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November 25, 1970 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-25

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ENDING,
WEDNESDAY

DIAL
8-6416

page three

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

TWIN FEATURE PROGRAM
:" ad

Wednesday, November 25, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

I *

THEYOUNG MAN ,
CIlIFORXGIRLS WHO'VE
COLOR BY DELUXE HAD EVERYTHING
STARTING THURSDAY
"One of the "QACKER
major movie '
surprises !EB
of the year!" W U
-Rex Reed, HOLIDAY MAGAZINE qw 04

I,

UMC
MKNS
00

-

IN"

CINEMA II
Walt Disney's
"DAVEY CROCKETT"
"LEGEN D OF SLEEPY HOLLOW"
"WIND IN THE WILLOWS"

I

ne.ws.briefs
By The Associated Press
ROCK-THROWING DEMONSTRATORS broke windows at
Stanford University Monday night in a protest of the U.S. bomb-
ing of North Vietnam last weekend.
About 200 persons on the 11,000 student campus attended a peace-
ful, one-hour rally at which speakers denounced the Indochina war
in general and the bombing in particular.
A crowd of 100, which witnesses said included some non-Univer-
sity students, then marched to the Aero-Astro building. The dem-
onstrators dispersed after breaking windows, before campus police
arrived.
* * *
GUINEA CHARGED TUESDAY that Portugese and merce-
naries again launched "many incursions" along the coast during
the night and were repulsed.
The broadcast from Conakry, the capital of Guinea, gave no in-
dication of whether fighting was still going on, but it did declare that
"The Fascist Portugese aggressor is still in Guinea's territorial waters."
Portugal has denied it was involved in the invasion.

Inflation hikes
cost of iving
WASHINGTON (2) - The largest increase in the cost of
living in the past six months - six tenths of one percent -
was announced yesterday by the federal government.
The White House expressed concern and said it will get
tougher in assigning specific blame for big wage-price hikes
- probably including the recent General Motors-United Auto
Workers settlement.
The Labor Department said the October rise in living
costs boosted the Consumer Price Index to 137.4. That meant
it took $137.40 per week last month to maintain a family
standard of living that c o s t

Thursday, Dec. 3
Friday, Dec. 4

Three Shows:
6:45, 9:00, 11:15

PLEASE NOTE CHANGES IN DAYS AND TIMES
Cinema 11 is sorry for the confusion in ads for last Saturday. The
Daily is solely to blame for this error, but we are as sorry as you
are that it happened.
SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ABOUT 50,000 LEGAL ABORTIONS were performed in New
York City in the first four months after the state abortion law
r was liberalized last July 1.
Figures for abortion-related deaths worked out to a rate of 221
per 100,000 abortions, a lower rate than in Britain or Scandavia, where
similar policies also prevail.
A YOUNG NAVY OFFICER who signed a petition to the
Pentagon objecting to the Vietnam war is getting his discharge
by order of a federal judge.}
"My objections to war are based on moral and philosophical
values that have crytalized since I have been in the military," Lt.!
Ronald McMahon said in an interview Tuesday.
In a detailed decision Monday, U.S. District Court Judge Gordon
Thompson said the Navy failed to prove in two hearings that Mc-
Mahon was not a bona fide conscientious objector.
The Navy based its case on the letter objecting to the Vietnam
war which McMahon had signed with 30 other officers. The group!
calls itself part of the Concerned Officers Movement. An assistant
U.S. attorney, Fred Holoboff, argued that they object "to a particulart
war, not war in general as set forth by the U.S. Supreme Court."E
* * *

-Associated Press
Fonda pickets with militants
Actress Jane Fonda joins the picket line in New Orleans with a
group marching in support of black militant squatters whom
police have tried to evict from city owned apartments.
CONSPIRACY CHARGED:
Trilof 8radicals
begitns in- Seattle

A GROUP OF U.S. COLLEGE students will leave New York
Nov. 29 determined to sign separate "peace treaties" with students
of North and South Vietnam.
Sponsored by the National Student Association, a six-man dele-
gation will go to Saigon while 10 other students will leave for Hanoi

i
1

TACOMA - The trial of the
Seattle 8, the second major Fed-
eral prosecution of radicals on
charges of conspiracy and viola-
tion of the antiriot act began here
Monday.
The charges are the result of
the defendants' reaction to the
first conspiracy trial. That was
the trial of the Chicago 8. Those
8 radicals were charged with

City council votes to install more
bicycle racks near campus area
By AARON HOSTYK tickets given to bikes parked on Olsen said, "I have personally
More bicycle racks will be in- sidewalks. "By whatever force this suggested the officers follow the
stalled by the city this January in rash of tickets started, can't it go ordinances because the first time
the Main St. and S. University away the same way?" he asked. a person gets hit at night they will
Ave. areas. Deputy Police Chief Harold 01- come down on us."

fomenting disorders at the Demo-
cratic convention in 1968. After
demonstrators gathered at the
Federal Courthouse in Seattle to
protest the contempt sentences
given to the Chicago defendants
and their lawyers by Federal
Judge Julius Hoffman, the present
case developed.
At the demonstration-one of a
series of a national protests known
as T.D.A. for The Day After-part
of the crowd surged toward the
courthouse and smashed windows
and threw paint until policemen
moved in.
The defendants, members of the
Seattle Liberation Front, a group
devoted to building an alliance
between students and workers, are
charged with inciting to riot, and
doing so traveling "in interstate
commerce."
Originally scheduled for Seattle,
the trial was moved to Tacoma
While small band of picketers
marched in front of the building,
the trial began. After Judge Ge-
org Boldt entered the courtroom,
one of the defendants, Michael
Abeles, asked that people in the
court "remain standing for a mo-
ment of silence in honor of those
Vietnamese killed by the United
States bombing." The defendants
and their youthful supporters
stood with clenched fists raised.
Selection of a jury continued at
a slow pace yesterday as the de-
fendants pressed for an oppor-
tunity to speak directly to pros-
pective jurors.
The defendants and their law-
yers contend that the prosecution
is part of a program of Govern-
ment repression aimed at stifling
dissent. The prosecution says that
it is a criminal rather than a
political trial.

