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December 03, 1970 - Image 7

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, Dete ber 31 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page SevenM

T h ur d ~ y D e c m b e 3, 9 7 0T H E I C H G A N A I L

Pistons

roll

over

Knicks

By The Associated Press
DETROIT - Dave Bing and!
Jimmy Walker led the scoring as-
sault last night as the Detroit Pis-G
tons snapped the New York
Knicks' six-game winning streak
101-82. in a National Basketball
Association game.
Bing whipped in 29 points while
Walker added 22 as the Pistons
recovered from a slow start to#
gain the lead in the second quar-
ter when they knocked in eight!
straight points and remained in
front the rest of the way.
The Pistons took a 55-47 half-
time lead, before breaking the
game wide open in the final
period.

j Montreal's other scores were by
Guy LaPointe and Cournoyer.
* * *
dlailyF
Rangers dump Blues
NEW YORK - The New York
p o Rangers, stopped cold most of the
first two. periods, exploded with
NIGHT EDITOR: three, last-period goals and whip-
JIM KEVRA ped the St. Louis Blues 4-2 last
night in the National Hockey
League.
sixth straight National Basketball The only offense New York was
Association victory. able to manage was a tip-in shot
Don Chaney added two free by Ted Irvine at 5:02 of the sec-
throws with two seconds left after ond period as Blues' netminder

third period, gave the Chicago Goldsworthy got the winner on
Black Hawks a 4-3 victory over a power play at 4:31 of the second
the Boston Bruins in a fight- period.
filled National Hockey League * * *
game last night. Pros pummel Pacers
Phil Esposito, the league's lead-
ing scorer, picked up all of Bos- INDIANOPOLIS-The Memphis
ton's goals with a three-goal hat Pros outscored Indiana 11-1 in the
trick, final two minutes last night and
The victory, which extended the whipped the Pacers 106-100 in an
Amaia BRertalAanarv

i

the Celtics let
an uncontested
The winning

Jerry West score
layup.
streak is the long-

The New York scoring total was est for the Celtics since December,
the lowest of the season for the 1967. Havlicek led the Celtics in
defending champions whose pre- scoring with 20 points. Wilt
vious low was 91 points against Chamberlain and West had 29
Baltimore two weeks ago. points for the Lakers.
Willis Reed with 17 points top- * * *

-Associated Press
DAVE DE BUSSCHERE, star forward for the New York Knickerbockers, gets off a pass in last
night's game against the Detroit Pistons as Erwin Muller attempts to block the ball. DeBus-
schere's 11 points weren't enough as the Knicks fell to the red-hot Pistons, 101-82. Dave Bing had
29 to lead the Pistons in scoring.

ped the Knicks.
Celtics sink Lakers
BOSTON - JoJo White hit a
20-foot jump shot in the closing
moments last night and John
Havlicek added a clutch free throw
with six seconds to play as the
Boston Celtics defeated the Los
Angeles Lakers 114-111 for their
"'tin

ON FRENCH SEPARATISM

ProU
By TERRI FOUCHEY
Heightened awareness of his
situation in society, and of the
operation of that whole society
surrounding him is slowly be-
coming the stereotype of t h e
college athlete. His knowledge
(and intelligent conversation)
no longer ends with the f i n e
points of his sport, but he can,
and will, in guarded comments,
talk about the world around the
playing field and how he feels
about it.
This has been especially ob-
vious in the actions and words of
black athletes across the na-
tion. Last spring's BAM strike at
Michigan is an example of this.
However, this awareness and
willingness to speak and act
is not restricted to black ath-
letes alone.
Recent occurrences in Can-
ada made the world take a se-
cond look and give a second
thought to the whole French-
Canadian situation. Several
Michigan athletes come f r o m
Quebec. Two members of the
hockey team, junior forward,
Bernie Gagnon and junior de-
fenseman Punch Cartier, d i s-
cuss growing up in this situa-
tion, their views of the recent
happenings, and the French-
Canadian separatist movement.
GAGNON DESCRIBES t h e
basic situation. "What the sep-
aratist movement wishes is a
Quebec separate from the rest
of Canada, economically, soc-
ially, and culturally." There are
several organizations working
towards separation. "Very few
people support the FLQ (Front
de Liberation du Quebec). How-
evr, 24 per cent voted for the
moderate PQ (Parti Quebecois)
in the election last April." The
PQ wishes to separate through
legal procedure and proclaims;
long-term goals for separation.
S 'He' continues, "Montreal is
two-thirds French, one-third
English, and yet there are three
English universities and only
one French university to serve
the majority of the population.
French Canadians are demand-
ing that the federal governmnt
wake up to their needs. We're
asking for justice in the laws
and the opportunities offered
us."
Gagnon dos not feel that con-
ditions are such that he is or
has been treated as a second
class citizen. "We have to work
as hard as an Englishman to
get a job. There are some sim-
ilarities with the black situation
in, the U.S., but that is by far
worse that what we have en-
dured."
One of the similarites he does
feel exists is the fact that the
non-violent m-thod emoloyed in
the early Civil Rights Move-

