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September 11, 1974 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-11

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, September 11, 1974

AMPHETAMINE MARKET:
Feds aim at drug

Carey, Askew win in

P1

WASHINGTON OP) - Armed kreig arrest and seizure opera-
with secret indictments against tion they claimed would crush
scores of alleged producers and the illicit amphetamine market
traffickers, U. S. and Mexican in America.
authorities planned to launch at The Drug Enforcement Ad-
12:01 a. m. EDT today a bljtz- ministration, which announced
Have a few extra moments
during the day? Need
something to occupy your mind?
THEN, tuck a copy of
Crossword Puzzle
under your arm.

the raids, said the coordinated
attack was the largest single
drug bust ever undertaken by
federal agents.
DRUG Enforcement Adminis-
trator John Bartels said an ex-
pected 125 arrests in 10 major
U. S. cities, coupled with Mexi-
co's simultaneous raids upon
clandestine laboratories, would
destroy the network solely re-
sponsible for annually flooding
the nation with three billion
pep pills.
That's nearly five times the
legitimate medical supply -
set by federal law - of the
drug. Bartels said streets sales
of contraband amphetamine
tablets, known as "mini-ben-
nies," are estimated to total
$1.6 billion per year.
Arrests were to be made in
10 cities, where federal grand
juries returned sealed indict-
ments based on evidence gath-
ered by a special DEA task
force over the last eight months.

ring
R E P O R T E R S were'
briefed on the operation yester-
day afternoon with the under-
standing that stories would be
withheld until after midnight,
but word of the raids appeared
in print before that hour.
South of the border, Mexican
officials planned to move in on
the last six of 10 laboratories
targeted by the DEA, U. S. of-
ficials said. Four labs were
shut down in raids over the last
few days.
Precise details of the Mexican
operation were not disclosed,
but Bartels said it was under
the command of Atty. Gen. Pe-
dro Ojeda Baullada, who had
promised the United States full
cooperation three weeks ago.
Hundreds of U. S. officers,
meanwhile, moved in on sus-
pected wholesalers and distrib-
utors in and near these cities:
San Diego, Los Angeles and
San Francisco,LCalif.; Phoenix,
Ariz.; Seattle; Portland, Ore.;
Milwaukee, New York City;
Boston, and Charleston, W. Va.

(Continued from Page 1) tantamount to election in heavily seeking a second term after he
support impeachment of former Democratic Washington. was indicted on federal charges'
President Richard Nixon, trailed In Florida, drugstore million- of bribery, conspiracy and per-
former state Sen. Louis Gore. aire Jack Eckerd easily won the jury.
Republican primary for the seat In Vermont, Salmon won eas-
IN NEW Hampshire, conser- of retiring Sen. Edward Gurney, ily over his lone rival, Johnl
vative Gov. Meldrim Thomson defeating Public Service Com- Reilly. Speaker Walter KennedyI
took a lead of nearly 2 to 1 over missioner Paula Hawkins. led the GOP race.
his moderate challenger, state In the contest for the GOP
Senate President David Nixon, In the Democratic race, Rep. nomination to succeed retiring-
in his bid for a second term. Bill Gunther led the 11-man field Sen. George Aiken, Rep. Rich-
,h e o but seemed likely to face an ard Mallary, the state's only
Among the state's Democrats, Oct. 1 runoff against either state House member, held a substan-
Rep. Hugh Gallen led a three- Ren. Richard Pettigrew or Sec- tial lead over former Federal
President Harry Senate and retary of State Richard Stone, P o w e r Commissioner Charles
oresetateSenRry cards who were in a close race for Ross.
former state Sen. Richard Leo- second place.
nard. Louis Wyman won the PATRICK LEAHY, the state's
Republican nomination for the GURNEY d e c i d e d against attorney of Chittenden Count

rimaries.
won the Democratic nomination
for the Senate.
In Connecticut, former Assem-
bly Speaker William Ratchford
and consumer advocate Toby
Moffett won Democratic pri-
maries for House seats from
the state's 5th and 6th Districts.
Ratchford defeated F r a n k
Santaguida, the Waterbury town
Democratic chairman, for the
right to face GOP Rep. Ronald
Sarasin in the 5th District.
In the 6th District, Moffett
defeated New Britain Mayor
Stanley Pac. That seat is now,
held by Rep. Ella Grasso, the
Democratic nominee for gover-
nor.

Senate seat of retiring Republi-
can Norris Cotton.
The Democratic race was
close between former state In-
surance Commissioner J o h n
Durkin and Dartmouth College
Prof. Laurence Radway.

