100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 10, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, September 10, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tuesday, September 10, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Boston
eers Sen.
Kennedy
BOSTON OP) - Sen. Edward
Kennedy (D-Mass.), was booed
and splattered with a rotten
tomato yesterday when he tried
to address an estimated 10,000
people protesting a court-or-
dered integration plan for Bos-
ton schools.
Kennedy niounted a platform
in front of the John F. Kennedy
Building in Government Center
and tried to speak.
DROWNED OUT BY b o os,
chants and calls to "Impeach
Kennedy" the senator left the
platform and went into the
building, making his way
through the jeering c r o w d
which surged toward the build-
ing and broke a plate glass win-
down after he was inside.
"People feel very strongly
about this issue," said a calm
but grim-faced Kennedy. "They
are entitled to their views."
Most of the crowd dispersed
after the Kennedy incident, with
only several hundred remaining
to hear other speakers, urging
parents to boycott the schools.
KENNEDY, who later left his
office in the building to return
to Washington, said after the
incident that someone had pull-
ed the plug on the platform mi-
cronhone and he quit trying to
speak.
The crowd, most of them wo-
men, first gathered on the Bos-
ton Common, near the State
House, then marched through
the downtown area, past t h e
Post Office where U.S. District
CourtJudge Arthur Garrity has
offices. They chanted "Garrity
must go.
Garrity has ordered the inte-
gration of Boston schools, which
open Thursday.
THE DEMONSTRATORS, vir-
tually all of them white, plan-
ned to march on the offices of
Sens. Kennedy and Edward
Brooke and ask them to support
federal antibusing legislation.

MOZAMBIQUE MELEE:
Rebel whites kill 30 in Beira

LOURENCO MARQUES, Mo-
zambique (A') - Thirty persons
were killed in clashes in the
key Mozambique port of Beira
yesterday and the city's main
radio station was taken over
by rebel whites, according to
unconfirmed reports broadcast
by the South African Broadcast-
ing Corp. The whites are trying
to declare Mozambique a sep-
arate state with a white gov-
ernment in control and foil an
agreement between Portugal
and black guerrillas granting in-
dependence to Mozambique.
THE REPORT came as Port-
uguese troop reinforcements
were ordered to move toward
the capital of Lourenco Marques
where white rebels set zip a
headquarters and took over the
airport, radio station and postal
center.
The report on the mercenaries
came from the Johannesburg
Star, which said the men who
once fought in the Congo in the
1960s were 'gathering in Johan-
nesburg and indications are they
may be recruiting for a push
into Mozambique."
The paper said that several
senior mercenary officers held
a private meeting at a hotel in
the South African capital on
Saturday. One of them con-
firmed the session took pace,
but called it a social gathering.
THE STAR said that the Tre-
sence of senior men from what
was known as Commando Five
10 years ago, the secrecy in-,
volved and the violence in Mo-
zanmbiqe makes it likely that
)nercennries "are regrowning
Io┬░,r action."

The white rebels took over a ages."
radio station, the airport and a The premier called the rebels
postal center in Lourenco Mar- a "small, desperate minority
ques on Saturday immediately with no understanding of the
after Portugal and the Mozam- evolution of history, interested
bique guerrillas, or Frelino, only in their personal gain." A
signed an agreement turning government statement warned
power over to a Frelimo-dom= that the leaders of the revolt,
inated government, calling for would be punished for their
independence in 1975. It ended "criminal acts."
a 10-year colonial war in Mo- The shooting in Beira was re-
zambique. ported by the South African
On Sunday, Portugal ordered Press Association, which s a i d'
units of its 60,000-strong army Portuguese soldiers fired over
in Mozambique to put down the the heads of a crowd in the sea-
white rebellion and restore or- port in a clash with whites op-
der so that the agreemen, sign- posing a transfer of power to
ed in Lusaka, Zambia, could be the blacks.
implemented and the black ma- THE SHOOTING was the first
jority take control. There are
about 8% million blacks in Mo- __

reported direct clash between
soldier and the white rebels,
who are trying to declare Mo-
zambique independent with a
white government in control, as
Rhodesia did in 1965.
The Association said the sold-
iers drove several thousand per-
when they began milling back
sons from the main square and,
into the square, the troops open-
ed fire.
The news agency quoted lead-
ers of the whites as saying one
of the soldiers, an African, was
shot and killed by his com-
manding officer when he refused
to shoot over the heads of the

crowd.

