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December 02, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

State & Liberty Sts.
DIAL 662-6264

ENDS TODAY!
Anthony Quinn as
"FLAP" GP
OPEN 12:45
Shows at 1:15-3-5-7-9 p.m.
Ladies 75c Today until 6 p.m.

page three

114P

ir 't ttn

tti1y

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

STARTS TOMORROW!
FRANK SINATRAANDGEORGE RNNEDE
"DIRTY DINGUSMABEWITH ANNE JKSM
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TOM WALDMAN & FRANK WALDMAN and JOSEPH HELLER Basedcn -heBalladd i nwusfaq.(
By DAVID MARKSON Produced and Directed By BURT KENNEDY PANAVISK*4ETROCOLOR
=MG=

Wednesday, December 2, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

I

I

news briefs

Laird says

U.

A

I

By The Associated Press

#4
.4
'4

paperbacks?.
the, university cellar?
You betcha,
lots of em
real cheap
in thme Union
a 769-7940
Ile n ili
Wednesday, December 2
MOON FLEET
Dir. FRITZ LANG (1955)
Stewart Granger, George Sanders, Joan Greenwood.
Dickensian story of an orphan boys love for the
dashing leader of a band of smugglers.
SHORT: "PRIDE OF PIKEVILLE" with BEN TURPIN
7 & 9 ARCH ITECTURE
662-8871 75c AUDITORIUM

THE ETHIOPIAN GOVERNMENT has decided to establish
diplomatic relations with Communist China.
The Nixon administration expressed concern and regret that
the move was made, a State Department spokesman said yesterday.
A spokesman for Nationalist China said that there is "no link
between Ethiopia's recognition of Peking and Nationalist China's
relations with other African countries."
* * *
AN EGYPTIAN MOTORBOAT on a nighttime intelligence-and-
smuggling mission was sunk by an Israeli patrol boat in the
northern Suez gulf, the military announced yesterday.
The incident -- the first of serious proportions on the Egyptian
front since the Middle East cease-fire took effect four months ago -
occurred early Saturday, a spokesman said. He stated he was unable
to give a reason for the delay in publication.
The boat was sunk near the Israeli-held shore of the gulf,. just
south of the Suez Canal, and all four Egyptian crewmen were killed,
he said.
Documents found on one of the three bodies recovered - the
fourth went down iwth the raft - proved the men were engaged in
intelligence work ,the spokesman said.
An investigation showed they also were smuggling hashish, he
added.
THE SENATE passed yesterday landmark legislation creating
a new federal agency to protect and serve the interest of the
nation's consumers.
The bill also creates a three-member Council of Consumer
Advisers within the executive office of the President.
Senate passage of the measure followed the defeat by lopsided
votes of amendments by Sen. Philip Hart, (D-Mich.), to permit
the new agency to bypass the Office of Management and Budget in
conducting research and to revise the way in which its leadershipt
will be chosen.
* * *
TEN EUROPEAN ALLIES agreed last night to aim at nearlyj
$1 billion in additional spending for defenses to ease the military
load of the United States.
This agreement emerged after some plain talking between the
British and West Germans who are the chief contributors to the
over-all program for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
It will be presented today to U.S. Defense Secretary Melvin Laird.
The significance of the European move was political rather than
military, to convince Washington that more is being done to ease
the U.S. burden.
UAW, TEAMSTERS, AF]

-Associated Press
PAUL McCRACKEN, chairman of the President's Council of
Economic Advisors and former business professor at the Univer-
sity, discusses the administration's inflationary alert at the White
House yesterday.

Union merger being con

t 'e - uprescue attempts
WASHINGTON (M - Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird
said the United States "will make further efforts to free our
prisoners" who are held in North Vietnam, and this includes
possible military action.
"I would not rule out any action," Laird said. "We are
going to make every kind of effort to free our prisoners of
war."
The Pentagon chief made this statement when reporters
asked if there might be another commando-type raid like the

)nmi cunilhits
ln mcco nlationary increases
HINGTON (P) - The Nixon administration hit hard yes-
new gasoline price boosts, at the proposed rail wage in-
.d at the new auto wage-price pattern - which, it said, will
imers $2.5 billion a year.
g a new tone in its second inflation alert, the White House
o "jawboning" - the pressure-by-publicity technique it has
eretofore.1
President's Council of Economic Advisers explained t h a t
ppears prices are rising less rapidly, "nevertheless, the rate
n remains higher than expected."
hift to easier money and lower interest rates got a nudge,
-_ --- -- meantime, when the interest rate
on government-insured h o m e
mortgages was cut from 8/2 per
cent to 8 per cent by the Federal
* Housing Administration and the
se reVeteran Administration.
I Gasoe prices shot up nearly
16 per cent in the week ended Nov.
meeting with the Team- 17, following a wave of crude oil
ting president, Frank price boosts, the Council said.
ons, t h e first such But the Council, which has op-
l conference since the posed any form of voluntary or di-
rs were kicked out of rect federal intervention in price-
L-CIO on corruption wage decisions, emphasized that it
in 1957. \ was not passing judgment on
and Fitzsimmons in- whether any specific wage or
ey discussed only a dis- price increases were justified.
e r jurisdiction among The Council said the three-year
kers, which they work- General Motors wage settlement,
their mutual satisfac- which ended a 67-day strike by
it was a major thaw- the United Auto Workers, "if gen-
lations. eralized throughout the economy"
ey to whether Meany would force costs and prices up-
vite the 2-million-mem- ward.
msters back is whether The inflation alert offered no
ued JamtsaHsfTeaster-judgment on the three-year rail-
eenext July. road wage package recommended
has sworn the Team- by
er will be taken back board, providing a yearly increase
ffa is president. averaging more than 9 per cent.

dramatic but fruitless descent
The Nixon administration is'
concerned about the prisoner of
war (POW) issue, Laird said, and
he intends to take it up at a meet-
ing of North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization (NATO) defense min-
isters in Brussels.
Laird talked to newsmen at An-
drews Air Force Base before tak-
ing off for the three-day NATO
meeting.
His words were echoed in Paris
by Ambassador David K. E. Bruce,
chief U.S. envoy to the Vietnam
peace talks there. Bruce told a
news conference the United States
will continue to seek the early re-
lease of American prisoners in
Vietnam "by all means available
to us."
"Hanoi and the Viet Cong must
understand, in"unmistakable
terms," Bruce said, "t h a t their
past and existing attitude on the
prisoner of war question is intol-
erable. We will continue to pursue
t h e twin objectives of humane
treatment and early release of our
men by all means available to us."
Bruce said the reaction of the
North Vietnamese and National
Liberation Front to President
Nixon'sOct. 7 proposal for im-
mediate and unconditional release
of all POWs on both sides "has
been totally negative."
"They show no concern for their
own men and flout our concern
for ours," he said.
North Vietnam's Premier Pham
Van Dong, in an interview pub-'
lished in the French newspaper
LeMonde, said the POW issue
could be resolved o n 1 y after
Washington decides to withdraw
all of its troops from South Viet-
nam.
Laird said he intends to impress
on the NATO allies the need for
strengthening their conventional
forces against the threat of the
Warsaw Pact nations.
He said this is a threat "which
must be met," and he repeated
that the United States will"'main-
tain our force capabilities" in
NATO at least through June 1972.
Laird said some small numbers
of U.S. troops may be withdrawn
from Europe, but if this is done
it will be offset by "the increase
of capabilities of weapons sys-
tems."
He said he hopes the Brussels
talks will lead to a decision by the
NATO European members to take
on a greater share of the defense
of Europe.

