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September 15, 1974 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-15

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September 15, 1974

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY SundQy, September 15, 1974

Team
By ROGER ROSSITER
No one's talking about Rob Lytle's 86
yards rushing, or the "big plays" turned in
by Gil Chapman, or Rick Koschalk's stellar
play at middle guard or the defensive line's
total domination of the scrimmage line in
yesterday's 24-7 victory over Iowa.
With all the hoopla created by Dennis
Franklin not playing and the strong per-
formance turned in by his sub, Mark El-
zinga, many significant individual perfor-
mances were overlooked.
BO SCHEMBECHLER faced an unfami-
liar situation in preparing for the Hawkeyes.
Not since his first year (1969) has there
been such uncertainty over the starting
lineup and so many key position switches.
Yesterday's game was the first test for
Bo's reorganization plan, and despite the
shroud of Franklin's illness, the plan pre-
vailed.
The defensive line, hit hard by graduation
and maligned as the team's weak link,
destroyed the Iowa ground game, yielding
a mere 54 yards on 37 rushes. End Dan
Jilek, Koschalk, middle linebacker Steve
Strinko and outside linebacker Carl Russ
spearheaded the charge against Iowa's
Wing-T attack, an offense "we haven't seen
in five years," Schembechler said.
The Hawks did accumulate 138 yards
passing, but it did them little good without
a running game.
"THEY RAN A LOT of play action on

effort

AlLmmlk ldlmmk I Ar Amok.
AMP-19a
pdya

their passes, trying to freeze the lineback- tained in his offensive line despite skeptics'
ers," said Russ. "Everything went as claims to the contrary.
planned," added the senior linebacker from And what about the "Jersey Jet," Mr.
Muskegon Heights, "except for the touch- Chapman? He only touched the ball eight
down. We didn't plan on them scoring." times, but when he did things happened.
Koschalk probably never thought he would His 38-yard dash around right end spiced
be playing last spring, but Tim Davis' foot with six cutbacks set up the Wolverines'
injury gave him his chance. "You just have first touchdown.
to hope for the best when you're playing "If they would have pursued quicker, I
behind a probable All-American like Timmy would have gone all the way," Chapman
-just keep plugging away.' said. "It took them a long time to catch up
to me.

"Everything went as planned
except for the touchdown. We
didn't plan on them scoring."
-Carl Russ, 'Al' linebackerj
And if anybody deserves accolade for
exhibiting sheer guts and the desire Kos-
chalk's talking about, it would be Chuck
Heater.
Only two short weeks ago Heater could
barely walk, let alone plunge headlong into
people outweighing him by 30 to 50 pounds.
But Heater played and ran and cut like
the Heater of old despite those sore knee
ligaments and his new position. "I was
pleased that Heater lasted," Schembechler
said. "He's not the polished player he will
be when he's fully recovered."
The Wolverine overland express featured
a carload of runners, and its 318 yard total
varifies the confidence Schembechler main-

THEN IN THE third quarter he caught
Elzinga's only two completions, the second
for a ten yard touchdown. But the one that
got away just before the first half ended
was the one Chapman wanted most. With
the ball on the 54, Elzinga let loose a bomb
that Chapman ran under on the three, only
to have the ball slip off his hands.
"The ball was tipped but I should have
caught it anyway. We have a drill to work
on plays like that," Chapman said.
Schembechler even let six of his prize
freshmen in on the action, and Bo has made
clear he doesn't like playing freshmen.
When they are that good, however, what
else can he do?
His two freshman backs, Max Richardson
and Scott Corbin, carried the ball four
times between them, netting 36 yards. With
talent like theirs on the bench, the Wol-
verines should have no worries in con-
tinuing their winning ways.

Daily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
WOLVERINE TAILBACK ROB LYTLE finds himself in a dif ficult situation as Hawkeyes Dan LeFleur and Shanty Burks (49)\
close in. The 6-1, 190 pound sophomore tailback managed to avo id defenders enough to pile up 86 yards rushing, tops for the

team in yesterday's opening victory.

S.r-

heads or tales
Marc Feldman
'one man doesn't ...
stop the show'
,IFTING THROUGH the pile of publicity releases and news-
paper accounts of Michigan's chances on the gridiron this
fall, one had no trouble compiling a list of superlatives describing
Wolverine quarterback Dennis Franklin. Franklin is "super,"
"terriffic," "the best I ever coached," ad infinitum.
Under the category of backup quarterback to Franklin, the
picture was unclear, at best. The names of Mark Elzinga and
John Ceddia were about as familiar as Woodward and Bernstein
before the Watergate caper, and neither had ever taken a snap
from center in a Michigan varsity uniform.
Yesterday in Michigan's easy 24-7 disposal of the Iowa
Hawkeyes, Mr. Elzinga arrived and even if the occasion
was marked with something less than a fanfare from George
Cavender's trumpet section and he didn't pass for 200 yards
or run for 100, Elzinga proved he was a most competent
quarterback under trying circumstances.
Consider some of the strikes against Elzinga as he took the
field.
* Having been ineligible as a freshman and a redshirt last
year, he had not played a competitive game of football since
November, 1971.
® The figure of ill Dennis Franklin, sitting on the sidelines
and 76,000 cynics making those inevitable though unfair com-
parisons.
The basic first game butterflies anyone eperiences.
"Z," as he is referred to by his teammates, didn't dazzle the
statisticians with his six carries for 25 yards and two completions
in eleven passes, but it wasn't what he did that pleased Bo
Schembechler most-it was what he didn't do-cough up the ball.
"Just think of the plight of the boy. He hasn't played for two
years and comes in today and makes no ballhandling mistakes
and doesn't throw an interception," Schembechler bubbled.
"Normally his strong suit is passing but he didn't pass well
today."
Defeated Iowa coach Bob Commings thought Elzinga played
well. "The offense didn't bust with him in there," Commings
commented. "We were counting on some mistakes and some
mishandled snaps, but it seemed that he always came up with
the big play."
Z played it pretty safe on Michigan's first touchdown
drive as Rob Lytle, Gil Chapman and Chuck Heater took
turns at penetrating the Hawk line. As Bo said of the initial
march, "Under the circumstances, I wasn't about to come
out wheeling and dealing. I just wanted to win the game."
Elzinga took things a little more into his own hands on
Michigan's next possession with a key third down scamper and
a short touchdown run. Confronted with a third and seven on
to scramble left for 10 yards and a first down. Two plays later,
the Hawk 19, Elzinga faked the handoff to the right and proceeded
Z faked very convincingly to Heater and waltzed the yard and a
half himself.
Despite his auspicious if unspectacular debut, Elzinga wasn't
about to clamor for the first-string job once Franklin returns.
"I don't mind playing behind Dennis Franklin. To have a cham-
pionship team, you have to have more than one good quarter-
back," Z said.
Franklin's health had been veiled in mystery since he had
reported a lethargic condition to Schembechler last Saturday.
"Sunday," Bo claimed, "Dennis still felt poorly so he was
tested by everybody for everything including mononucleosis
and sickle cell anemia."
"He practiced Thursday but every time he exerted himself,
he got dizzy so we prepared to go with Elzinga that night," Bo
reported. Franklin was about as enthused about watching the
game as his fans were in not watching him. "The bench isn't
the place to be," Dennis moaned, "It's a drag."
Borrowing a phrase usually associated with Ringling Brothers,
Barnum and Bailey circus or a Broadway play, Chapman summed
up the resolve of the Wolverines to win despite Franklin's illness.
"One man doesn't stop the show," said the Jersey Jet and
Elzinga's performance proved that.

CHAPMAN, LYTLE SPARK OFFENSE

Elzin~

pilots

ichigan

win

(Continued from Page 1)
the potential Iowa drive came
to a sorry end when defensive
end Larry Johnson grabbed off
a Fick pass in Michigan terri-
torR.
The second half started out
the same way, as Elzinga's
third and long pass to -Chap-
man fell just out of his reach.
The Hawks, in turn, could not
capitalize on the break given
them when Johnson and Kurt
Kampe flattened punter Joe
Heppner.
AFTER AN excellent punt re-
turn by Dave Brown, the Wol-
Harriers hustle
YPSILANTI - Eastern
Michigan made an extreme-
ly good showing by captur-
ing the top four places over
the five-mile EMU Classic
Cross Country Run. Michigan
remained close behind in the
unscored meet. Greg Meyer
was 5th with 24:59. Fresh-
men Mike McGuire and Jay
Anstaett finished an impres-
sive 7th and 14th respective-
ly. Veterans Jon Cross and
Keith Brown were 8th and
11th to round out the strong
top five. The short 34 second
difference between Michi-
gan's 1st and 5th man is
considered very good group-
ing.
verines found themselve on the
Iowa 37. After two rushes gar-
nered but three yards, Elzinga
completed the first pass of his
college career to a wide open
Gil Chapmanrat the Iowa 36.
Following Elzinga's gain of four
yards, Rob Lytle took off on a
sweep to his right, and aided
immeasurably by a Heater
block, picked up eighteen yards.
Two plunges by Heater moved
the ball to the ten, but play
was broken up when a large
dog took to the field.nFor those
The Huskers scored the firs
four times' they had the ball as
Oregon was unable to cope with
Humm's hot passing and th
ball carrying of fullback Tony
Davis and I-back John O'Leary