zambique and 250,000 whites.
PORTUGUESE Premier Vas-
co -dos Santos Goncalves said in
Lisbon that the army had not
gone into action in the Mozam-
bique capital because he rebels
in their takeovers were "using'
women and children as host-

THE MICHIGAN DILY
Volume L.XXXV, No. 5
Tiv-gdlav. Sentembpr 10. 1974
is erited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class nostneI
p aid at Ann Arbor. Michigan 48106.
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity vear at 420 Mavnard Street. Ann
Arbor. Michigan 48104. Subscription
'mites- :410 by carrier (campus area);
811 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
f12 non-local mail (other states and
foreit n),.
Summer session published Tues-
day throu gh Saturdav morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); 6.00 local mail
(Michitan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).

CO-EDUCATIONAL
TAE K WOv0N DO
KOREAN MARTIAL ART
The ultimate in self-defense and
physical fitness. For UM students
& staff. Men &.Women
""' 1
MASTER YU 5th degree
Korean Black Belt
MON. &WED. 6:30-9:00 p.m.
Angell Elementary School Gym
(corner of South U. & Oxford-on campus)
FOR INFORMATION CALL: 665-5555

'+X- ,-X

AP Photo
ANTI-BUSING DEMONSTRATORS jeer as Senator Edward Kennedy walks to the stage to
speak to a crowd of 10,000 in Boston yesterday. He was later splattered with a tomato.
The protesters voiced opposition to a court-ordered school integration plan set to begin
Thursday.

Metal failure causes Inieve l's dive

DAILY OFFICIAL BIILLETIN
Tuesday, September 10 employee who has publications toI
Day Calendar report for 1973 & who has not re-
wUOM: Live coverage, Senate For. turned a form, call DRDA Edit.
Relas. Com. hearings on Detente & Ofc.. 764-4277.
U. S. Rels. with communist coun- Career Planning & Placement
tries; witness. Eugene McCarthy, 10 3200 SAB, Phone 764-7460.
a.m. President's Commission on W. H.
Naval Arch., Marine Eng.: M. G. Fellows is accepting applications for
Parsons, "An Introduction to the 20 available W. H. fellowships to be
Environmental Considerations Af- granted for 1975-76 year; application
fecting Ship Design and Operation," deadline, 12/2/74; application ma-
311 W. Eng., 3:10 pm. terials, available at CP&P. Recruit-
Computing Ctr.: Keypunch/Tele- ers on Campus: Grad. & Prof.,
type films, "Basic Use of IBM 029 Schools visit CP&P to interview
Keypunch." 1084 E. Eng.; "Ad- students interested in grad studies.
vanced Use of IBM 029 Keypunch," Organizations make on-campus vis-
11024 E. Eng.; "Use of Teletype in its to fill their personnel needs. Re-
MTS," 1500 E. Eng.; 7-10 pm. cruiting begins Sept. 30. If you are
WCBN-FM: Talk Back, J. Feld- a degree candid, don't wait til'
kamp Housing Dir., call in, 763-3500, you've graduated, start interview-
89.5 MHz, 7 pm. ing on Sept. 30. You only have one
Astron. Film Festival: Cosmic chance to see many of the recruit-
Zoom & The Crab Nebula; Skylab: ers during 1974-75 season. A tenta-
The Second Manned Mission, Aud. tive list of campus visitors, import-
3, MLB, 8 pm. ant test dates, and info on how
1973 U-M Bibliography: Forms for to start your job search has been
1 bibliographic info for 1973 U-M Bib- compiled for you. Pick up your
Uography have been mailed to fac- copy at 3200 SAB soon after Sept.
ulty & staff at home, any Univ. 15.

