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November 22, 1970 - Image 16

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-22
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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4 4 a 4q~ 4 I

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Page Eight

THE DAILY MAGAZINE

Supnday, November 22, 1970

Sunday, November 22, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

Who cares what the Times
thinks about a movie now?

Continued from Page 7
was young, bright, intense, a sharp, lucid
writer - everything a paper would desire in
a film critic, except for the fact that she had
almost no experience reviewing films. The
Times was willing to overlook that. After
Iall, Crowther had 30 years' experience and
where didthat get him when Bonnie and
Clyde came along?
But there was more. "There was at the
time Renata was hired a desire to be kind
of 'with it,' but nobody knew what being
'with it' in films meant," recalls Canby.
"For as many years as the Times has been
in existence critics were just created with-
in the Times. Beginning with Clifton Dan-
iel the paper started to upgrade critics in
all fields. In earlier years you can bet that
all of these jobs would have been filled by
city side reporters who won them as sine-
cures of one sort or another."
Adler's specialty was n e w burgeoning
culture (What's newer or more pop than
movies?) and in some ways she was a quite
unexpected example of the 'new,' knocking
down the shibboleths with impatient naiv-
iete. Canby said he disagreed with her "90
per cent of the time, but she brought a lev-
el of intelligence to bear on films the likes
of which no newspaper in this city has ever
had. She would write a review that absolute-
ly refused to tell you to rush out or to stay
home."
Greenspun is more effusive. "She was,
I think, the best thing that ever happened
to the Times because she broke the back of
the whole Bosley Crowther thing. She wrote
sort of wild prose which they labored over,
I know. That's good. To force them to deal
with prose that is not by their standards ef-
ficient, is a very useful thing. What she did
more than anything else was to move the
movie department of the Times into the last
half of the twentieth century, which it had
certainly never been in before.

"Also, she had a sort of blithe disregard
for a number of sacred cows," says Green-
spun. "I don't fully approve of this; she
really knew too little. They had no right
hiring someone like Renata Adler for that
job, and, I suppose you could say she had no
right accepting. By no means a typical, stu-
pid Times' move. To take someone who has
written elsewhere and doesn't know any-
thing about movies or has any particular
competence in film, and put her' into the
top slot of the movie department, is a very
special kind of insanity. That it worked as
well as it did was sort of pure luck."
Nor was the film industry especially en-
chanted by this intellectual pixie; their ca-
terwauls echoed throughout New York. She
Continued on Page 20

Frank grosses
$5,000 a week
in heroin sales.
There are 700
other deal ers.

field area, Frank is a chief-
tain.
Frank is also a father who
worries about four children.
His wife is in the Detroit
House of Correction for pass-
ing a bad check.
"Look here," Frank told me.
"I'm getting enough mo n ey
together to buy me a car and
a house in the suburbs. I'm
gonna be all set when the old
lady gets out of jail."
Frank was mad about the
FBI raid of the previous day,
mad because he had to wait an
eternal 10 hours to get his ownI

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us. Dave told him. We stayed "do," mad because it was cost-
quiet. ing him money and mad be-
"Hey, I've got enough trou- cause it was going to cost him
bles already. If you got the, so much time he had to post-'
balls to do something to these pone his daughter's 13th
cats, you go ahead but you get birthday party.
outta here. I ain't your mom- His children go to s c h o 0 1
ma," Frank said. nearby and are usually smart-
We left. "If I ever catch you ly dressed, classier than their
cats trying to burn me again, classmates whose parents
I ain't even gonna bother see- work in the factories or rely
ing Frank," said Davis. "I'll on welfare. They know their
just shoot you bastards in the father deals heroin and they
back," he said, reaching into I are proud that he's the king
his pocket and pulling out the of the neighborhood.
knife. "Hell, you ain't even got Frank asked me if I had
a piece, you nigger shit," Dar- time that weekend to take his
ryl answered, y t kidsrollerskating, an offer
On Thursday afternoon which put his stamp of ap-
Darryl, Richmond and I met proval on me.
Frank in the Canfield bar. In "Won't us going into busi-
the heirarchy of the c r i m e ness hurt you?" I asked, a
syndicate that smuggles the courtesy question because I
heroin from France and Tur- already knew the answer.
key to the United States, Frank explained that he was
Frank is close to the bottom expanding his business to ac-
of the pyramid. He grosses $5,- comodate the influx of subur-
000 a week in heroin sales in ban kids. But he didn't want
a multi-billion dollar indus- to sell directly to the subur-
try. Police figure there are 150 banites because he said the
more dealers in Detroit j u s t police had warned h i m:
like Frank and about 50 more ' "You'll stay cool as long as we
that are bigger, and about 500 don't catch these young white
more that are smaller. chicks going into your place.
But in the Trumbull-Can- Continued on Page 18
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