100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 22, 1970 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-22
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

II V 4' 4

-u

Page Ten

THE DAILY MAGAZINE

Sunday, November 22, 1970

Sunday, November 22, 1970

THE -MICHIGAN DAILY

I .1

I

and shortly die there"

oliday time is
visiting time
i d
r '-
Holidays ahead, and you'll
want your family's clothes fresh,
clean ready for the fun and fes-

With, short har .. .
Continued from Page 10
and told me not to even bother getting a haircut - I was persona non
grata.
I was ready to head back up the Spanish coast when another reject
mentioned to me that he was planning to take-a ferry that night to Ceuta,
Spanish Morocco. Ceuta, being Spanish, has no regulations about hair.
Folks rumored that one might be able to cross the border there into
Morocco without seeing a barber. The rumor must have gotten around,
for when the ferry left for Ceuta that night, there were several hundred
passengers aboard. By quick count, about half of them boys with long hair.
Will hie make it?
When I arrived at the bus station in Ceuta ready for a trip to the
border, I found myself with about 25 long-hairs of various nationalities.
Several had already tried to cross the border and had been greeted by a
number of guards brandishing scissors. A Moroccan was offering this
motley crew his services in sneaking them across the border, for a small
gratuity - about $7.50 each. While the group was discussing the pros and
cons of the proposed venture, including the possibility of being caught
and tossed in jail for seven years, two English fellows and I decided to
take our chances with the border guards. My hair, for instance, was not
as long as some and I had hope of getting past in the dark of night. The
enterprising Moroccan came with us, apparently sensing a deal and some
dough in the making, and we all grabbed a bus to the border.
On the bus we were approached by a wild-haired, French-speaking
Canadian wearing a flaming red ski sweater and a string of tiger tooth
beads, who assured us we'd never make it across the border legally without
losing our hair. He then offered to sneak us across a pass in the Atlas
Mountains, several thousand feet high, and into Morocco for free. To
my amazement the two English fellows agreed to go with him and began
to get off the bus, until the Moroccan stopped them at the door and
explained that the Canadian was half mad and a thief. After leading his
prey up the mountains, the Moroccan claimed, the Canadian attacks and
robs them. It is sometimes difficult to know whom to believe; the
Canadian had already warned us about the unsavory character of the
Moroccan. It seemed best at the time to simply try to cross the border
in the conventional manner.
A half hour later I had made it across the border - hair intact and
passport stamped. My two friends hadn't been so fortunate and were
forced to barber each other under the watchful eye of one of the guards.
With my hair brushed back to look short in front and window bars obscur-
ing the view of the guard, I had only one moment of crisis: when the
guard discovered the invalidated stamp on my passport, he glared at me
suspiciously, asked "Pourquoi, monsieur?" I told him the first thing that
came into my mind: that I had asked to have the stamp invalidated, since
I had decided to enter Spanish Morocco first. The guard looked puzzled,
stared at me some more, and then waved me through. When he finally
saw the back of my head where my hair is quite long, he called at me in
French; I shrugged my shoulders and pointed out that I was standing

In the meantime Nancy had
gotten sick from the e a r 1y
stages of heroin withdawal.
She threw up twice, in the
bathroom. She was trembling
from the nausea and her ear-
lier friendliness turned into
exasperation.
"Hey, you gotta give me the
money now. I'm too bogue,
man, to screw you now," she
said. "You talk too damn
much. Give me the money,
huh?"
I gave her $10 and she left.
The next day was a crisp,
sunny Wednesday. Darryl
woke Richmond and' me with
his pounding on the door and
yelling. He told us a kid that
he called "Spade Dave'" h a d
stolen his driver's license, and
that he wanted us to help get
revenge.
Darryl was shrewd. I had
persuaded him that we could
Nancy got sick
from early stages
of heroin with-
d rawal1. She threw
up twice..
make a whole lot more money
if I stayed off heroin. But he
wanted some insurance. I'd be
a soul brother if I helped beat
up someone who had done him
wrong - and I'd be on his side
of the law.
Darryl showed us b r a s s

