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November 22, 1970 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-22

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A'

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 22, 1970

Fourth

period

boots

save

Irish,

Wildcats

0

Notre Dame slips by LSU, 3-0;
California upsets Stanford

Field goal in waning moments
smothers sputtering Spartans

r4

By The Associated Press
SOUTH BEND - Second-rank-
ed Notre Dame sneaked past sev-
enth-ranked Louisiana State 3-0
yesterday on a 24-yard field goal
by Scott Hempel with 2:54 left in
the game.
The Irish, unable to move the
ball against the inspired Tigers
most of the afternoon, drove for
the winning score from the LSU
36-yard line.
Both teams had other oppor-
tunities to score in the b r u t a l
defensive contest. Louisiana State
was short on one field goal at-
teinpt and had a second blocked
while Notre Dame fumbled early
in the first half on the LSU
three-yard line.
The victory was Notre Dame's
ninth of the season against no de-
feats. LSU was left with a 7-2
record.
LSU held the Irish to 29 yards
on the ground in the first half,
and held them to a total of one
yard on offense in the third per-
iod.
Plunkett plunked
.BERKELEY - California quar-
terback Dave Penhall, outper-
forming Stanford's Jim Plunkett,
ran one yard for the winning
touchdown in the last half yester-

day and the Bears upset the Rose
Bowl-bound Indians 22-14.
The Cal senior also threw a
10-yard touchdown pass to Bob
Darby in the first half as fhe
Bears took a 13-0 lead over the
11th-ranked Indians. Penhall
completed 18 of 26 passes for 231
yards.
The defeat was the first of the
year for Stanford in Pacific-8 Con-
ference play. The Indians w ill
take an 8-3 'record into the Rose
Bowl.
* * * .
Huskers triumph
LINCOLN, Neb. - A fourth
quarter touchdown set up by Dan
Schneiss' fingertip catch of a 24-
yard Jerry Tagge pass put Nebras-
ka in command over an inspired
Oklahoma football team yesterday
and the undefeated Cornhuskers
wrapped up an undisputed Big
Eight football championship, 28-
21.
Schneiss' pass catch on a third
down and 11 put Nebraska on
Michigan's soccer team will
take on the Bavarian Sports
Club today in the first round of
the Toledo League Play-offs.
The match will be played in
Toledo.

the Oklahoma one and Tagge
plunged for the score to break a
21-21 tie and clinch Coach Bob De-
vaney's sixth league title in nine
Nebraska years.
* * *
Red Raiders razed
LUBBOCK, Tex. - Quarterback
Bill Montgomery led sixth-ranked
Arkansas on three long touchdown
drives yesterday and the Razor-
backs overpowered Sun Bowl-
bound Texas Tech 24-10 in a
Southwest Conference football
game.
* * *
V ols vault
KNOXVILLE - Eighth-ranked
Tennessee overwhelmed K e n -
tucky 45-0 yesterday and assured
itself of an invitation, to meet Air
Force in New Orleans' S u g a r
Bowl.
After a scoreless first quarter,
Tennessee got its offense rolling
and scored two touchdowns in the
second period, two touchdowns
and a field goal in the third and
two more TD's in the fourth.
* * *
Cadets crushed
AIR FORCE ACADEMY Colo-
Colorado shook off earlier disap-
pointments to play its best football
in the season yesterday in van-
quishing tenth-ranked Air ForceI
49-19.
This was the second defeat for
Air Force after nine victories
while Colorado wound up with a:
6-4 record.
* * *
Harvard fights fiercely
CAMBRIDGE--Sophomore Eric
Crone passed for one touchdown
and scored once himself in the
first half and Harvard held on for
a 14-12 Ivy League football upset
over Yale yesterday in a final
salute to retiring coach John
Yovicsin.

By The Associated Press
EAST LANSING, Mich.-North-
western scored a 27-yard field goal'
with 48 seconds left in the game
to finally overcome s t u b b o r n
Michigan State by a 23-20 score
yesterday and tie for second place
in the Big Ten football standings.
The field goal broke up a 20-20
clifhanger. Hero for the Wildcats
was kicker Bill Planisek.
Earlier, Northwestern was lead-
ing 17-0 in the first half but had
to struggle all the way for the last
minute comeback.
The Wildcat win broke up a
jinx MSU has held since 1924-
an 11-game win streak.
It was the highest Northwestern
has ended in the conference stand-
ings since 1948 when it finished
alone as runnerup to Michigan
and received a Rose Bowl bid.
Michigan State was still trying
in the last seconds of the game
but four incomplete passes by
quarterback Mike Rasmussen kill-
ed the last Spartan hopes.
MSU wound up the season 4-6
won-lost overall, the same as last
year.
* * *
Hazvkey~es nip Illini

te game to preserve a 22-16 BigI
Ten college football victory in theI
last game of the season for both
clubs here yesterday.
Iowa quarterback Roy Bash ran
for two touchdowns and passed
for eight more points to lead the
Hawkeyes to their third victory
against seven defeats. Illinois also
closed its season with a 3-7 mark.
Bash scored on one-yard runs
in the first and fourth quarter
and passed to split end Kerry
Reardon for a five-yard touch-
down and a two-point conversion
Illinois threatened to pull out
a victory in the final 53 seconds
after Bob Bucklin recovered an
Iowa fumble at the Hawkeye 37.
Quarterback Mike Wellis hit a
key pass, then an Iowa pass inter-
ference penalty put the ball st
the Hawkeye one-yard-line with
five second remaining. Wellis tried
to sneak over right tackle for what
would have been the winning
touchdown, but was stopped on
the one-foot-line as the gun
sounded.
* * *
Badgers eat Gophers
MADISON, Wis. -- Wisconsin
quarterback Neil Graff passed for
two touchdowns and ran for an-
other as the Badgers walloped
Minnesota 31-14 yesterday and put
the wraps on their best football
season since 1963.
The Badgers, playing their most
inspired ball of the campaign,
spotted Minnesota first quarter
touchdown, then roared back for
the victory.

Graff, a junior from Sioux
Falls, S.D., set a total Wisconsin
offense mark in guiding the Bad-
gers to their third Big Ten victory
against four conference defeats.
Halfback Rufus "Roadrunner"
Ferguson bolted 29 yards for a
scoring strike in the fourth quar-
ter to ice the contest. Terry Whit-
taker caught a 47-yard touchdown
pass from John Krugman and
Lance Moon crashed over from one
yard out for the final Badger tally.
* * *
Boilermakers breeze
LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Purdue's
Stan Brown demoralized Indiana
with a 100-yard kickoff return and
the Boilermakers battered the
Hoosier football team yesterday,
40-0.
The sleek senior rounded out his
collegiate career game with two
more touchdowns on short runs.
Purdue escaped from a last place
tie in the final Big Ten standings
knd left Indiana tied for the
cellar with a 1-6 record to Pur-
due's 2-5 record.
Purdue already had Indiana
down 13-0 when Brown, a return
specialist, took the third-quarter
kickoff on his goal line, broke a
tackle at his 40-yard line and
raced to the opposite end zone.
Otis Armstrong, busy a half-
back as Purdue ever had, broke
the Purdue one-season record for
total carries and total yards rush-
ing.
Armstrong made one touchdown
and Scott Clayton ran for two as
the Hoosier defense fell apart.

AI

-Associated Press
OTIS ARMSTRONG of Purdue eludes Indiana's Jerry Johnson
in yesterday's 40-0 Boilermaker victory. Armstrong rambled for
213 yards to break Leroy Keyes' Purdue season rushing record
by seven yards. He finished the year with 1010 yards.

IOWA CITY,
stopped Illinois
one-foot-line on

Iowa - Iowa
at the Hawkeye
the last play of

ROSES FOR WOODY
Bowl committees extend bids

Money: The Story of Higher Education

University Activities Center
& Students International
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS
186.00

Not long ago it was no big problem for a college to raise money.
The president simply went out and put the mooch on some fat alumnus.
But that won't work today. Most alunini, shaky about what's hap-
pening on American campuses, are sewing up their pockets. And even
those/few who can still be snowed are driving hard bargains. Not long
ago, for instance, Walter "Boola" McMeekin, Yale '07, got a new
gymnasium named after him and all he gave was three dollars and
forty cents.
Well sir, what's a college to do? If they try to raise tuition just
once more, the remaining buildings will surely be levelled. By the
parents, I mean. Nor can colleges cut operating costs any further be-
cause they long ago eliminated all the frills like, for example, heating
the dormitories. So where will they find the money they so desperately
need?
Well sir, if yours happens to be a college where beer is sold in the
student union, you've got it licked. All you have to do is put in a
plentiful supply of Miller High Life and stand back. You'll see business
boom beyond your most hopeful dreams because every undergrad in
the country is positively bananas about Miller High Life! And why
wouldn't he be? Is any other beer so tasty? So zesty? So trusty? So
gutsy? So feisty? So feasty? So yeasty? So maltsy? So hopsy?
No, dear friends, Miller stands alone, light-years above the others.
And the others will never equal it, for they will never learn Miller's
marvelous brewing formula, a jealously guarded secret for more than
115 years. In fact, the formula today is known to only one man on
earth-Miller's chief brewmaster-who will never, never talk because
he is not only a deaf-mute, he is also a Transylvanian who, as you
know, can turn into a bat if he is ever captured.