on Son Tay ten days ago.
Corp orations
blamed for
farm poverty
WASHINGTON (R) - A new
nonprofit investigative group said
yesterday that huge corporations
controlling the food industry pro-
fit from and actively seek to per-
petuate the poverty of farmwork-
ers.
The Agri-business Accountabil-
ity' Project said it intends to ex-
pose the links of big business to
the farmland and attempt to pin-
point how corporate influence de-
rails or stalemates federal at-
tempts to better the lot of the 2.6
million farmworkers.
The migrant and seasonal farm-
worker still is excluded from or
only partly covered by most fed-
eral laws protecting other work-
ers - unemployment compensa-
tion, child labor laws, fair 1 a b o r
standards, equal pay provisions
and the National Labor Relations
Act.
"But his own powerlessness is
not the only factor accountable
for the farmworker's plight," Pro-
ject spokesmen told a news con-
ference. "The other side of the
coin is the overwhelming political
power wielded against him by the
giant economic interests of agri-
culture.
The Project directors said there
is a dismal shortage of facts to
pierce the complex corporate own-
ership structures.
"For example, few are aware
that the Dow Chemical Corp.,
through its subsidiary, the D o w
Chemical Financial Corp., owns
17,000 acres of agricultural land in
California and Arizona, which it
purchased from Bud Antle, Inc., a
large corporate farmer in these
two states," the directors said.
The purchase in 1969 cost Dow
$5 million and gave it an invest-
ment in the second largest lettuce
shipper in the world, they said.
The Dow-Antle concern also was
described as the primary oppon-
ent of efforts by Cesar Chavez, the
leader of the AFL-CIO United
Farm Workers Organizing Com-
mittee.

T

lil

WASHINGTON (J)-Inform-
ed labor sources are voicing ]
strong speculation that the na-
tion's two largest unions-the
Teamsters and the United Auto ]
Workers (tAW) -- will rejoin
the AFL-CIO, possibly within a l
year.E
Such a move would bring vir-
tually all major unions under
one roof for the first time in
nearly 15 years, forming a mas-
sive organization of more than ]
17 million workers.
Nothing is official, and hitch-
es could develop, b u t sources
point to a number of major con- 1
siderations.
One is the desire for stronger 1
labor unity in the fade of what
union leaders view as a basical-
ly hostile Republican adminis-
tration in the White House -
ir

despite friendly overtures from
President Nixon.
Another is the death last May
of the UAW's president, Walter
Reuther, who pulled out of the
AFL-CIO two years ago in a
personality clash with its ven-
erable president, 76-year-o l d
George Meany.
Reuther's successor, Leonard
Woodcock, is said to have pri-
vately opposed the break and
has been friendly with Meany
since he took over.
The 1o s s of the 1.6-million
member UAW was a big one in
both money and manpower for
the AFL-CIO, reducing its to-
tal membership to the present
13.6 million workers in 121 un-
ions.
Another sign viewed as highly
significant was Meany's recent

Meany
sisted th
pute ov E
farm wor
ed out to
tion. But
ing of re
The ke
would inv
her Tean
imprison
nally squ
president
Meany
sters nev
while Ho

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY, December 2nd and 3rd
In cooperation with the DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH
The Department of Speech
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
PRESENTS TWO ORIGINAL ONE-ACTS

BLACK THEATRE-OPENS TONIGHT!

MIME SHOW
by GREGORY JARBOE

I

LADIES ROOM
by PATRICIA GRIFFITH

ron milner
WHO'S GOT HIS OWN
Directed by LEONARD SMITH of Wayne State University
at 8 P.M.-Wednesday-Saturday, Dec. 2-5
Mendelssohn Theatre-Box Office Opens 12:30

ARENA THEATRE, Frieze Building
I 4:10 P.M. or earlier if theatre is filled ADMISSION' FREE
IA
ti
RIGSFR I
Zoicsge 4 Ylo odAS

I

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
"a play of passionate fists and faces"-Walter Kerr

r

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:.: .. ..
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