TWIN FALLS, Idaho (P) -
Stuntman Evel Knievel says a
weakness in the metal holding,
the parachute system in place
was responsible for his rocket
ride into the Snake River Can-
yon rather than over it.
"THERE WAS A metal fail-'
ure," Knievel tolds a news con-
ference Sunday night less than
four hours after he was lifted
by helicopter from rocks at the
base of the 600-foot'canyon.
"To lose to a beautiful river
and canyon like this to me it
not a real loss," said Knievel,
the cuts on his right cheek and
lip standing out as red lines
on his tan face.
The chutes began deploying
even as the red, white and
blue Sky-Cycle cleared the
launch ramp Sunday, pulling the
missile back like a yank on a
shirt collar.
The vehicle was halted before
it had traveled half the neededI
distance, and seconds later Kni-
evel was on the canyon bot-I
tom, the bloodied survivor of
yet another fall.
DESIPTE THE FAILURE of
the stunt, probably the most
widely publicized in history,
Knievel was assured of $6 mil-
lion and stood to earn much
more from proceeds of a live
closed-circuit telecast and re-
lated deals.
Promoters of the telecast had
been predicting the total take
could reach $20 million.
Asked if he would attempt

the stunt again, Knievel re-
sponded, "I don't know what
I'm going to do. I sat in it and
gave it my best."
In a late night telephone call
to television station KUTV in
Salt Lake City, Knievel said
that "metal fatigue" had caused
bolts holding a canister con-'
taining the parachutes to sheer
off when the engine fired, send-:
ing the chutes spilling out be-'
hind.

The surprise call from Knie-
vel's motel room here was to
a talk show, "Take 2," hosted,
by John Prince with newsman
Bruce Northcott, which featur-
ed videotapes of the abortivej
jump.
DURING THE conver-1
sation, Knievel stressed that he!
had not inadvertently activated
the parachute system - one ex-
planation offered for the mis-
hap.
Earlier, just after his rescue,
the dazed Knievel walked back'
toward the launch ramp and
said, "The machine ,was going
sideways -on me. I tried to steer
it. J just don't know what hap-,
pened."
The steam-powered Sky-Cycle
was to have traveled 3,000 feet
at 300 miles per hour, enough
to carry to well beyond the op-
posite canyon rim, 1,600 feet
away.
EIGHTEEN S E C O N D S
after launch, Knievel was to
have thrown the lever deploying
the chutes to carry the missileE

earthward. Instead, the vehic
lurched upward for nine se
onds and ceered to the righ
Then, about 1,000 feet in the ai
it turned downward and begs
the twisting, nose-first desce:
that hushed the thousandst
onlookers.
Pushed by a brisk nor
wind, the cycle glanced off
canyon shelw and onto roc
about 20 feet from the Snal
River, where it came to re
right side up. Knievel said th
piece of luck saved his life.
Even for skeptics, Knievel
attempt to hurtle himself ov
the canyon was spectacula
dangerous and suspenseful. A
the Montana-born huckste
stuntman carried off the defe
with characteristicallytarroga
style.
Knievel's grandmother, E]
ma, 81, said she cried her hea
out. His children - Kelly, 1
Robbie, 11, and Tracy 10
wept silently. His wife, Lind
dry eyed, but her temper h,
surged as she urged on h
husband's rescuers.
AS THE ROCKET settled in
the canyon, friends and rel
tives shouted, screamed a
cried. Linda called her childr
to be with her at the cany
KAPPA a
SIGMA
pr

le
C-
Xt.
ir, !
in
nt
of
tth

wall. When the bloodied Knievel
emerged, he gave his wife a
long kiss and they disappeared
into the trailer.
Emma Knievel said: "I'm so
glad its over and if there's a
party tonight I'll be there with
bells ''
s',,o 1 fflv onKn~

