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December 04, 1970 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-12-04

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Friday, December 4, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Sever'

Friday, December 4, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

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WILDFLOWER
AT LEAST
20Off
EVERYTHING IN THE STORE
(CHECK OUT OUR 50c HATS)
WILDFLOWER
LAST 2 DAYS Fri. & Sat. OlY 516 E. William

MY LAI ONLY THE LATEST

Massacres

part

of

m

Used

Equipment

Sale

WASHINGTON (A') - T h e
My Lai atrocities, if they did
occur, are not unusual in Amer-
ican history. What is unusual is
that charges have been filed and
men are being brought to court
martial.
Although Americans h a v e
been punished for isolated atro-
cities in time of war, the men
accused of wiping out the South
Vietnamese hamlet of My Lai
probably are the f i r s t to be
court-martialed o n massacre
charges. E
The first massacre in Ameri-
can history was committed by
the same Spanish force which
established St. Augustine, Fla.,
the nation's oldest city.
The Spaniards wiped out a ri-
val French settlement at Ft.
Caroline on Sept. 30, 1566. Even
the sick were hauled from their
beds and slain. The slaughter
continued along the Florida'
coast for several w e e k s until
more than 500 were dead.
"I put Jean Ribaut the French
leader and all the rest of them
to the knife," reported Don Pe-
dro Menendez de Aviles, "judg-
ing it to be necessary to the ser-
vice of the Lord our God and of
Your Majesty."
In 1622 Opechancanough, bro-
ther of Powhattan, decided to
drive the Europeans back into
the sea. In a surprise attack 357
English settlers were killed on
March 22.
The English spent the next
two years destroying Indian vil-
lages in retaliation, but Opech-
ancanough was n o t deterred.
Twenty y e a r s later, he tried
again and killed 500 settlers.

The English repeated their ear-
lier performance and this time
managed to kill the Indian lead-
er.
When a Boston trader was
killed by Indians in -1636, the
Massachusetts Puritans respond-
ed by attacking a Pequot In-
dian camp on the Mystic River
and slaughtering 500 men, wo-
men and children.
Land speculators trying to
steal Indian hunting grounds
brought on N e w England's
bloodiest war and destruction of
the Narragansetts who stood in
their way.
In a surprise attack Dec. 19,
1675, on the principal Narra-
gansett village, some 300 wo-
men and children were massa-
cred. Most of the braves escap-
ed to join the Nipmucks, but
this put the Nipmucks in a food
crisis and brought on more war.
The whites stopped this threat
by slaughtering the village of
Peskeompskut in May 1676.
For the next two centuries the
Indians resisted land grabs but
they consistently lost. The worst
Indian slaughter was dealt by
Andrew Jackson against Creeks
who sided with the British in
the war of 1812.
In t h e Battle of Horseshoe
Bend on March 27, 1814, more
than 800 Creeks were killed -
fourt times the number of whites
who died with Custer. Jackson
forced the few survivors to sign
over half their land.
When white settlers decided
they wanted Indian land in the
Illinois plains country, a white
mob fell upon the main Sauk
village in the spring of 1829 and

drove the natives f r o m their
corn fields. Other Indians took
the hint and fled across the
Mississippi River. But after a
miserable winter in Iowa with-
out food or shelter, Chief Black
Hawk decided to return his peo-
ple to their homeland.
On April 6, 1832, Black Hawk
and 1,000 followers returned to
the Rock River Valley, only to
run into a militia army. Black
Hawk'tried to surrender but was
answered by fire from a gun-
boat. For three hours the fron-
tiersmen drove the Indians into
the river at bayonet point, then
shot them as they struggled in
the water. Only 150 were taken
alive.
Discovery of gold in Colorado
sent thousands of miners Ito

U.. h
caves or dig into the sand, but
they were dragged out and kill-
ed.
Black Kettle and a h'andful
of braves escaped, but left be-
hind the mangled bodies of 450
Indians, most of them women
and children.
"They were scalped," a wit-
ness reported, "Their brains
knocked out; the men used their
knives, ripped open women,
clubbed little children, knocked
them in the head with their
guns, beat their brains out, mut-
ilated their bodies in every sense
of the word.
"The colonel all the time in-
citing his troops to their dia-
bolical outrages.",
For the first time public and
official opinion w e r e aroused

In the cold dawn of Nov. 27,
1868, Custer stormed the village
and slew nearly 200 men, wo-
men and children. This .t i m e
Black Kettle, the luckless peace-
maker, was among the dead..
In a letter to the: St. Louis
Democrat, one of. Custer's offi-_
cers described the scene that
followed:
". ..Little has been., done
save the work of the first hour.
That which cannot., be. taken.
away must be destroyed. Eight.
hundred ponies are to be put to.
death. Our chief exhibits his
close sharpshooting and terri-
fies the crowd of frightened
captured squaws and papooses
by dropping the straggling Pon-
ies near them.
"The last pony is killed The

is tory

.4

1a

RECEIVRS-AMPS-TUNERS

1

Ampex 1100 Auto Reverse
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When a Boston trader was kille d by Indians in 1636, the Massachu
setts Puritans responded by attack ing a Pequot Indian camp on t h e
Mystic River and slaughtering 500 men, women and children.
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1 Dyna 120-$125
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2 SPEAKERS
2 PR Marantz IMP lI-$130 each
3. TAPE RECORDERS AND DECKS
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1 Ampex 1200 Wal & Portable
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1 Ampex 900 Auto Reverse
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1 Concord MK IlIl Demo-$199
1 Viking 77 Portable--$70
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2 Garrard SLX-2's Demo-$59.50
1 Garrarl X-11 Demo-$27.95
1 Garrard 408 Demo-$37.50
1 Garrard 30-$30
1 Garrard 50-$30

ALSO-Sale onall Demo Portable and Table Radios at
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Cheyenne and Arapaho lands.
After three years of warfare the
Indians tried to lay down their
arms in the autumn of 1864.
Chief Black Kettle turned to
Gov. John Evans, who said the
war must go on. Black Kettle
then tried to surrender to the
federal government and settled
his tribe in a camp on Sand
Creek near Ft. Lyon, where he
thought he had been guaran-
teed sanctuary.
During the night of Nov. 28.
as 500 unsuspecting Indians
slept, 1,000 Colorado militiamen
under Col. John Chivington, a
former Methodist preacher, sur-
rounded the camp.
At dawn the soldiers charged,
shooting and tomahawking ev-
ery Indian in sight. The Indi-
ans were driven across the camp,
down into the dry bed of Sand
Creek and back against the high
banks on the other side. Women
and children tried to hide in
The1
other
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No feminine spray
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That's the reason you need
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Get Norforms protection for
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The second deodorant.

enough to question a massacre.
Two congressional committees
investigated and the Army held
a court of inquiry.
"In going over t h e battle-
ground the next day I did not
see a body of man, woman, or
child but was scalped," testi-
fied 1st. Lt.!J a m e s Cannon,
"and in many instances their
bodies were mutilated in t h e
most horrible manner.''
"Children two or three months
old," said Janes Smith, an in-
terpreter, "all ages lying there,
from sucking infants up to war-
riors."
"Next morning after the bat-
tle," recalled Cpl. Amos Miksch,
"I saw a little boy covered up
among the Indians in a trench.
still alive. I saw a major in the
Third Regiment take out his
pistol and blow off the top of
his head."
No action was ever taken"
against Chivington or anyone
else.
Black Kettle ,apparently did.
not learn enough from the ex-
perience. After another Indian
war he signed the Treaty of
Medicine Lodge. But an army
under C o 1. George Armstrong
Custer stumbled across Black,
Kettle's trail.in afresh snow-
fall and followed it to a 'camp
in the Washita Valley in In-
dian Territory.

DANIEL'S JEWELRY CO.
AUTHORIZED KEEPSAKE
JEWELER N ANN ARBOR
201 S. MAIN Mon &

huge fire dies out. And as, the
brave band of the SeventCay-
alry strike up the air, 'Ain't' T
Glad To Get Out Of The Wild-
erness,' we slowly pick our .waY
across the creek over which we
charged so gallantly in .the ear-
ly morn.
"Take care! Do not. trample
on the dead bodies of that wo-
man and child lying there!".
The final massacre of the In,:
dian wars came in 1890 after
the Teton Sioux of:'South- Da-
kota,'aced with starvation;
turned to a medicine mran who
promised t h a t certain dances
and rites would lead to return
of their lands and disappearance
of the whites.
The whites took alarmr :t the
"Ghost Dances," and Ar-ay ef-
forts to stop the dncing craze
brought resistance a d the
death of a number of warpiors,
including Sitting 1 .
Sitting Bull's foloes 1 e d
from their reservationv to;join
another Sioux^ band.- "tied-
eral troops caught. thbm Within
a few days and toqk, them-to a
camp on Wounded Xnee Creek.
During a bungling:Axrm at-
tempt to disarm the Sioi, a
shot was fired and 200 arriors,
women and children were mow-
ed down by machineguns.

OVER 25,000 LP'S, OVER 300 LABELS IN STOCK
WATCH FOR SPECIAL SALE
ITEMS CHANGING WEEKLY
discount eords
1235 S. UNIVERSITY 6 300 S. STATE 0 ANN ARBOR,
668-9866 665-3679 'MICH.

FREE NORFORMS MINI-PACK
plus informative booklet! Write:
Norwich Pharmacal Co.. Dept. CN-A,
Norwich, N.Y. 13815. (Enclose 25
' for mailing, handling.)
Name
Street
City
' StateZip
Do' forget your zip code. 2

,1

MILES DAVIS-AT FILLMORE

READY FOR

SLY AND THE
FAMILY STONE
GREATEST HITS
NOW ONLY
$359
EACH
Mile & Sly on Sale Tuesday Only
Sale Ends Saturday, Dec. 5, 1970

\JNOW/

.
: , j
'. $ j.
:. ;.
S . ' ; i
. . ;
. ,. y:.
c r'"
. :.,, ' r

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When you know
it's for keeps
Happily, all your special moments together will be
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wedding rings. If the name, Keepsake is in the
ring and on the tag, you are assured of fine g"tv
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diamond is flawless, of superb color, and precise
cut. Your Keepsake Jeweler has a selection of
many lovely styles. He's in the yeilow
pages under "Jewelers."
REGISTERED DIAMOND RFNGS
Rings from $100 to $10 000, TM Re. A. . Pond Company
- - - - - - - - - - -.-.-.-.-.-.-. ...

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Keep warm and dry in snow country with a pair

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