$100 weekly In the 1957-59
base period.
The rise was a renewed spurt
in the nation's worst inflation in
20 years after having tapered off
slightly the previous three months.
.The Bureau of Labor Statistics
reported also that while it cost
more to live, most workers were
earning less because of reduced
economic activity while inflation
continued eroding every dollar
earned.
The average gross paycheck of
some 45 million rank-and-file
workers dropped 33 cents a week
to $121.03 in October because of
a further cut in the work week.
After taxes and allowances f o r
inflation, the paycheck was worth
61 cents less in purchasing power
over the month and $1.59 less over
the year.
It was the 17th straight month
in which purchasing power was
below year-earlier levels, except
for the single month of November
1969 when it was unchanged.
Thepricerreport said turkeys in
October were up nine per cent to
56 cents a pound or about a nickel
above last year. A spot check in-
dicated turkey prices were at least
as high or higher this month.
October's biggest single price
increase was a 5.4 per cent hike
for new cars. And Labor Depart,
ment analysts blamed the recent-
ly ended General Motors strike in
part for the shortened work week,
lower earnings and the decline in
over-all economic activity.
FEleming gets
ACLU honor
President Robben Fleming will
be guest of honor at the fiftieth
anniversary celebration of the
American Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU) in Detroit Dec. 6.
The dinner, which also com-
memorates the ninth anniversary
of the organization in the state,
will feature former U.S. Atty.
Gen. Ramsey Clark as guest
speaker.
Fleming is being honored for
"his distinguished career in pub-
lic life and his unswerving com-
mitment to the expansion of free-
dom and equality and the defense
of non-violent dissent."
The event will be held in Cobo
Hall, with proceeds to go toward
ACLU's program of defense of
constitutional freedoms.
The ACLU calls itself "the na-
tion's only national non-partisan
non-profit organization devoted
exclusively to matters of consti-
tutional rights and liberties for
all, irrespective of race, religion,
political belief or association."

Jackison
charges
dropped-,
JACKSON, Miss. (A) - The only
person indicted in connection
with violence at Jackson S t a t e
College last May will not be pro-
secuted, Dist. Atty. Jack Travis
said yesterday.
Travis said he would not press
the charges against Ernest L e e
Kyles, 21, a former Job Corps
worker from Bolton who was ac-
cused of inciting to riot and par-
ticipation in a riot.
Kyles was indicted by a Hinds
County grand jury which investi-
gated the incident in which two
young blacks were slain as law
enforcement officers fired in a
girls' dormitory.
The charges grew out of the
burning of a dump truck near the
campus.
The trial of Kyles, a black, had
been postponed while studies were
made of a recent ruling by the Mis-
sippi Supreme Court, in which a
conviction was overturned because
Negroes were systematically ex-
cluded from a trial jury.
At that time, a spokesman for
the district attorney's office said
that time was needed to decide
whether 'Kyles' case should be
submitted to another grand jury.
The spokesman noted that the
method of selecting trial juries had
been changed since the court rul-
ing.
In an earlier development in the
case, a defense motion to quash
Kyles' indictment because of ex-
clusion of Negroes from the trial
jury was overthrown.
On Oct. 1, the President's Com-
mission on Campus Unrest con-
cluded that gun fire by police
against a crowd of Jackson State
College students was an "unrea-
sonable, unjustified overreaction."
In addition to the 2 fatalities,
12 were wounded in the May 12 in-
cident. The commission was un-
able to substantiate the allegation.
by the police that they fired only
in response to sniper fire from a
women's dormitory.
Moreover, the panel said some
city police officers, "established a
pattern of deceit" by denying they
had discharged their weapons.
FBI tests later confirmed the
weapons had been fired, the com-
mission said.
Every officer who admitted fir-
ing testifies he fired into the air
or toward a third and fifth floor
window where snipers allegedly
were hiding.

sen later claimed he had no know- Councilmen Nicholas Kazarinoff
edge of the alleged increase in (D-Third Ward) and James
ticketing. He said, however, that Stevenson (R-F o u r t h Ward)
if there is one, "it is probably due
to the 'new class of recruits' which seemed to express similar senti-
was recently 'put on foot beats'." ments last week when they agreed
One police sergeant added that that policemen should strictly en-
"for about a year, beat men were force the law.
taken off regular beats. These
things are being more consistently Mayor Harris, though, said he
enforced now that policemen are believed the police should be al-
put on foot beats again." lowed discretion when enforcing

~ll

The Michigan Daily,tedited and man-
agtes, by students at the Universitv of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mat'

laws such as giving out bike tick-
ets or in making arrests for al-
leged possession or sale of mari-,
juana.
He claimed that if the policeI
were called to enforce every or-

Summer Session published Tuesday dinance, the whole department
through Saturday morning. Subscrip- could be used up in hunting down
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail, narcotics violations.

'i- Ue

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11

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