Quebec,

icen.4

-7

i ., 1v

ment is probably th way through
which French Canadians w i 11
gain equality.
This more moderate stance is
why he feels the PQ holds the
key to Quebec's future. "Most
older people have turned against
both the FLQ and the PQ. The
English, in fact, think that the
recent trouble has brought
Canada togethr. However, t h e
youth still supports the PQ and
they are French Canada's fu-
ture."
ANOTHER REASON he be-
lieves youth will be the van-
guard is that education is one
of the necessary steps to gain-
ing the separatist goal. "T h e
French system used to allow col-
leg entrance after 11 grades,
but the government has chang-
ed it to be closer to the English.
Now it is required that stu-
dents in French schools go to 13
grades, with the thirteenth
grade becoming equivalent to
the first year of college.
The English system is similar
to the American with 12 grades
and then college. This change
has hurt a great many people,
especially those between 18 and
21. It will also be hampered by
the fact that there will now be
more people prepared for college
and still the same amount of
French Universities. The fed-
eral government, along with en-
acting this change should also
spend more to create more
French univeristies and raise
the subsidies of existing univer-
sities."
Gagnon thinks that separa-
tion cannot be achieved u n t il
American investment has been
removed from Quebec and he
feels that economically is the
only way through which French
Canada can obtain its independ-
ence.
Education is important be-
cause we can use it to get into
the English and America con-'
trolled systems and succeed and
gain independence. It's basically
using all the opportunities they
present us within their own sys-
tems and helping ourselves with
the results afterwards."
* * * -
PUNCH CARTIER takes a
more militant view, but not to
the point where he is ready to
kidnap someone . "Everything's
involvd in this, our language,
culture, education system. I see
many similarities to the black
struggle in America. We're try-
ino, to assert our own identity
just as they are and to have a
say in what becomes of us."
He adds, "Canada is a strat-
ified society and we're the strat-
um that has to reach up to the
standards of the English. If
we apply for a job in Montreal,

w hav to be bi-lingual, the Eng-
lish don't."
His sympathies lie with t h e
FLQ, but he agrees with Gagnon
that moderate, non-violent tac-
tics will gain more. "FLQ is
faster, but it won't get any-
where. I kind of dig the FLQ,
but it's a situation where we
have to outmouth them, rather
than shoot them. In my mind,
the PQ is existing, the FLQ is
living."
The most important part of his
heritage is his language. "I don't
want to lose my language. It's
the part of my culture that I
especially want to pass on to
my children. It is also the one
area where entering the English
Canadian system demands
weakening the cultural link.
"In order to get a start in any
area, from school to a job, one
has to be bi-lingual. One of the
most important" points of the
separatist idea to me is the fact
that the French schools and
universities could concentrate on
French culture and still be sub-
sidized equally and eventually
work up to the level of the Eng-
lish system. If they give us the
opportunity for education, or if
we make the opportunity our-
selves, we'll show that we can
do as much as an Englishman,
without being bi-lingual."
CONCERNING recent events,
Cartier sees them as initiating a
panic of opinion against all sep-
aratist organizations. "The
whole affair ridicules what the
PQ had been doing prior to that
time. The twenty-four per cent
vote is evidence that a great
many people support the PQ.
Most people felt that the PQ
had been doing a good job un-
til the FLQ started.
"After that many who had
been sympathetic, if not sup-
portive, turned against the
whole separatist movement, not
just the radicals who had in-
stigated the trouble. It's a pan-
icky reaction, but now the ma-
jority have lumped the two
groups together and will no
longer be sympathetic with even
the moderate aims of the PQ."
Cartier agrees with Gagnon
that youth will be in the fore-
front of the movement for a
sparate Quebec. "Since it's deal-
ing with long term change
youth are really the only ones
who can carry it through and
so they and their support a r e
vital to the separatist move-
ment."
THE PRIME MINISTRY of
Pierre Trudeau has not helped
the cause of French Canadian
separatism in any way, he
feels. "I don't like him, because
he hasn't really done anything

special. For all he's done for us
it's the same as having an Eng-
lishman as prime minister.
Many observers outside of
Canada think that the ultimate
aim of a separate Quebc is to
eventually unite with F r a n c e.
Cartier disagrees, "Quebec gain,
ing their independence has no
relation with France. W h e n
DeGaulle made that 'vive Que-
bec libre' statement a few years
ago, he had no right to because
it's none of his business.
Cartier's ambition is to some-
day play pro hockey. If he plays
for an American team he in-
tends to retain his Canadian
citizenship. "I'm a Canadian, a
French Canadian and if there's
any way I can help the French-
man, I'd love to do it."