knuckles and his knife slipped
inside heavy combat boots.
"I'm going to cut that little
nigger into pieces," he said.
"There won't be enough left
to stick a needle into."
We trailed along to Spade
Dave's apartment where Dar-
ryl kicked open the door and
sent Spade Dave's girlfriend
sprawling.
"He ain't here," she saidI
fearfully. Sherwasa beautiful
girl, a prostitute who made
$300 or more a week for Dave,
who also pimped for his sister
and his wife. "He's in jail,"
she finally said as Darryl
threw a Scotch bottle against
the wall. "The pigs got him
last night."
We tramped back down the
stairs and Darryl found a pay
phone to call the W a y n e
County jail. Spade Dave was
there, picked up on suspicion
of breaking and entering, a
ruse used commonly by t h e
police to hassle junkies. We
figured the cops would h o 1 d
him for 24 hours, but we were
wrong.
We spent the afternoon in
a bar, waiting for Frank and
listening to Darryl complain
because the television set was
gone. "Hey, I just remember-
ed," he laughed suddenly.
"This is the bar that I ripped
off last week. Hey, I took the
goddamn TV a whole god-
damn week ago and they ain't
got a new one yet. Those cheap
bastards."
Frank didn't show. We
found out later the FBI had
captured $1 million worth of
heroin that afternoon on De-
Continued on Page 16

-M-7 4

fi

COTTAGE 211

10 a.m.-2 a.m.

512 E. WILLIAM ST.
(Fri. & Sat. until 3)

tivities.

Depend

on us to dry

clean like new, finish with
spa rkle.
We Combine Low Prices with
High Quality Workmanship
For the Best Service in Town
LADIES DRESS ...............$1.85 & up
MENS SUITS ..................... $1.80
MENS PANTS.....................$ .90
LADIES SLACKS ...................$ .95
SWEATERS .... ............ $ .85 & up
BLOUSES...................$ .90 & up
SKIRTS ............... ............ $ .90
COME AND COMPARE
AT
A &P I Hr. Cleaners
" No parking problem
Drive thru service.

EXCELLENCE
IN DESIGN
AND QUALITY

Aalto
Aarnio
Albinson
Arioll
Asti
Aulenti
Bauer
Beckman

FARI
'. No matter how far out you live TH
BANK has a branch close by.
I " South University Office
x Medical Center Office
h " East Liberty Office
yt East Li
"Plymouth Rd. Office
North Campus--Plymouth Rd,
h We are very interested in helpi
with their banking needs. Conic
Many people already have.
w.4

4

:?": ...ni.At ,cav..24:is'L£4:...''a ""' '."'..".i '."i:.:. <:., :.2::::;. .:'... . 'ti v:i
Budget
Rent, a Car
:: " :r: t\ 2 .,t :a'~ ,:s jzS;.;y; v:; o>;;

of
Ann

:""+5 ;; .,, : 4-" "': r::;; ':ti .r.:'::.y<> .5:;.?k:Sf.i :4?: :,i4>.: 3
Budget

I-
-J
z
0
O!
0

ArorRent a Car
;"?:-.:a 44?5q, ,l.4 . ... .';:r.4 L: ,: S :.LC Ci . : ...~

ORTHOGONALITY
Orthogonality is dedicated to a con-
tinuing. search for excellence in
product design and quality in the
United States and abroad. Most of
the products in the store have re-
ceived significant international
recognition for design and. manu-
facturing quality. Emphasis is given
to the finest of Bauhaus and sub-
sequent design.
Marimekko Dresses
Fabrics by Knoll, Herman Miller,
Marimekko
Furniture by Artek, Artemide, Kevi,
Knoll, Lattoflex, Miller, Stendig
Accessories-Aremide Lamps,
Braun Appliances, Brio Toys,
Danese Forms, Gabbianelli
Ceramics, littala Glass, Luxo
Lamps, Nlederer Glass,
Solari Digital Clocks
ORTHOGONALITY
340 Maynard Street Ann Arbor

Bertoia
Bettonica
Breuer
Cadovius
Colombo
Dukes
Eames
Eichenberger
Eskolin
Girard
Happalainen
Haussmann
Hoffman
Isola
Jacobson
Knoll
Magistretti
Mangiarotti
Mari
Mathsson
Mazza
Mies van der Rohe
Munari
Niederer
Noguchi
Petit
Piha
Plainer
Ouof lander
Raimondi
Ratia
Rinta
Riva
Saarinen
Scarp:
Schweinberger
Schultz
Stephens
Takahama
Tapiovaara
Thompson
Thut
Valle
Vigneili
Wirkkala
Zanuso

" Save-Cash

'N Carry

" For your convenience
one hour service every
day including Saturdays.
CALL 668-9500
312 E. HURON 0 across from city hall
OPEN: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 7 a.m.-5 p.m.

RENT A CAR THIS WEEKEND!
AT THESE MUCH LOWER RATES:
$8.00 per day
8c per mile
New Chevrolets, Pontiacs,
Impalas, Cameros, LeMans

li

202 S. DIVISIONPhn-7135

Phone -761-3255

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan