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November 24, 1970 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November 24,;1970

PaeSiHEMCHGN AL

Irish

take Cotton bid;

Tigers look to Orange

By The Associated Press

-Associated Press
As I was saying . .
Speaking at a Miami Beach press conference yesterday, Muhammad Ali criticized the New York
area blackout on closed circuit television for his December 7 fight with Argentina's Oscar Bonavena.
Ali's fight is scheduled for New York's Madison Square Garden but the former heavyweight
champ warned that "If they don't open up these theaters, then we might have another announce-
ment."

Notre Dame University, in a
surprising move Sunday, turn-
ed down an invitation to the
Orange Bowl and accepted a
bid to the Cotton Bowl where
they will meet the winner of
the Texas-Arkansas game on
New Year's Day.
The Orange Bowl committee
then extended an invitation to
Louisiana State, a 3-0 loser to
Notre Dame last Saturday, to
play in the N e w Year's Day
classic IF - they win their last
two games against Tulane and
Mississippi. If Louisiana State
should fail to win their last two
contests, the loser of the Tex-
as-Arkansas contest will prob-
ably get the bid.
"It was difficult for our young-
sters to make a decision based
on what might happen," said
Notre Dame's Ara Parseghian,
"but they would like to be play-
ing for the national champion-
ship. That would be ideal."
Coach Charlie McClendon of
LSU told the Orange Bowl com-
mittee: "We want to earn our
way into your bowl. After that
game with Notre Dame, I don't
think we would disappoint any
bowl."
Fourth-ranked Ohio State got
its 20-9 long-awaited revenge
over No. 5 Michigan, finishing
the regular season as unbeaten
Big Ten champs and earning a
trip to the Rose Bowl to play
Stanford. Coach Woody Hayes
called the 1970 Buckeyes "the
greatest team we've ever had
here."
Stanford. ranked 11th, warm-
ed up for the Rose Bowl by los-
ing to California 22-14, the In-
ALL CAMPUS LEAGUE
W L
John F. Ivory 29 11
Cachusifucan 29 11
Century Club 23 17
Optimists 22 18
Team Ten 20 20
Chokers 18 22
Weasels 17 23
Dieldrin 15 25
Lost Cause 14 26
Black Ballers 13 27
HIGH GAME
Jim Miller (Cachusifucan)-215
HIGH SERIES
Jim Miller (Cachusifucan)-607

dians' second straight defeat, as
Cal's Dave Penhall outshone
Jim Plunkett.
Tennessee, rated eighth, blast-
ed Kentucky 45-0 and nailed
down a Sugar Bowl berth against
10th-ranked A i r Force, which
ran into fired-up intrastate ri-
val Colorado a n d absorbed a
49-19 pounding.
Third-ranked Nebraska, en
route to the Orange Bowl,
squeaked past Oklahoma 28-21
for a 10-0-1 mark and the Big
Eight crown. T h e Sooners
headed for the Astro-Bluebon-
net Bowl against idle Alabama.
Arkansas, No. 6, turned back
Texas Tech 24-10, sending the
9th-ranked losers into the Sun
B o w 1 against No. 17 Georgia
Tech, which had the weekend
off.
Two other idle teams - Nos.
12 Mississippi and 13 Auburn -

National Collegiate

were picked for the Gator Bowl,
setting up an Archie Manning-
Pat Sullivan quarterback duel.
The Peach Bowl has invited
Georgia to be the host team ...
if the Bulldogs b e a t Georgia
Tech. If t h e y lose, it will be
North Carolina, w i t h possibly
Colorado or Arizona State as
the visiting team.
That would leave o n 1 y the
Liberty Bowl open, but w i t h
plenty of teams from which to
choose,
Central Missouri State has ac-
cepted an invitation to play in
the Pecan Bowl at Arlington,
Texas, tentatively scheduled to
face defending Pecan Bowl
champ Arkansas State. The
Southland Conference champs
for the third straight year have
yet to accept the invitation,
however.

Standings

BIG EIGHT
70 0

Nebraska

Kansas Si
Oklahoma
Colorado
Missouri
Oklahoma
Kansas
Iowa Sta
Toledo
Miami, 0
Ohio
W. Michi
Bowling
Kent
Stanford
Caifornia
Oregon
UCLA
Washingt

tate 5 2 0
A 4 2 0
3 420
a St. 2 4 0
2 5 0
ate 1 6 0
MID-AMERICAN
5 0 0
. 320
[gan 2 3 0
Green 1 4 0
14 0

10
6
6
6
5
4
5
4

Oregon State 3
Southern Calif. 3
Washington St. 0

4 0
4 0
7 0

s
5
1:

SOUTHEASTERN

11
7
4
7
2
3

LSU
Mississippi
Tennessee
Auburn
Alabama
Florida
Georgia
iss. State
Vanderbilt
Kentucky
Arkansas
Texas
Texas Tech
SMU
Rice
TCU
Baylor

4 0 0 7
4 00 7
3 1 0 8
4 2 0 7
3 3 0 6
3 30 7
3 3 0 5
2 4 0 5
1 4 0 4
0 70 2

0
x
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
a
0
Q
Q
0
1
Q

Texas A& M 0 6 0

MAJOR INDEPENDENTS
Notre Dame 9
Air Force 9
VilLanova 8
Boston College7
Georgia Tech 7
Cincinnati 7
Penn State 7
Tulane 7
Florida State 7
West Texas State 7
West Virginia 7
Houston Univ. 6
Syracuse 6
Dayton 5
Rutgers 5
Pittsburgh 5
Colgate 5
Virginia Tech 5
New Mexico St. 4
Utah State 4
South Mississippi 4

2 8 0

Dartmouth snares Lambert;"
Robinson leads Hickox tally
By The Associated Press
" NEW YORK - Dartmouth College, which concluded a per-
fect 9-0 football season by beating Penn 28-0 last weekend, was named
yesterday as the unanimous winner of the 1970 Lambert Trophy,
awarded annually for outstanding performance by a major Eastern
team. Dartmouth will receive the trophy Dec. 11 at the annual awards
luncheon.
The Big Green received all eight first-place votes and a perfect
score of 80 points in the voting, ending a three-year domination of the
Lambert Trophy by Penn State.
The Nittany Lions, 7-3, finished second with 72 points.
* * *
" NEW YORK - Brooks Robinson's sensational play in the
World Series earned the Baltimore Orioles' third baseman the Octo-
ber prize by an overwhelming margin in the Hickok Pro Athlete of the
Year poll. In voting, announced yesterday, Robinson scored 399
points and received 126 first place.votes to even overshadow Muham-
mad Ali's knockout performance over Jerry Quarry. Ali, in action
for the first time in 31/ years, received eight first place votes and
139 points.
* * *
* NEW YORK - American Basketball Association club owners
called the break off of merger talks by the National Basketball As-
sociation "ill-advised and- unnecessary" yesterday and blamed it on
"a breakdown of communications."
The owners' comments were in reply to a statement by NBA
Commissioner Walter Kennedy last Friday which said the NBA was
discontinuing efforts to take a merger plan to Congress for approval.
* * *
" CHICAGO - Left-handed quarterback Bobby Douglass, who
threw four touchdown passes in Chicago's 31-13 victory over Buffalo
Sunday, is out for the season with a broken left wrist.
* * *
" WILLIAMSBURG - Sophomore Steve Prefontaine, the highest
returning finisher from last year, won the individual title yesterday
and apparently led Oregon to the team crown in the NCAA cross
country championship.

on this and that
Columbus papers,
pleasecopy
eric siegel
STOP.
Before you start reading this column, let's get one thing
straight. Ohio State beat Michigan Saturday fair and square.
The Wolverines had a couple of bad breaks and made some
costly mistakes, but, in the end, they were simply outplayed by
the Buckeyes, no strings attached.
There was nothing fancy or frilly about the way the
Bucks won the game, either. Indeed, as Woody Hayes said
after the game, the key second-half play for the Bucks was
an off-tackle play used to spring Leo Hayden that they
borrowed from a Michigan film. They won the game with
the hard, straight-nosed football that has been the Ohio
State trademark-a good, stiff defense and a grind-'em-up
offense.
Okay?
I don't know about its culture or its politics or even its
night clubs, but when it comes to its football team, Columbus
is strictly a bush town.
Ohio State fans obviously take great pride in the part
they play in the Bucks' famed home-town advantage, but
they have nothing to be proud of. They have a good reason
to come out and support their team, especially in the last
three years, and they have, pacing the NCAA in attendance.
The only trouble is, Buckeye fans go way overboard in
their zealousness.
Two years ago, when the Bucks' super-sophs of '68 were
rolling towards the Rose Bowl and sitting on top of both wire
service polls, a student got killed in one of their wild post-game
celebrations.
When they beat Purdue to open the Big Ten season that
year, their fans showed their support by going on a rampage
through downtown Columbus. When they beat Michigan to
win the conference title, the fans overturned cars with
Michigan license plates, roughed up some Wolverine fans,
and then cut loose on their own city.
Early Saturday morning-less than 12 hours before game
time-a student was shot in a pre-game celebration. Friday
night, a girl was run over on High Street when a horn-honking
Chevy tried to get through a drunken, shouting street crowd.
The Columbus police, who are proud to be numbered
among the Buckeye fans, had a grand time Thursday and
Friday night, blocking off streets so the Buckeye supporters
could march on City Hall, and blasting their sirens every
time somone yelled GO BUCKS. At one point, they even
allowed a staggering student to direct traffic on High Street
with beer cans in each hand.
All this sounds pretty cool until you stop and remember
that six months ago students were gassed and beaten for taking
to the streets to protest the U.S. involvement in Southeast Asia.
These actions might be dismissed as those of a few tiltra-
fanatics, except for what happened at the stadium before and
during the game. It was great to hear the resounding cheers
for Rex Kern, Jack Tatum, Jim Stillwagon, et al, who have
given their best for OSU for three years.
Less sportsmanlike was the constant and merciless
booing of anyone in Michigan colors, and the abuse heaped
on the Michigan players as they made their way back to the
locker room.
The Buckeye fans show a degree of class that is far beneath
that of their football team, but the fans are not the only bush
thing in town. The people in the Ohio Stadium press box had
never seated a woman before Saturday, and they couldn't treat
the presence of Daily Executive Sports Editor Pat Atkins grac-
onsly. While this reporter and several others from Detroit and
Chicago paper wandered about at will, Atkins was told on at
least three occasions to take her seat so as to avoid confusion.
Kaye Kessler, writing in the morning paper Saturday be-
fore the game, saw it, not as a football game, but as a life and
death struggle between twe groups of men.
Before I went to'Columbus and saw people marching,
not for peace or equality but for football; before I saw a girl
get run over and heard about a guy getting shot; before I
saw a whole town and then a whole state completely caught
up in what is still basically a game between two groups of
college men, I would have thought Kessler was just searching
for a clever angle.
Now, I realize that what he said was true, at least in Colum-
bus. Somehow, if I had my choice, I would rather be in Ann
Arbor, where football means just something, not everything,
and where there is still some sense of perspective, even if the
home-town advantage doesn't mean quite as much.

4

*e

4

it

ton

PACIFIC-8
61
4 3
4 3
4 3
4 3

0
0
0
0
0

S
6
6
6
6

SOUTHWEST
5 0 0
t 52 0
2 4 0
2 4 0
1 5 0

9
8
8
5
4
3
2

0

4'

Fiat ma

esIt young

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The popular, packable
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saddle leather with
glove lining. "

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