~ ~g1 i4ii-jan §aitij
SU~NDAY SPORTS
NIGHT EDITOR:
LEBA HLRTZ

in the crowd of 76,802 who were
present at last year's Illinois
game, there was a sense of
de ja vu.
After the dog had been clear-
ed off the field Elzinga, faced
with a third down situation, hit
Gil Chapman at the four, and
watched as Chapman wiggled
over. As the crowd cheered
Lantry's conversion, the cheer-
leaders flipped off 21 points on
0,c xx~nnti1 l ~ h liv nhnd

got. Iowa didn't fumble and
they -didn't give us good field
position. I knew that Commiags
would be out not to make -mis-
takes.
IT WAS A remarkably well
played game for both teams.
Neither team fumbled, and
Fick's three interceptions were
the only turnovers of the after-
noon.

tn.Especially heartening for
S MICHIGAN'S FINAL points Michigan was the play of the
came in the fourth quarteron rebuilt defensive line. The only
amerive thateturda nine- complaint defensive co-ordina-
a drive that featured ntn y tor Gary Moeller had about his
teen yard jaunt by Lytle boys efforts was that the pass
through a gaping hole on the rush was weak. "But that was
left side of the line; but the rusly e t u hatas
drive stalled, and Lantry came mostly due to Iowa's misdirec-
in to kick a 30 yard field goal. tion plays.
This was not their last scar- "But we've got to bQ better
.is anoteterastfsc-for Colorado, warned every
ing chance, however, a s afirceMichigan c o a c h questioned
pass ru byeDanJikorceabout yesterday's performance.
Fick to dump the ball into the Hopefully, Franklin will have
waiting hands of Dave Brown, recovered sufficiently to play
who came within an ace of next Saturday.
breaking the return all the way.,
However, two Elzingatpasses But even if he can't play, it
were broken up, and Lantry did is doubtful whether even a Big
not get enough height on his Eight team can change the in-
49 yard field goal attempt. evitable.
Prior to this time the Hawk-
eyes, although able to pick up
occasional first downs on Fickel
passes (he was 13 for 21 on the
dnv har notb ble-n h tno

Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
Z'unloads to the Jersey Jet

' TIDE DROWNS TERRAPINS:
Ma jor League::'
Standings

Lye

t
s
e
Y
-

A SERIES OF FICK comple-
tions moved the ball down to
the Michigan 25 and prompted

aay),nau nio een aueL
mount a sustained drive. But,
against the Michigan defensive
reserves, that soon changed.

the return of the first string.
Even they could not stop the
Hawks, and in the final minute,
Rod Wellington drove the final
six inches to spoil the Wolver-
ines' shutout bid.

CHICAGO (A) - Dick Allen,
the controversial Chicago White
Sox' slugging first baseman
who leads the American
League with 34 home runs an-

leaves

AMERICAN LEAGUE

- - - - - - - - - - --( 7)

New York
Baltimore
Boston
Cleveland
Milwaukee
Detroit
Oakland
Texas
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City
California

East
WV L Pct. GBj

79
78
76
71
70
67
West
83
79
74
72
71
59

67
69
69
74
77
79
64
68
73
75
75
89

.541
.531
.524
.490
.476
.459

1-
2/
7%/
9%
13

.565 -
.537 4
.503 9
.490 11
.486 111/
.399 24/a

Saturday's Games
New York 10, Detroit 7
Milwaukee 3, Boston 1
Minnesota 7-3, Kansas City 5-13
Baltimore 8-7, Cleveland 6-1; 1st
game completed of Friday night's
suspended game
Texas 8, Oakland 3
California 5, Chicago 0
NATIONAL LEAGUE

By The Associated Press
Mighty Oklahoma, the nation's
top - ranked c o 11 e g e football
team, needed a fourth-quarter
offensive burst to beat stubborn
Baylor 28-11 yesterday, while
Alabama, rated No. 3, requiredI
s o m e final - period defensivev
r i I, l
BULLE1INl
LITTLE ROCK (P) - Four f
pass interceptions, two by
safety Floyd Hogan, along
with a decisive 65-yard scor- t
ing drive gave 20th ranked
Arkansas a 22-7 upset of the f
fifth - ranked Southern Cal
Trojans last night. -
heroics to edge Maryland 21-16.
Oklahoma, heavily favored
against undermanned Baylor,
pushed the Bears all around the
field for the first three quarters,I
but managed only a 7-5 lead1

Culliver, but ne
recovery, inte
and a fake pu
period to ward
up Terrapins.
Alabama Coa
Bryant concede
was fortunate i
won the game,
beat anybody,"l
land outplayedi
field physically
win."
Eighth - ranke
drove 80 yards
with Woody Pe
final yard, fo
with 2:19 lefti
beat No. 20 Sta
terday in a nat
intersectionalc
game.
Petchell's to
came a three
lead forged on
goal by JonI
min- ®. tln_

eeded a fumble!
ercepted pass
nt in the final
1 off the fired-
ch Paul "Bear"

d that his team j
n winning. "We
but we didn't SC OR E S
he said. "Mary-_
us all over the ~~ ~_~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~
and deserved to GRIDDE PICKS
MICHIGAN 24, Iowa 7
d P e n n State Ohio State 34, Minnesota 19
on nine plays, Michigan State 41, Northwestern 7
on nne paysIllinois 16, Indiana 0
tchell going the Wisconsin 28, Purdue 14
r a touchdown Arkansas 22, Southern Cal 7
in the game to LSU 42, Colorado 14
Alabama 21, Maryland 16
nford 24-20 yes- San Diego at Arizona, inc.
tionally-televised Penn state 24, Stanford 20
college football S. Carolina at Georgia Tech, inc.
Missouri at Mississippi, inc.
Richmond 29, West Virginia 25
uchdown over- Toledo at Tampa, Inc.
-point Stanford Eastern Mich. 20, Western Mich. 19
Pitt at Florida St., inc.
an 18-yard field N. Carolina 42, Ohio U. 7
Langford three SMU at N. Texas St., inc.
w Zn .., 2hr Kent St. 20, Syracuse 14

Iowa coach Bob Commings, nounced nis reti
who knew his team was out- I baseball last nigh
classed before they came to Allen, 34, made
town, tried to be optimistic with one more yea
about the results. contract which is
"We had hoped to play field $250,000 a year.
position football, but we just Roland Hemond,
never got any," he commented ager of the Wh
softly. "I'm proud of the way firmed Allen's de
our defense played. They held
Michigan to 10-7 for three quar- "He. met with
ters. It was that first quarter told them of his
that buried us." then left,". said
think he wanted

rement from
t.
his decision
ar to go on his
estimated at
general man-
ite Sox, con-
cision.
the players,
decision and
Hemond. "I
to meet with

Bo Schembechler was also'
impressed with Iowa's olay.
"We had to earn everything we

the press and then decided
against it."
MICHIGAN

H~awks
TEAM
First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing-yards
Passes
Punts
Fumbles-lost
Penalties-yards
MICHIGAN
Iowa

plucked
MICH IOWA
19 16
58-318 37-54
34 138
2-11-0 13-22-3
3-29 5-31
0-0 0-0
4-40 3-18
14 0 7 3-24
0 0 0 7- 7

Elzinga
Heater
Lytle
Chapman
Bell
Richardson
Corbin

6
17
14
6
11
2
2

26
62
86
55
53
22
14

4.2
3.4
6.3
4.4
11.0
7.0

St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
Montreal
Ntc Vnrk

East
w
78
77
73
67
66

L
68
68
73
77
78

Pct.
.534
.531
.500
.465
.45

GB
5
10
11

PASSING
IOWA
att comp
91 ..Q

SCORING PLAYS:
MICHIGAN - Heater. 2-yard run

Int yds
. 112

IN,4

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