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September 10, 1974 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-10

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Tuesday, September 10, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

TuesaySeptmbe 10,197 1 H MIHIGA DALY Pge eve

City Council denies heavily
protested site f or restaurant

INNOVATIONS
IN LEARNING

By CHERYL PILATE
In response to public outcry
and the recommendation of the
municipal Planning Commis-
sion, City Council last night de-
nied site plan approval to a
proposed Bonanza restaurant at
the Plymouth-Broadway inter-'
section.
Thirty-five residents living in
the Broadway area, which bor-
ders North Campus, attended
the counoil session and present-
ed a petition with 150 signatures
protesting the proposed build-
ing of another fast food restaur-
ant.
"THE LAST thing we need
there is another commercial es-
tablishment encroaching on the
area," said a resident of the
home which would have been}
torn down to provide space for

the steak house.
Several citizens also objected
to the "dangerous impact" a
popular restaurant would have
on the traffic flow along Broad-
way.
"If this is approved, Ann Ar-
bor will look as ugly as the
Washtenaw strip in Ypsilanti,"
an elderly man asserted during
the public hearing prior to coun-
cil's vote.
WITH COUNCILMAN
Richard Hadler (R-Fourth
Ward) accounting for the only
vote in favor of the measure,
the city's three political parties
united to deny approval to a
proposed branch of the nation-
ally - established restaurant
chain.
"As far as I'm concerned, ap-
proving this would just contri-

bute to the rape of the Traver
Creek area," commented Coun-
cilwoman Colleen McGee (D-
First Ward).
The city Planning Commis-
sion had unanimously recom-I
mended that council deny ap
proval to the proposed steak-
house on the grounds that it
would "aggravate existing traf-
fic problems, have a negative
impact on the residential na-

New forms of Adult, Continuing
and Non-Traditional Education
H 300 room 2215
Tuesday 4-6 p.m.
U of M Volleyball Club

ture of the neighborhood, and
violate the intent section of the
C-2 zoning district."
C-1 zoning is defined as in-
cluding purely local businesses.
ALTHOUGH THE Planning
Commission felt the proposed
land use would violate the
area's zoning, Mayor Stephen-
son voiced concern over the
consequences of the site plan
denial.

Organ izational

Meeting

THURSDAY, SEPT. 12, 7:30 P.M.
ANDERSON A, MICH. UNION
All Undergrads and Grads welcome

Jazz fest future
periled by debts

(Continued from Page 1)
a smashing success if it had
been held in Ann Arbor," claim-
ed an RMM staffer working
with Sinclair and Rainbow Pres-
ident P e t e r Andrews. "The
news of hassles at the border
must have made a lot of folks
decide not to come."
THE FESTIVAL was sched-
uled for St. Clair College's Grif-
fin H o 11 o w Amphitheatre in
Windsor, Canada, after Repub-
licans on City Council defeated
a motion granting permission
for the festival to be held at its
traditional site-O t i s S p a n n
Field on Fuller Road.

while crossing the border or at
the scene of the festival.,
"It seemed as though the
Windsor authorities and the bor-
der officials were making a de-
liberate effort to keep Ameri-
cans away by putting a scare,
through the press," said the
Rainbow spokesperson.
"THAT SEEMED to be their
intention in not letting John
Sinclair through at the border
and in arresting (former Rain-
bow People's Party leaders)
Pun Plamondon and Craig r31a-
zier backstage at the festival.
Pun and Craig were arrested'
for being convicted felons, esten
though they had been given1
written permission to enter the
country," the source said.

"I hope that what we reach-
ed tonight was a simple solu-:
tion," he said. "But I have no
doubt that the developer will
bring a suit againstzthe city."
McGee emphasized in re-
sponse that council "needs to!
adopt a firmly written ordinance
explaining to developers that
despite, their compliance with
various technical regulations,
that council does have the
power to exercise its own dis-
cretion."
IN OTHER action, Council ap-
proved 6-4 a resolution increas-
ing the fine on an expired park-
ing meter from $1 to $2.
The measure was 'a substitute
ordinance presented by Coun-
cilman Robert Henry (R-Third
Ward) which replaced a pro-
posal that would have increas-
ed the expired meter fine to
$3 and the fine on exceeding!
the legal time limit to $5. 1

Tuesday

September 10

4:00

-A-K--O
MARTIAL ART OF SELF-DEFENSE
Demonstration by TAKASHI KUSHIDA, 7th dan
Sponsored by Aikido Association of the
University of Michicion

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V 1*11aAnn Arbor, Michirgon
VV 313-663-5533
I e
* e PATENTIMEDICINES 9 PRESCRIPTIONSI COSMETICS O LIQUOR &rWINE
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GA* GEA
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MICHIGANUNIONhouhW,rd-florviconeeceRo
Disusionofforhc Mndnt-ayMiarcs ely-rora
GAYLIBRATO763-41863-18
__5, Monday--Frida
S b Cbe to Th Michigan DailySut Wn
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IM Bldg.-State & Hoover-Wrestling Rm.
Call MIKE TSUCHIDA for further info: 665-4864
FURTHER INFO: 971-4332 OR 763-2771
Aikido is a Japanese art of self-defense that is based on non-
resistance rather than strength. An attack is never stopped:
it is met and guided in a way that causes the attacker to be
thrown by the force of his own attack.
In addition to throws. Aikido also employs a number of wrist
techniques. Although these techniques are extremely painful
and can drive an aggressor to the ground immediately. they
are not designed to break bones or cause injury. For this
reason, Aikido can be said to be a "kind" form of self-defense.
The word aikido means "method, or way (do) for the Coordi-
nation, or Harmony (ai) of Mental Energy, or Spirit (ki)."
Aikido is then harmony of the mind and of the body.
we need not struggle against an opponent's strength. If we
lead his mind, his body will follow. However, to lead an op-
ponent's mind the Aikidoist must be calm and relaxed and in
control of his own mind and body. One of the most valuable
aspects of Aikido is that it trains its students to be relaxed
and in harmony with themselves and with others. These are
things which can be carried into our dailylives and can help
us to be better and more effective people.

Approximately 100
w e r e arrested by
authorities on drug

people
Canadian
charges,

-------r

Teachers and school
board hit agreement"

(Continued from Page 1)
--a top limit of elementary
class size at 30 and an average
teacher-pupil ratio of 1-28;
-an increase in elementary
teacher class preparation time
from 100 to 120 minutes per
week;
-a lowered ratio of high
school counselors to pupils from
the present 350 to 325 to 1;
-a clause that frees teachers
from giving administrators their
lesson plans on a routine basis;
and
oChit
pardon
(Continued from Page 1)
should pay for his wrong do-
ings."
Senior literary college student
Stacy Krainz supported Ford's
decision. "I don't hold anything
against Nixon," she said. "I
think that because of Watergate
he'll suffer enough."
One student, who asked not to
be identified, disagreed. "Nixon
should suffer for his sins," he
said. "Ford's decision makes
me very angry and very bitter.
I wish Ford would have started
unconditional amnesty with my
brother in Ontario rather than
with the crook in San Clemente."
TA'S, RA'S, SA'S
GRADUATE
EMPLOYEES' ORGANIZATION
JOIN
10-2 IN OFFICE
RM. 9, MICH. LEAGUE
OR
WITH DEP'TL STEWARD
VOTE
IN DEP'TS FOR YOUR
STEWARD
(1 Steward for
Everv 2S, or Fraction)
GO
TO ELECTION
MEETING SEPT. 24,
UNION BALLRM.
{Nominations for Pres., VP.,
Sec., Treas. Should Be Sub-
mitted in Writinq. at Office
Before Sept. 20)
TO BARGAINING
WITH THE U.

-a plan for introducing emo-
Stionally and physically handi-'
capped youngsters into regular
classrooms, as is now required
tby state law.
CITY SCHOOL administrator
Dr. Harry Howard said that
the new pact was a "good con-
tract," one with which "neither
party is completely satisfied but
nevertheless pleased."
Howard called the strike "re-
grettable" and -said. that further
delay in the school opening day
"would have resulted in a polar-
ization of community opinions
that would have had a long-
lasting detrimental effect on ur ;
students."
Both sides have said previous-
lv they regretted the last-min,
ute atmosphere of the negotia-
tions this year.. Along those
lines, Howard has invited the
AAEA to meet with him to plan
for a schedule of 1975-76 talks
that would conclude by July 1.

N
C

PROJECT OUTREACH
PSYCH. 201-2 CREDITS for Distribution
C.A.R. RAeCHILD
MEETINGCARE
.A.R. MASS MEETING ACIO
MAXEY IVM)ATION
CENTER
ORTHVI LLE
:REATIVE ARTS
ARTS Experiential [earning
CONSUMER ACTION
CN in 34 different
settings
WOMENS CRISIS CENTER
TONIGHT, Sept. 10th
POLITICAL PERSPECTIVE
HILL AUD. at 7:30 p.m.

JACOBSON'S OPEN

THURSDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS
SATURDAY UNTIL 5:30 P.M.

UNTIL 9 P.M.

S

YPSILANTI STATE HOSPITAL
MOTT HOSPITAL

QUESTIONS
Call: 764-9279
Come: 554 Thompson

SENIOR CITIZENS
SCHOOLS

{

t - -----

Stale Street-TheaLeague-TheUnion
-all are great traditions of a great University
GREENE'S CLEANERS is a tradition, too. For 49 years GREENE'S
CLEANERS have given the best in dry cleaning and shirt launder-
ing to thousands of Michigan students. In fact, many alumni around
the country still send garments to us for special cleaning services.
In Ann Arbor, GR E E N E'S have three convenient locations and 4
routes to service the quadrangles, dormitories, sororities, fraterni-
ties, apartments and rooming houses. At the information desks in
all quads and dorms you will find a GREENE'S card to fill out and
attach to your garments. You will also find a p I a c e to leave gar-
ments for GREENE'S daily pick-up service.
THE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE on dry cleaning and shirt
laundering takes three days. For same-day dry cleaning service,
take your garments to GREENE'S cleaning plants at
CAMPUS WEST SIDE
1213 $. University 1940 W. Stadium
NO 3-3016 ,NO2-2543

all "J"gals and guys...you're
invited to our Fall fashion session

I
i

Tuesday, September

10-7:30 p.m.

You'll see the season's big looks from classical to pop. .
the looks that solo, those that harmonize separates for
versatility. All swinging out free and easy, all sharp on
details. ..and in the instrumental colors like the new
blues. A complete performance including fashions, shoes
and accessories. Come sit in with us and stick around for

9j'eehe 4

Ii

!.

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