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December 06, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.Page Eight;

THE MICHIGAN GAILY

Sunday, December f, 1970 41

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NEW LEGISLATURE:
Faculty criticizes
proposed LSA plan

-Associated Press
Oil rig burns
A Shell Oil official compares a picture of a rig with the still
burning remains of the structure after an explosion and subse-
quent fire earlier this week claimed four lives in the Gulf of
Mexico south of New Orleans.E
PROFESSORS DISMISSED:
Fresno State police
ock up English dept.

(Continued from Page 1)
This position was unanimously
endorsed Tuesday by the execu-
tive council of the literary col-
lege student government, which
called upon the committee to
submit only the original propos-
al.
"Further advisory structures
(as called for by the alternate
proposal) will not change the
decision-making position of stu-
dents and does not represent a
viable alternative to the ori-
ginal proposal," the executive
council said in its resolution.
The committee meets tomor-
row to decide whether to pre-
sent one or two drafts to the
faculty.
Established at the April meet-
ing of the faculty, the commit-
tee was directed to draft a plan
for a student-faculty council
which would exist as a standing
committee of the governing fa-
culty.
But by the end of June, the
ten members of the committee
had reached general agreement
on proposing that the council
have considerably more author-
ity than faculty had suggested.
Following an open hearing on
the legislature proposal in Aug-
ust, faculty members began sub-
mitting strongly critical com-
ments on the tentative draft.
Urging a rejection of the pro-
posal, economics Prof. Gardner
Ackley said he did not believe
students should be allowed to
participate in legislative decis-
ions. Students, he said, do not
"possess the maturity, exper'-
ience and sound judgment need-
ed" for such decisions.
"I have participated in enough
joint student-faculty sessions to
fear the possibility that even a
relatively small number of stu-
dent activists might - through
irrelevancies; obstructionism,
emotionalism, and know-noth-
ingism - paralyze sensible dis-
cussion and decision-making,"
Ackley continued.
He maintained that such a
development would prompt "the
more sober and serious students
and faculty" to resign from the
Assembly, allowing it "to become
the almost exclusive forum of
student extremists."

In another memo, Prof. David
Segal expressed concern that the.
veto power granted to the fa-
culty is not "adequate." "I do
not believe it should fall to the
Governing Faculty to call an
extraordinary meeting within 15
days of the passage of an As-
sembly action to prevent t h a t
action from taking effect," he
said.
"Presumably, the disruption
of a single faculty meeting could
prevent the faculty from over-
ruling an action of the Assembly
before it took effect," Segal add-
ed. "Our students have all too
frequently demonstrated that
they are not above disruption."
Meanwhile, the student mem-
bers of the committee which
drafted the proposal express
their own reservations about the
plan, particularly criticizing the
faculty's retention of the veto
power and the power to take le-
gislative action which w o u 1 d
supercede the action of the As-
sembly.
However, they feel that ac-
ceptance of the proposal would
represent a significant improve-
ment over the current structure.
"If it is accepted, things will
be a lot better than now - but
that isn't saying much," says
Brian Ford, vice president of
the LSA student government
and co-chairman of the govern-
ance committee.
David Brand, president of the
LSA student government and a
committee member, believes that
the faculty's acceptance of the
alternate draft would. seriously
hurt future attempts to bring
about the creation of a stu-
dent- faculty legislature.
"It would stop debate on the
issue," Brand says. He believes
the committee should present
the faculty with only the ori-
ginal draft.
History Prof. Samuel Barnes,
a member of the committee who
helped draft the alternative pro-
posal, feels that if the second
draft were not presented to the
faculty along with the original
one, they would adopt 'a pro-
posal which would be similar
to the second draft but "might
not be as good."
.wr:;r " ,wr.-t_ ~~ .-- .r wr._

Cairo blacks,
police clash
CAIRO, Ill. (/)-About 50 armed
policemen and special deputies
clubbed and arrested black pickets
outside white businesses'in down-
town Cairo last night.
Several pickets were reported
injured in the disorder. A special
deputy was reported wounded by
gunfire elsewhere in this racially-
troubled city on the southern tip
of Illinois.
Leonard Boscarine, a newsman
for the Cairo Evening Citizen who
witnessed the disorder, said the
pickets were peacefully demon-
strating against white downtown
merchants.
He said the police-who he de-
scribed as white men wearing hel-
mets and carrying nightsticks and
guns-waded into the pickets to
make arrests when a shot was
fired. Boscarine did not know who
fired the shot.
They then clubbed the pickets,
he said.
The United Front, a black com-
munity group, has been leading a
black boycott of downtown mer-
chants for two years, demanding
more jobs for blacks.

BLACK REL610US EXPERIENCE
(A SERIES OF LECTURES)
TUES., DEC. 8, 7:30 p.m., Residential College, Rm. 124
"STYLES OF BLACK PREACHING"
PROFESSOR WARREN, Vanderbilt University
THURS., DEC. 10, 8 p.m., St. Andrew's Episcopal Church
306 N.-Division (across from Jones School)
"BLACK THEOLOGY AND THE
RENEWAL OF THE CHURCH"
PROFESSOR JAMES CONE, Union Theological Seminary
Author: "Black Theology and Black Power" and
"A Black Theoloay of Liberation"

Send check or money order'
No COD's
PPD
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P.O. Box 1849
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For the student body:
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PEA COATS
$25
Sizes 34 to 46
State Street at Liberty

Office of Religious Affairs

2282 SAB

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(Continued from Page 1)
48 arrests were made last May
after a six-lane highway in front
of the college was blocked in pro-
test of the previous faculty dis-
missals.
Also dismissed this week was
Prof. Ed Dutton, who declared he
was being disciplined for his in-
volvement in farm labor organi-
zing activities.
Joseph Toney, assistant chem-
istry professor, said his contract
was not being renewed because of
his backing of a black edition of
the school newspaper.
The other five faculty members
said they were told their contracts
would not be renewed after t h e
spring semester.
Zumwalt's removal as depart-
ment chairman is the latest de-
velopment in a long history of
conflict between the English de-
partment and the college's admin-
istration.
Last year Dr. Ralph Rea was ap-
pointed Dean of the Humanities

department despite the strong ob-
jections of the English faculty.
As Dean, Rea has come into
constant conflict with the English
department. He has been charged
with sending, "spies" into the
classrooms of some of the English
faculty and has admitted sending
his secretary to observe and take
notes of a class on one occasion.
Rea dismissed Frost Tuesday for
reasons Zumwalt described as "ca-
pricious". Among the reasons given,
them were Frost's discussing of
college problems with his students
and his serving as a draft coun-
selor.
Due to Zumwalt's popularity
with students, strong reaction to
his removal is expected. Students
and some faculty members gather-
ed in small groups near the Eng-
lish department Friday. No inci-
dents, were reported, but police
said they;took precautions to pre-
vent any disruptions.
Zumwalt said he is against vio-
lence and that he hopes the cam-
pus will remain peaceful.

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