UAW VP speaks to clericals

(Continued from Page 1)
victory requires a clear major-

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AUDITION NOTICE
Auditions for University Theatre Program's
PERICLES
with Guest Artist NICHOLAS PENNELL
and Showcase Productions of
THE KILLING OF SISTER GEORGE
and
THE RED LANTERN
(A model proletarian drama from the People's Republic of China)
THURSDAY: SEPT. 12-7:15 FRIDAY: SEPT. 13-
PERICLES: room 2528 Frieze SISTER GEORGE: room 2518 Frieze
RED LANTERN: room 2508 Frieze
Readinq copies aavitable at Theatre Office, Mendelssohn Theatre Bldq.
PERICLES Production in Power Center, Nov. 27-30
THE KILLING FSInSTER GEORGE-M'on.-Wed., Oct. 21-23, Arena Theatre
THE"RED LANTERN-Wed.-Sat., Nov. 13-16, Trueblood Theatre
THE BANANA CABARET ZAZZUZOO
FROM OUTER SPACE HALFWAY REVIEW
And Now .. .
TAIOCA
HOLIDAY*
Sept. 12-8p.m.
Sept.13,14,20,21-8& 11p.m.
HALFWAY INN-EAST QUAD-RC
For Reservations: 761-7831
o * Peachy Cream * Production
a " c~ . te . <=i>ro -.O.=> ""N-><"OC . o<r O* (>0""

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PREP
our HEAVIEST

IN THE District of Columbia, ity of those voting, and it is
which is electing its first mayor possible that the two unions
this y e a r, appointed Mayor could split the pro-union vote,
Walter Washington led in the leaving the race in a tie.
Democratic primary against his
challenger, attorney Clifford IF THIS happens, there will
Alexnde. Te noinaionis be a run-off election between the
Alexander. The nomination stwo choices which get the most
votes, and only after that will
it be decided whether clerical
employes will unionize and if
I WRH Rokin' 50so, what union will represent
WRCN KOCKIn 650 them.
Nevertheless, the UAW is con-
SENT fident that the vote will go
4 union and optimistic that it will
contest, ever!!! goUAW.
"I have to base my evaluation
on the campus people here,"
Fraser said. "The way they see
CH DOES it, they think we'll finish first,
and be in a run-off with AF-
SCME."
Fraser said he was confident
of a -pro-union vote because,
,A G O"in any working place the only
way you can have a democracy"
G H? is to have a union.
Most of the group at the rally,
city-the 7 original REWARD--

HOW MU
CHIC
WEI

.which was held in a balloon-
filled ballroom at the Michigan
League, expressed dissatisfac-
tion with the fringe benefits and
pay offered by the University.

As a Dixieland band filled the
room with music, a widowed
14-year employe of the medical
center explained, "We just
E haven't gotten a fair shake."

U' to hir~e new
women's advocate
(Continued from Page 1) six students, three faculty/staff
hopes for a new flood of appli- members, and Human Sexuality
cations. Advocate Jackie Bailey.
"What we're requiring right "The members were chosen
now is either a Bachelor's de- to represent a cross-section of
gree or it's equivalent - in the the community," Hollenshead
form of a working experience or commented.
community involvement," she Currently there is one male in
said. the group - Education Prof.
The updated job description, Charles Moody.
which will probably be formaliz-
ed by the Compensation Office
later this week, states that the __
women's advocate should be
chosen on the basis of her "con- G Dnc TtwAdvertngCjmd
cern and involvement with wo-
men's issues and her experi-
ence in change-related efforts."
Hollenshead believes that the
next women's advocate will
have a slightly different role Can
than Jeannette had during her
three-year tenure which coin-
cided with fledgling stages of
the local feminist movement.

(no, no, NOT the

members of the g r o u p, without their
instruments!!)
GRAND PRIZE: A Complete Set
of CHICAGO Albums, including
Robert Lamm's latest solo album,
"SKINNY BOY" - and m a n y
more Columbia albums!
-SECOND AND THIRD PRIZES, TOO!!

$150 reward offered
for a n y information
leading to the recov-
ery of original graphics
by CHAGALL, DALI,
VASSARELLY stolen
from
CENTICORE
BOOK SHOP
336 MAYNARD

it

ENTRIES AND ENTRY-BLANKS AT-
DISCOUNT RECORDS at S. University
DISCOUNT RECORDS on State St.
THE SCENE on Main St.
U CELLAR RECORD DEPT. in the Union

JOIN THE
STAFF
MASS MEETING
THURS., SEPT. 12
(Or drop in Today)
For more details, read
the "DAILY"-daily

"WE'RE AT a different point
ini time now," Hollenshead com-
mented. "Many of the former
activities of the advocates office
have been assumed by the Wo-
men's Studies department and
the Affirmative Action pro-
gram."
However, she pointed out
that the job description cites
the need for a "woman who ad-f
vocates changes i policies and
practices that affect women ad-
versely."
The search committee has set
no specific timetable, but Hol-
lenshead hopes to have the post
filled by Nov. 1.
The committee is composed of

any better?'
You're pretty darn good at
your job. But today, we all have
to consider how we can do
our work a little better. That's
how each of us.can help
keep our jobs here in America.
For now and for the future.
America. It only work
as well as we do,
Tha Nsaoo i Comiul.. Ofi s W&A1 0..

U

It Pays to Advertise in The Daily

OFF list price 2- ---'
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300 S. State 665-3679
1235 S. University 668-9866
Mon-Thurs.- 10-9 Fri.- 10-midnite
L Sat.-1 0-6 Sun. 12.6 _

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