not
allow for square dancing.
All shows start at 9 p.m., and
admission is $2.50, which in-
cludes all the coffee, tea and
popcorn you can consume.

Non-dress rehearsal

Clearly it will take a first-class make-up job t o prepare guest actor William Leach (left) for
his title role in the University Theatre Program's production of Cyrano de Bergerac at the
Power Center next month. Leach, who will re quire a large plastic nose to augment his own
for the role, is shown rehearsing with Evan Jeffries.

0MUSKET 4>
AUDITIONS
for
JERICHO
A New Musical Comedy
CALL 763-1107

I'

Julie's debul

By FRANK SWERTLOW
UPI Television Writer
NEW YORK (UPI) - With a.
kiss of "good luck" from a di-'
rector, Julie Nixon Eisenhower
stepped into the bright lights of
television and became a tem-
porary -TV hostess.
The performance of former
President Nixon's younger
daughter as a novice substitute
for Barbara Walters.on the syn-
dicated TV series, Not for Wo-
men Only, was relaxed and in-!
triguing, but only for the first
half-hour segment.
The other four segments, were
too sanitized and failed to be
thought provoking, especially
since Eisenhower failed to re-'

veal her feelings about her sub-
ject: "Public People, Private
Lives."
Everyone on the show, which
switched guests as fast as Eis-'
enhower switched her w a r d-
robes, spoke- in bromides and
platitudes abort the conflicts
between the public and private
life of a celebrity.
However, Eisenhower, t h e
youngest daughter of former'
President Nixon, seemed con-
tent to dance around the sub-
ject. She would not tell us her,
sorrows or her joys.
There were some attractive'
moments about the performer.
She is pretty and personable
and does not flub her lines. And

although her questions were not
incisive, she did not let the show
falter or drag. However, one
of her guests, Rebecca A n n
King, last year's Miss Amer-
ica, seemed to take over the
show during the fourth s e g -
ment.
But Eisenhower's admirers
were pleased about her perform-
ance.
"I was impressed," said Rep.
Barry Goldwater Jr. (R-Calif.),
one of her guests for the first
segment. "She's always been:
the outgoing one in the family.
Similarly, Paul Freeman, the
director of all five shows that
were videotaped Tuesday, w a s
pleased at her debut.
"She picked up reasonably
well such complicated things
like time cues," he said. "She'sI
acting like a pro. She should
havesher own series." All five
shows will be aired the week
of Sept. 30 - Oct. 4.
At the start of the show, Mad-
eline Amgott, the producer, cau-
tioned the audience not to ask!
Eisenhower any questions about
Watergate.
"We are not trying to make
this a press conference," said
the producer.
Others on the panel besides
King and Rep. Goldwater, who
once dated her older sister,
Tricia, there was Mrs. Norman
Vincent Peale, the wife of the
minister who married the Eisen-
howers.
Also present was Dollie Cole,j
the wife of the president of
General Motors and a senior
editor of the Saturday Evening
Post magazine, which employs
Eisenhower as an editor.

'I

I

I

I.

A/so Sign Up for Crews & Inter-

- a

Views

for Central

Committee

i
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{(
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But if you're really feeling curious/yellow/bored/
all of the above, volunteer your valuable time for any
number of things that have to be done in a large sta-
tion: distribution of the Guide, promotion and adver-
tising, jazz cataloguing.
Come upstairs and meet the inscrutable radio per-
sonalities locked away on the 5th Floor: Man of Sports
Tom Hemmingway, Sports Director, who brings you
those home football games; or ferocious Fred Hind-
ley, the News Director and resident Walrus who brings
you the Noon Show; or the Greek Whirlwind, Evans
Mirageas, old CBN-Man, and now host of "Music of the
Masters."
WUOM is a big operation, but there's always room
for sincere, competent help. For those of you who want
to delve more into the Broadcasting Business, volunteer
in person, or call 764-9210. Ask for Rosetta, Ed, or Neal.

Positions Still Open.

TRANSMITTER on the roof
of the LS and A building.
U.M. STYLISTS
at the Uion
anytime Mon.-Sat.
-8:30 .m.-5:15 p.m.

oTATE

ENDS TONIGHT
"UPTOWN SATURDAY
NIGHT" (PG) at 7 & 9 p.m.
Box office opens 6:45
231 S. State 9 Dial 662-6264,

STARTS TOMORROW
When in Southern California visit g I ERSAL STUDIOS TOUP
ANjC444iN
~ IF~L'IDS l

NEW YORK t") - The eighth
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the Metropolitan Opera :s devot-
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It is compiled by Maria F.
Rich and features more than
500 operas by 190 foreign --,,m-
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Hackman a Pacino k
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HALF PRICEThurs. & Fri.-7:30 9:30
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Main
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vithLILLIAN R(OTHG

The University of Mchigan
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
p esent NEW
YoRk
inthe
POWER CENTER

a
17
. , J
Jan. 17.19
C"

1 U
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603 E. LIBERTY
DIAL 665-6290
OPEN DAILY 12:45
SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

I 9%'eksA
I

AP Photo
JULIE NIXON EISENHOWER talks with reporters Tuesday
outside NBC studios in New York after taping her television
hostess debut.
AN OPEN THEATER WORKSHOP
for persons interested in ioining
The Theater Company of Ann Arbor
0 workinq with mime, dance, improvisation, and story-
tellinq techniques
TIME: 7 p.m., THURSDAY, Sept. 19
PLACE: The lower level of THE CHURCH
OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD, 2145
Independence Blvd. (off Packard
Rd. in Ann Arbor)
RALPH HERBERT

BO OT IT!*
HEADQUARTERS FOR . . .
" FRY BOOTS
" CLARK'S WALLABEES
" DEXTER SHOES
" CLARK'S TREKS
" FLORSHEIM
" BASS
" HIKING BOOTS by: Frye,

MAIL-ORDER
WESTERN STYLE!
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