Sonics dethrone Royals
CINCINNATI-Don Kojis, with
30 points, led the Seattle Super-
Sonics back from a 25 point half-
time deficit to upend the Cincin-
nati Royals 119-111 in a National
Basketball Association contest last
night.
Seattle, down 66-41 at the half,
outscored Cincinnati 75 to 45 in
the second half.
The game was halted in the
third period when a fight broke
out between the Royals' Johnny
Green and Tom Meschary.
Green had scored all his 19
points in the first half.
Pete Cross, 6-foot-9 Seattle
center, put the game away with
a late layup making it 115-109.
Cincinnati's Norm Van Lier-
haer had 22 points and 17 assists.
* * *
Penguins, Canadiens tie
PITTSBURGH-Pete Mahovlich
scored on a rebound shot midway
in the third period to give the
Montreal Canadiens a 3-3 tie with
the Pittsburgh Penguins in a Na-
tional Hockey League game last
night.
The Penguins held a 3-2 lead
scoring all their goals within nine
minutes of the second period, two
by Ken Schinkel, the Penguins
leading scorer with 20 points and
another by Nick Harbaruk.
Mahovlich took a rebound of a
shot by Yvan Cournoyer and drill-
ed it past goalie Les Binkley for
the tying goal.

1
_
I
t
i
t
}
I
i
1
r;
,',

Ernie Wakley battled the Rangers
with acrobatic goal-tending.
But Ron Stewart scored in the'
third period on a breakaway shot
and Jean Ratelle and Dave Balon
added the crushers later in the
stanza.
Jim Lorentz and Jim Roberts
had third-period goals for the
Blues.
The victory extended the Rang-
ers' home ice streak to 12 games
without a loss.
* * *
Leafs annihilate Kings
TORONTO - tree goals by,
Dave Keon, including two while
Toronto was a man short, and
shutuot goaltending by 41-year-
old Jacques Plante last night car-
ried the Toronto Maple Leafs to
a 7-0 National Hockey League
victory over the Los Angeles Kings.
The two short-handed goals
were the fifth and sixth Keon has
scored this year.
Ron Ellis, with two, Darryl Sit-
tIer and Norm Ullman were the
other Toronto scorers.
Plante's shutout, the first by a
Toronto goalie this year, was the
74th of his career.
* * *
Hawks bump Bruins
CHICAGO-Dennis Hull's sec-
ond goal of the night, early in the

Hawks' unbeaten streak on homeI
ice to 13, moved them six points!
ahead of St. Louis in the West.I
Boston dropped into a first place
tie with New York in the East.
The night's main brawl broke
out late in the first period with
the score tied at 2-2. Chicago's
Jim Pappin and Bruin defense-
man Don Awrey came together at
the Chicago blue line and soon
fists were flying.
Both benches emptied shortly
thereafter and referee John Ash-
ley issued five minute penalties to
Awrey, Johnny McKenzie and Ted
Green of the Bruins and to Pap-
pin, Keith Magnuson and Dan
Maloney of the Hawks.
Maloney and Lou Angotti scored'
Chicago's other goals.
North Stars shine
MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL -
Bill Goldsworthy ended a 16-game
goal-scoring slump last night with,
a tie breaker that thrust the Min-
nesota North Stars over the Cali-
fornia Seals 3-2 in a National
Hockey League game topped off
by a wild, free-for-all fight.
Both benches cleared as fights
erupted across the ice with three
minutes to play. Tom Reed of the
North Stars and Tony Feather-
stone of the Seals started the
brawl.
Referee Ron Wicks dished out
32 minutes in penalties and eject-
ed Goldsworthy and California's
Dennis Hextall, who engaged in
the longest battle.

american asketbaii association
game.

.1

Steve Jones and James Jones
paced the Pros with 24 and 21
points. Both scored 15 points in
the second half as Memphis made
a one-point halftime edge stand-
up.
Leading scorers for Indiana
were Bob Netolicky and Freddie
Lewis with 22 each.
"
Nagel quits
Iowa position
By The Associated Press
DAVENPORT -- University of
Iowa football coach Ray Nagel an-
nouncd that he would not seek an
extension of his contract which
expires on I)ecember 21, of this
'year. He led the Hawkeys to a
16-32-2 record during his five
year stay at the university.
In stepping down after five con-
troversial years that saw the 43
yar old ex-UCLA standout move
from one crisis to another, Nagel
lauded the school's football pro-
gram. "In my five .years at Iowa
the program has made great suc-
cess. It is a healthy football pro-
gram and one of the strongest in
the Big Ten. The future is very
bright."
Iowa went 3-6-1 in 1970 and fih-
ished fourth in the Big Ten, i t s
highest placing in ten years.

Professional League Standings

NHL
East Division
W L T Pt'
Boston 14 5 4 32
New York 14 5 4 32
Montreal 11 8 4 26
Vancouver 10 13 3 23
Detroit 8 11 3 19
Toronto 7 15 1 15
Buffalo 4 13 4 12
West Division
Chicago 15 4 5 35
St. Louis 11 4 7 29
Minnesota 11 8 3 25
Philadelphia 10 10 2 22
Pittsburgh. 5 10 9 19
Los Angeles 8 12 1 17
California 6 16 2 14
Yesterday's Results
Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 3
Toronto 7, Los Angeles 0
New York 4, St. Louis 2
Chicago 4, Boston 3
Minnesota 3, California 2

s. GF GA
98 60
72 50
77 60
77 91
68 77
73 83
39 75

Milwauk
Detroit
Chicago
Phoenix
San Fra
Los Ang
San Die
Seattle
Port land

Western Conference
Midwest Division
Kee 18 3 .857
17 10 .629
13 8 .619
z 14 12 .538
Pacific Division
ncisco 15 10 .600
geles 13 9 .590'
ego 15 13 .464
13 14 .480
d 9 19 .321

87
54
54
55
64
56
51

50
42
54
57
69
73
85

Yesterday's Results
Boston 114, Los Angeles 111
Seattle 119, Cincinnati 111
Detroit 101, New York 82
Atlanta at Phoenix, inc.
Only games scheduled.
Today's Games
Chicago at Milwaukee

4
5
a/2
1Y2
3
7 4
GB
3
6% f
9
10
2
2
2
9

,
i 44
Presented By The
in Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor
FRIDAY, DEC. 4 at 8:30
SATURDAY, DEC. 5 at 8:30
SUNDAY, DEC. 6 at 2:30
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
MEMBERS OF THE INTERLOCHEN ARTS ACADEMY ORCHESTRA
LUCIA EVANGEL ISTA, Soprano JOHN McCOLLUM, Tenor
ELAINE BONAZZI, Contralto JEROME HINES, Bass
MARY McCALL STUBBINS, Organist
CHARLES FISHER, Harpsichordist
DONALD BRYANT, Conductor
TICKETS: $3.OO-2.50-2.OO-1.50
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR
Office Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 to 4:30; Sat. 9 to 12 (Telephone 665-3717)
(Also at Auditorium box office 1 / hours before performance time)

l
7
l
l
J
1
1

Today's Games
St. Louis at Montreal
Boston at Buffalo
Los Angeles at Detroit
Only games scheduled
NBA
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L Pet.
NeW York 21 8 .724
Boston 15 10 .600
Philadelphia 15 13 .536
Buffalo 7 17 .292
Central Division
Baltimore 14 12 .538
Cincinnati 9 14 .391
Atlanta 6 17 .261
Cleveland 1 26 .037

only game scheduled.
A BA
East Division
W L
Kentucky 18 6
Virginia 14 8
Floridians 11 12
New York 10i 11
Pittsburgh 10 16
Carolina 7 15
West Division
Utah 15 7
Memphis 13 9
Indiana 14 10
Denver 7 15
Texas 6 16

GB
4
5!/
11}
3 2
6
13!/2

Pet.
.750
.636
.478
.476
.384
.318
.682
.590
.583
.318
.273

Yesterday's Results
Kentucky 139, Pittsburgh 127
Virginia at Utah, inc.
Memphis 106, Indiana 100
Only games scheduled.
Today's Games
New York at Memphis
Virginia at Denver
Carolina vs. Floridians at Tampa
Only games scheduled.

., -- r - -: - --mow.- -w-_ ,-..r-. -. - _ - .- . ...- - . _ -. _. -.. .. e..- 1
.a .. , i.. t i ... mow, l i ..

49

T

T

The MICHELE (1100)
is a show stealing ladies' two-piece worm up
suit made of our whisper soft lustre-glo ny-
Ion, with a jacket front right pocket match-
ing a pant right rear pocket, all topped off
with plenty of fashionable stitching.
$80.00

m

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