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December 08, 1970 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

& Tuesday, December $, 1,970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven'

* Tuesday, December 8, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Eleven

OVER 25,000 LPS. OVER 300 LABELS IN STOCK
ATCH FOR SPECIAL SALE
ITEMS CHANGING WEEKLY
discount records

'Al' readiesfor Gophers

Vf

1235 S. UNIVERSITY 0 300 S. STATE
668-9866 665-3679

" ANN ARBOR,
MICH.

DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON & ARCHIVE
Wo ON SALE
Todlay until Saturday, Dec. 12, All DGG's

1 kr I
a
Here are just a few of the Deutsche
Grnmophon and Archive Records
now on sale for only $3.59 per LP
at Discount Records' two great Ann
Arbor stores:

6. 138 714
7. 138 755
8. 138 815
9. 138 907
10. 198 168

BACH: 'Concerto for 2 Violins;
BEETHOVEN: Romances, Nos. 1/2;
VIVALDI: Concerto Grosso for 2
Violins & Strings-David & lgor Ois-
trakh; Royal Phil/Oistrakh/Goossens
DVORAK: Cello Concerto - Pierre
Fournier, Cello; BPO/Szell
MOZART: Symphonies No. 40/No.
41, "Jupiter"-BPO/Bohm
BACH ORGAN WORKS: Toccata &
Fugue in D Minor, Trio Sonata No.
2, Prelude & Fugue in D, Fantasia
& Fugue in G minor-Karl Richter,
Organ
PRAETORIUS: Dances from "Terp-
sichore"; WIDMANN: Dances &
Galliards; SCHEIN: Three Suites
from "Banchetto Musicale"-Col-
legium Terpsichore

1. 136 001
2. 136 226.
3. 136549
4. 137002
5. 138 674

R. STRAUSS: Also sprach Zarathu-
stra - BPO/Boehm (Music from
film, "2001: A Space Odyssey"),
MOZART: Eine kleine Nachtmusik;
BEETHOVEN: Egmont Ov.; SME-
TANA: The Moldau; LISZT: Les
Preludes-BPO & BRS/Fricsoy
TRUMPET MUSIC FROM BOHE-
MIA: 7 works by Bibler, Tolar, Po-
glietti, Schmeltzer, Wejwanovsky-
Adolf Scherbaum, S. Simek, Trum-
pets; Paris C h a m b e r Orchestra/
Kuentz
STOCKHAUSEN: Gruppen for 3
Orchestras; Carre for 4 Orchestras,
4 Choruses-The composer, w/Mi-
chael Gielen, Mauricio Kagel,'Bruno
Maderna, Andrzei Markowski
SCHUMANN: Cello Cto.; TCHAI-
KOVSKY: Variations on R a c o c a
Theme-Mstislay Rostropovich, Cel-
lo; Leningrad Phil/Rozhdestvensky

Through Saturday
All DGG & Archive
ONLY
$359
per LP
11. 198 197 BACH: Magnificat; Cantata No.
78, "Jesu, Du der Meine Seele"*
Sta er, Toepper, Fischer - Dieskau,
Haefliger, others; Ansbach Festival
& MBO/Richter
12. 2707 023 BERG: Wozzeck - Fischer-Dies-
kau, Lear, Wunderlich, 138 991/
92 others; Chorus & Orch, of Ber-'
lin Opera/Boehm

the
uiversity
cel lar
Buying
Books.,
In the Union basement.
Dc. 7-Dec. 19
9:30-5:30
at Bursley
Dec. 16-19
6:30 p.m.-9:30

after w
By BILL ALTERMAN
Michigan's Icprs are looking
forward to this coming weekend
series if for no other reason than
they would like to forget last
week's.
Friday, the Wolverines were
bombed 8-2 by Colorado College
and the next day, despite play-
ing what Coach Al Renfrew call-
ed "their best game of the sea-
son," they were blasted 6-3.
This weekend Michigan will
play their first home games af-
ter playing the part of the visit-
or for three straight weeks. The
Wisconsin Badgers will furnish
the opposition for the two-game
series to be held at 8 p.m. on
Friday and Saturday at the
Michigan Coliseum.
Colorado College, you may re-
call, was without a doubt t h e
worst team in the WCHA la s t
year, and the only team the
Wolverines were able to take a
two-game set from. Things were
a little different this year, how-
ever.
In the first game Michigan
got off to an early lead when
Rick Malette passed out from
behind the net to Bernie Gagnon
WCHA Standings
W L.
Colorado College 4 0
Michigan Tech 3 1
'Duluth 4 2
North Dakota 5 3
Denver 2 2
MICHIGAN 1 3
Michigan State 2 4
Wisconsin 2 4
Minnesota 1 5
Saturday's Results
Duluth 6, Wisconsin 4
Michigan Tech 4, Michigan '
State 2 ,
North Dakota 10, Denver 4
Colorado College 6, Michigan 3
HOLIDAYS
from
DASCOLA
U-M BARBERS
OPEN MON.-SAT.
0 Liberty off State
0 East Univ. off So. Univ.

who slapped it in from out
front. The Tigers came back
with two goals in the period but
Michigan tied it up in the se-
cond period on a goal by Brian
Slack.
At the start of the third per-
iod Colorado College held a slim
3-2 lead but blew the Wolverines
off the ice with five goals in
the final stanza.
The next night the Tigers
again led 3-2 after two quarters
and quickly built it up to 5-2.
Michigan's goals were scored
by Gagnon, who leads'the team
with seven, Slack and freshman
Rene Desmarais.
The biggest problem for t h e
Wolverines, according to Ren-
frew, was simply "putting t h e
puck into the net." Saturday
the Wolverines outshot the Tig-
ers 32-19. In thethird period
alone Michigan took 11 shots
and made one, while Colorado
took six and made three.
"We just missed too m a n y
chances around the goal." Ren-
frew said, although admitting
'M' shots hit the post three
times. "We will have to be more
aggressive around goal," he add-
ed.
Despite allowing 14 goals in
two games, Renfrew would not
fault his goalies.
"They both (Karl Bagnell and
Doug Hastings) played pretty
well." The two alternated this
past weekend, Bagnell playing
the first game and Hastings the
second, and Renfrew expects to
continue alternating them
against Wisconsin.
However, the coach did find
fault with his forwards for "not
backchecking well enough."
Renfrew is also not pleased
with his teams consistency.
"Only in the second North Da-
kota game (a 2-1 victory) did
we play well for three periods."
. More often than not the Wol-
verines will play well for two
periods only to be stymied, as
against the Tigers, in the third.
In the first game with Color-
ado College, Michigan found
themselves the victims of three
third-period breakaways by the
Tigers. Renfrew admitted that
when you start pressing, as
Michigan did "either you catch
up or you get beat bad."
Renfrew gave the Colorado
team high marks, saying "their
goaltending was outstanding
and their whole team played
well."

Saturday was highlighted by
Wolverine captain and forward
Paul Gamsby's expulsion. After
feuding with the referee, Gams-
by threw, his stick at him and
earned himself a game miscon-
duct which will keep him out of
the game this Friday.
What is known is that Wis-
consin will be a tough oppon-
ent. Currently they are 2-4 after
splitting this past weekend with
Duluth, but despite the loss of
their two top goaltenders due to
graduation, Michigan will have
a tough time scoring against
them.
Freshman Jim Mackey has
been doing most of the tending
this year and he gets excellent
support from an experienced de-
fense. Along with all-American
John Jagger, the Badgers have
Jeff Rotsch and two-year Vet-
eran Dan Gilchrist to hold, off
the Wolverines.
After taking two weeks off for
finals and Christmas, Michigan
will see action in the Great
Lakes Tournament, Dec. 29 and
30 in Detroit. Other partici-
pants will include Michigan
Tech, Brown and Colgate.
Immediately after, on Jan. 1
and 2, the Wolverines travel to
Buffalo, N.Y. to compete in the
Nichols Tournament.
Syvracuse
'racist'
SYRACUSE, N.Y. 'M)-A special
committee appointed to investi-
gate charges of racism leveled
against the Syracuse University
football coaching staff has found
the penalizing of black athletes
who boycotted spring practice
"was an act of institutional rac-
ism," according to a student news-
paper.
Dialog, a Syracuse student-
owned news journal edited and
published by Alan Stamm, a
member of the 12-man committee,
said the text published in editions
dated today was unofficial but
had been reviewed and edited by
the whole committee last week.

7ekeddisaster

272-0007-BEETHOVEN
9 SYMPHONI ES
KARAJAN/BPO

$1995.

HOURS: BOTH STORES: Mon.-Fri. 9:30-9; Sat., 9:30-6

* Sundays, Noon-5

I'

Why doesn't
General Electric sell
to the cities instead i
newgadgetstothe

After thirty years or more of
neglect, there's no question our cities
need help.
But what kind of help?
Will another thousand sanitation
men be the answer to dirty streets?
Will doubling the police force
finally bring crime under control?
Can new rent laws force
landlords to provide more low-
income housing?
All the old, obvious ideas have
been tried. What's needed are new
ideas and new technological
developments.
General Electric has been
working on the problems of cities for
a number of years now. And in that
time we've come up with some
things we think will help.
Garbage
General Electric research has
come up with what is probably the
most revolutionary idea in garbage
disposal in years. Our scientists are
working toward a process by which a
special strain of bacteria converts
garbage into a high-protein food
for cattle.
The process is still something of
a "laboratory trick," but it could be
in.the pilot-plant stage in as little
as three years.

Crime
You might not expect a company
like General Electric to be doing
anything about crime.
But the fact is, GE has been
working with the Syracuse police,
looking for a new approach to the
problem. Our scientists there came
up with a whole new concept in
police organization called "Crime
Control Teams."
In their first year, these teams
were credited with cutting crime
62% in one large, representative
neighborhood of Syracuse. And the
concept has since been adopted by a
number of other cities.
Housing
To meet the critical need for
new low-income housing, General
Electric is participating in the
Department of Housing and Urban
Developrment's Operation
Breakthrough.
While GE has no intention of
going into commercial home
building, we do hope to supply the
builder-developer with new products
needed to improve his efficiency.
We now have several design
prototypes of advanced, modular
homes that can be assembled in a
matter of hours.
These are just a few of the new
ideas General Electric has come up

newideas
uburbs?
"gadgets" to help people.
We don't think our home
products are at all unnecessary or
frivolous. If they seem that way, it's
because people have forgotten how
much they rely on them. To wash
dishes. To wash clothes. To keep
warm. To keep cool. To entertain.
And on and on.
New ideas for the cities and
new "gadgets" for the home both
have the same end in mindafter all.
To help people live better.
Why are we running this ad?
We're running this ad, and
others like it, to tell you the things
General Electric is doing to solve
the problems of man and his
environment today.
The problems concern us
because they concern you. We're a
business and you are potential
customers and employees.
But there's another, more
important reason. These problems
will affect the future of this country
and this planet. We have a stake in
that future. As businessmen. And,
simply, as people.
We invite your comments.
Please write to General Electric,
570 Lexington Ave., New York, N.Y.
10022.

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