i ,nevels ftatner, Dbob n\ieve -----
a' of Butte, Mont., said after the
ks launch that his son had told him
ke the day before that the family
st had to be strong.
gat
Gripping his custom - built
black cane, Knievel walked
along the metal fences sur-
er rounding the launch area to
r, shake hands with his assembled
nd admirers. "You are the living:
er- god,", one group cried out tof-
at the figure in the stars-and- (LUTHERAN
.nt stripes jump suit.
Tn is telephone call to KUTV,
m- Knievel cautioned adventurous: 801 S. FOREST at Hill
irt children: "Maybe because I
3; made this jump, young children j 668-7622
-will realize that even with the :
[a, best help in the world, maybe
ad this is not the thing to do." Worship Service: Sunday, 10:30a.m.
er Promoters of the stunt has
consistently predicted a turn- ..::;.;;"..:;:;;.;.;.
Ito out of 50,000, but less than half
a- that number appeared to be on
nd hand. Twin Falls County Sheriff: : . : ::;:
en Paul Corder estimated the
on crowd at 15,000. ').
COURSES IN CHRISTIAN FORMATIONCY-HOUSE
FALL 1974
(EPISCOPAL)
D D P I THE NARROW RIDGE
LLA P Leader: Rev. Andrew Foster. Time and Dates: Friday b N.n.
evenina. Oct. 4 and All Day Saturday, Oct. 5 218 N. IVISI
A CHAPTER PLACE: Canterbury House
THE PARABLES 665-0606
resents Leader: Rev. Andrew Foster. Time and Dates: Friday
I) evening, Nov. 8, and All Day Saturday, Nov. 9
PLACE: Canterbury House Holy Eucharist at Noon on Sundays
D AFUNDAMENTALS OF ROMAN CATHOLICISM: PART I
Leader: Fr. Bill Gavin, S.J. Time and Dates: 7:30-9:30
p.m. 9 Wednesdays, beainnina Sept. 18
PLACE: The Newman Center, St. Mary's Chapel
HUMAN SEXUALITY AND CHRISTIAN VALUES
Leader: Fr. Charles Irvin. Time and Dates: 7:30 p.m.
Thursdays, Oct. 17 and 24, Nov. 7 and 21
'ONCERT PLACE: The Newman Center, St. Mary's Chapel
THEOLOGY OF LIBERATION
Leader: Sr. Connie Smedinqhoff. Time and Dates: 7:30-Tl
IER C AZY II 9:00 p.m. 5 Wednesdays, beainnina Oct. 16
PLACE: The Newman Center, St. Mary's Chapel
THE CHANGING FOCUS IN CATHOLIC THEOLOGY: PART 1I
Leader: Sr. Connie Smedinahoff. Time and Dates: 7:30-
A EL9:00 p.m. 4 sessions on alternate Mondays to be announced
PLACE: The Newman Center, St. Mary's Chapel
MARRIAGE ENCOUNTER PROGRAM 331 THOMPSON at William
Leaders: Fr. Bob Livinaston, 663-0557
iber 14 g seo: i,4663-0557
Dates: Oct. 4-6; Nov. 22-24, 1974
I Feb. 14-16; May 16-18. 1975
orium-8 p .M. PLACE: Sienna Heiqhts Colleqe, Adrian, Michigan
j PREPARING FOR MARRIAGE Sunday Masses: 7:45, 9:00,
1. Marriaqe Preparation Seminar 0:3 1 2-:44 5 :44
Contact St. Marv's Student Chapel
Time and Dates: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 20, 23, 27, 30; Nov. 3, 6
2. Enqaqed Encounter Weekends
Q Contact a chaplain, 663-0557
?4,f $5 & $6Time and Dates: Sept. 20-22; Oct. 1 1-13, 25-27;'
Nov. 8-10, 15-17
Hudson's 'PLACE: Sacred Heart Seminary, 2701 Chicaqo Blvd., Detroit
nn lSYMBOL, RITUAL & LITURGY
Grinnefl sLeader: Fr. Bob Livnaston. Time and Dates: To be
Bop Shop PLACE: The Newman Center, St. Mary's Chapel

1lL.#

the Vdeel Centre

CON'

I,

N

3588 Plymouth Road Ann Arbor
(Just West of U.S. 23)
Daily 11-8, Sot. 10-6, Sun. 12-5
HEADQUARTERS FOR
BICYCLE SALES & SERVICE
Plus
Panasonic of Japan
Ct~e3ritof Sw aeto
/7 of AMFAICA
Large Selection of
Fine Bicycles ...
Styles and Sizes for All Ages
Complete Line of Accessories
& Components

also
featuring

Sat., Septem
Hill Audit(

IN C
"THAT NIG

4D

Tickets $
on sale at .

-ii

I

I
knal

I) . . _

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan