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September 13, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-13

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Friday, September 13, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Doge Three I

Friday, September 13, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Richardson hits Ford's pardon

(Continued from Page 1)
the former president has al-
ready suffered a severe pen-
alty.
"Richard Nixon's place in his-
tory as the first president to be
forced out of office would make
any court-imposed sentence he
might receive petty by compari-
son," Richardson said.
HE ADDED that he believed
it would be impossible for Nix-
on to receive a fair trial at the
present time.
Occasionally touted as a pos-
sible presidential candidate, the
coolly aristocratic Richardson
said he has no aspiration to oc-
cupy the White House two years
from now. "Ford will and
should be the Republican can-
didate for president," he said.
However, Richardson half-
jokingly admitted he "could
have been persuaded to be Mr.
Ford's vice president."
PUNCTUATING his carefully
phrased remarks with sips of
coffee, the Harvard graduate
said his immediate future will

be taken up with work on a book
and a series cf lectures he will
deliver at his alma mater next
year.
Richardson seemed uncon-
cerned about the massive public
outcry against Ford's parddon
for Nixon and the subsequent
drop in the president's popular-
ity. He said that once the ac-
tion is put "into a broader
perspective," there will be "a
rebuilding of support."
"The result should not be cy-
nicism or a feeling that the
criminal process has been
raped," he predicted.
ATTIRED IN a black and
gray pin-striped suit and red'
paisley tie, Richardson looked
every bit the product of his up-
bringing in one of the most
prominent and powerful Boston
families.
His hair - just beginning to
show gray highlights - was
styled in modishly conservative
Ivy League fashion. And the
horn-rimmed glasses only en-
hanced his scholarly appear-
ance.
Richardson's Ann Arbor visit
was sponsored by "Faculty and
Students for Milliken." ,
A GOOD campaigner, Rich-
ardson had many kind things to
say about the incumbent gover-
nor and particularly praised his
openness and candor.I
"Michigan has had a con-
cerned, responsive, capable

government," he said. "And,
there should be an extension of
the mandate from the people to
Governor Milliken and his ap-
proach."
The former attorney general
said that if the gubernatorial
contest between Milliken and
Democratic nominee Sander
Levin is similar to' their battle
four years ago, the outcome
r "mayvery well" be decided by
voters on the college campuses
across the state.
IN 1970 Milliken edged Levin
by a mere 40,000 votes. Most
college students at that time
were ineligible to vote because
they were under 21, Richardson
noted.
"I have seen big government
from the apex," he said. "That
has left me with ' an acute
awareness of the limitations of
dealing with human needs fromI
Washington."
People need effective state
government, which the citizens'
of Michigan have had during
Milliken's tenure, according to
Richardson.
HIS KNOWLEDGE of the
federal government in action
comes from a long and ex-
tremely diverse participation in
the national policy making pro-
cess.
Prior to his brief stint as at-
torney general, Richardson
served as secretary of defense

and as head of the Department
of Health, Education, and Wel-
fare. He started in the Nixon
administration as the under-
secretary of state.
In his home state of Massa-
chusetts, he filled the posts of
lieutenant governor and attor-I
ney general.
Despite his rigorous public
life, Richardson still finds time
to pursue his favorite hobbies,
including tennis, skiing, and
canoeing as well as to write
articles for a number of jour-
nals.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 8
Friday, September 13, 1974
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a il y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates : $10 by carrier (campus area):;
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscript ion rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).

ASSOCIATION OF JEWISH
GRADUATE STUDENTS
Presents a
G RADUATE BRUNCH
Bagels and Lox and Conservation
SUNDAY, SEPT. 15
11 a.m.
H I LLEL-1429 Hill St.
THE RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE of the
University of Michigan presents:
Howr Music Is Madte!
A WORKSHOP on the construction and repair
of musical instruments to be held SEPTEMBER
14. Presentations by guest speakers will be in
the morning and individual workshops will be
held in the afternoon.
9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. with a break for lunch
R.C. Auditorium, East Quadrangle

Doily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
Freon crisis?
University scientist Ralph Cicerone yesterday discusses his
theory that the inert gas freon is slowly destroying the earth's
atmosphere and as a result more deadly ultraviolet rays
will hit the planet. The condition, already severe according
to Cicerone, will get significantly worse in the next decade.

Huerta hicks off campaign

(Continued from Page 1)
protesting the selling of Gallo
wine.
Emphasizing that the lettuce
boycott was working, Huerta,
the highest - ranking female un-
ion officer in the U. S. claimed
that it costs growers $2.70 to
produce a crate of lettuce that
sells for only $2.00. "The grow-

if
you
see
news
7 ppen
call
76-DAILY

ers are losing money on every
crate of lettuce they sell," she
said.
IN REFERENCE to Team-
ster agreements which replaced
UFW lettuce contracts last year
and alleged Teamster harass-
ment of UFW supporters, she
said, "The walls the Teamsters
make are going to come tumb-
ling down."!
An announcer at the begin-
ning of the rally pointed out that
UFW speakers had intended to
use the steps of the Graduate
Library as a platform but "due
to a strange coincidence there
is a huge truck in the way, -
perhaps it is a Teamster
truck."
The back of an Ann Arbor
Sun pick-up truck was bor-
rowed for an impromptu stage
instead.
HUERTA ASKED rally par-
ticinants to boycott Gallo and
Guild wines along with non-
UFW-picked grapes and lettuce,
cautioning that Gallo has drop-
ped its name from many of its
products, simply labelling them
"from Modesto, Calif."
She explained that the UFW
has signed only one lettuce con-
tract and that no grapes are be-

ink harvested by UFW mem-
lers. She warned boycotters to
beware of false claims thatrpro-
duce is UFW-picked.
After Huerta's speech the au-
dience joined a folk singer in
some UFW songs and then fol-
lowed boycott leaders to picket
the Village Corner for selling
Gallo wine.
THE VILLAGE CORNER has
been the focus of local picket-
ing efforts throughout the- sum-
mer. These efforts are now ex-
panding. "We now have the
power and numbers to clean out
Ann Arbor of all Gallo wine,"
Huerta claimed.
There will be picketing of the
Village Corner every Saturday
with rides leaving from 11 a.m.
to 5 p.m. to continue the pro-
testing at Great Scott, which
sells non-UFW produce, accord-
ing to a local UFW organizer.
The Sherry brothers are man-
aging minor league baseball
teams. Ex-pitcher Larry pilots
the Charlestown W.Va., Pirates
in the Western Carolinas'
League and ex-catcher' Norman
manages the Salt Lake Ci t y
Angels in the Pacific Coast
League.

*

FILM BUFFS

MIXED
BOWLING LEAGUES
Sign up now at Union Lanes
Open 11 a.m.--12 mid. Mon.-Thurs.
11 a.m.-1 a.m. Fri. and Sat.
1 p.m.-12 mid. Sundays

The Ann Arbor Film Co-operative is holding an OPEN MEETING to encour-
age application for membership. If you are interested in working on projects
such as:
" AN 8 MM FESTIVAL
* MINI-COURSES IN FILMMAKING
" GUEST-DIRECTOR LECTURE SERIES
OR IF YOU FEEL YOU COULD CONTRIBUTE INNOVATIVE IDEAS
AND/OR TALENTS, THEN PLEASE ATTEND
MONDAY, Sept. 16-8 p.m.-MICH. UNION (Anderson A)

*

I

L

1)

MOVIE PARTY

Friley, Shook
Grishak and, Wicox
styling is our
*profession
not law!
u-M STYLISTS
at the Union

Two Hitchcock Classics
NOTORIOUS
with CARY GRANT
TORN CURTAIN
with PAUL NEWMAN
Saturday, Sept. 14
9:00 p.m.
at HILLEL-1429 Hill St.
Cost $1 75c for Hillel members
Annual Hillel memberships will
be sold for five dollars.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
::.. ..?:sae o sss iaisiiq..;.;.............:rn asa i: v r: ror:v. .: : r:::v::.::

STEAL THIS'B OK!
grew up copping change from my mother's purse. In college I stuck a transistor in
the telephone cord to get free calls. Then, I entered the big time, became an army
officer, and was trained in advance lying, cheating, and stealing, until finally in disgust
y I turned honest. It was an abandoned act of rebellion, and lo, it freed me. I was just
b yryQ
k barely in the army after that.
'If you steal, you're in the army. That's my perspective.
"Popular theft is largely a matter of who's fair game. In parlous times everybody is, to
! t somebody. In the 1770's American rebels righteously robbed loyalists and vice-versa.
. During the same period in stable Indian tribes theft was practically unknown within the 4H
' tribe (Encouraged sometimes outside the tribe). Are booksellers outside the tribe?
"Most bookstores operate very near the financial edge. Reportedly one-third of all
&I bookstores lose money, run at a loss. They're in the busines for love, not money. I
know enough about bookmaking, selling and using to assert that books are a fantastic
n bargain, like matches. Stealing books is a lot like robbing match girls, not exactly a
NJ' farout revolutionary gesture, just a lazy, military thing to do."
-Stewart Brand, The Last Whole Earth Catalog
R CENTICORE BOOKSHOPS BORDERS BOOKSHOP LOGOS BOOKSTORE 1
r, 4Hee&&eesheeane&

Friday, September 13
Day calendar
WUOM: Robt. Penn Warren, poet
& novelist, on "Democracy and
Poetry," sponsored by Natl. Endow-
ment for the Humanities, 9:55 am.
Educ. Media Ctr., A-V Ctr.: Auto-
biography of Miss Jane Pittman,
Shruing Aud., SEB, noon.
Hosp. Com. for Women: W10410
Hosp., noon.
Anatomy: Roy Schmickel, ."Isola-
tion and Localization of a Specific
Human Gene," 4804 Med Sc. II,
3:30 pm.

Art Museum: Cobblestone Farm
Restoration Benefit, antebellum re-
freshments & 19th cent. music,
Alumni Mem. Hall, Art Mus., 7:30-
9:30 pm.
Computing Ctr.: Keypunch/tele-
type films, "Basic Use of IBM 029
Keypunch," 1084 E. Eng.; "Advanc-
ed Use of IBM 029 Keypunch," 1024
E. Eng.; "Use of Teletype in MTS."
1500 E. Eng.; 7-10 pm.

Call 663-4129 for information

___i

1974's MOST HILARIOUS
WILDEST MOVIE IS HERE!
"May be the funniest movie of the
year. Rush to see it!" -Minneapolis Tribune
"A smashing, triumphant satire'
-Seattle Post Intelligencer
"Riotously, excruciatingly funny."
-Milwaukee Sentinel
"Consistently hilarious and
brilliant. -Baltimore Daly Record

CALCULATOR DEMONSTRATION
by MR. RON ST EVENSON from
Hewlett--Packard
Monday, Sept. 16 11 a.m.- 4p.m.
come in for the REAL story about calculators
U I rich's Bookstore 549 E. University
2321

I

ilk d

.

"Insanely funny, outrageous and
irreverent.-Bruce Williamson-PLAYBOY MAGAZINE

I

Phone 6 oo-.
Most Delicious Treat ..:
S .in theCity
Ihuhtin /1i9 4
ce Creat ePkwr
Serving Mountain High Ice Cream i
Fresh Fruit Sundaes, Shakes, Floats

ceet-aAa cunn-r rr -rivnr

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