ROUND TRIP JET-
AC-044
Dec. 27-Jan. 1 .....
AC-045
Jan. 1-Jan. 7 .......
OV-078
Feb. 26-Mar. 5 .. .

186.00
196.00
189.00

By The Associated Press
Ohio State officially was voteds
into the Rose Bowl last night fol-
lowing the Buckeyes' 20-9 victory
over Michigan for the Big Ten
football title.
John Dewey, assistant to Com-
missioner Bill Reed, made the an-
nouncement after receiving a ma-
jority of votes by conference ath-
letic directors.
"A majority of votes is in and
Ohio State has been selected and
has accepted the bowl bid," said
Dewey. "So far all the votes have
been for Ohio State."
For the student body:
FLARES
by
SLevi
Farah
' Wright
STads
SSebring
State Street at Liberty

It'll mark Ohio State's sixth
visit to the Rose Bowl where this
year the Buckeyes will take on
Stanford and passing ace J im
Plunkett.
Ohio State lost to California 28-
0 in the 1921 Rose Bowl but since
the Big Ten and the West Coast
conference formed a contract in
1947 the Buckeyes have been vic-
torious in their four appearances.
Meanwhile, in Miami, the Orange
Bowl selection committee extend-
ed an invitation to unbeaten Notre
Dame to meet Nebraska in the
Jan. 1 postseason football classic.
Notre Dame officials called a
meeting for 11 a.m. today to con-
sider the invitation, Orange Bowl
President W. Keith Phillips said.
"It was the only invitation ex-
tended today," Phillips said. Notre
Dame, now 9-0 for the season and
ranked second nationally, squeez-
ed past Louisiana State 3-0 yes-
terday.
Nebraska, ranked No. 3 accepted
its invitation to the New Year's
night game last week.
In other bowl games news,
Coach Joe Paterno of Penn State
said yesterday after his t e a m

crushed Pitt they had decided
not to accept a Peach Bowl bid if
one was given.
"They didn't think they'd be
interested in the Peach Bowl," said
Paterno. "They would rather not
go at this time."
The Texas Tech Red Raiders,
24-10 losers to Arkansas yester-
day, announced after the g a m e
that they had accepted a bid to
play in the Sun Bowl contest in
El Paso.
Texas Tech's opponent in the
December 19 affair will be the
Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, who
also accepted yesterday while the
Crimson Tide of Alabama accepted
a bid to the Blue Bonnet Bowl.
In the Gator Bowl, both Missippi
and Auburn accepted bids.
Jacksonville State University's
football team has accepted a bid
to play in Florida A&M's 38th an-
nual Orange Blossom Classic Dec.
12, becomingthe first white school
ever to participate in the event.
Jacksonville State, currently 7-0,
will take on A&M's Rattlers in
Miami's Orange Bowl at 8 p.m.

Big Ten Standings

Ohio State
MICHIGAN
Northwestern
Iowa
Michigan State
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Purdue
Illinois
Indiana

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SCORES

Conference Games
W L T PF PA
7 0 0 183 70
6 1 0 237 68
6 1 0 192 93
3 3 1 105 173
3 4 1 146 130
3 4 0 134 144
2 4 1 109 157
2 5 0 120 127
1 6 0 109 240
1 6 0 69 212

W
9
9
6
3
4
4
3
4
3
1

Christmas through EASTER
The FREEPORT INN becomes
a STUDENT RESORT
All Student Guests
2 hour long "Happy Hour"
every evening with
Live Music & Dancing
Unlimited free drinks
" SCUBA LESSONS1
" HORSEBACK RIDING
" HONDA RENTAL
Open only to U. of M. students,
faculty, staff, and immediate
families.
2nd floor, MICH. UNION
UAC Travel
763-2147 or 769-5790

All Games
L TPFPA
0 0 273 93
1 0 288 90
4 0 233 161
6 1 129 262
6 0 190 215
5 1 198 195
6 1 180 220
6 0 161 187
7 0 161 279
9 0 102 300

,__ __

Ig

MONDAY NIGHT SPECIAL
PSYCHEDELIC!I
THREE-COLOR AUDIO LIGHTS
Regularly $34.95
Monday Night Only $1995
All Pre-Recorded 7" Reel Tapes
20% Off
HI-FI BUYS
618 S. Main Phone 769-4700
Ann Arbor-East Lansing
"Quality Sound Through Quality Eciuipment"

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
GRIDDE PICKINGS
Ohio State 20, MICHIGAN 9
Iowa 22, Illinois 16
Northwestern 23, Michigan State 20
Purdue 40, Indiana 0
Wisconsin 39, Minnesota 14
Harvard 14, Yale 12
Syracuse 56, Miami (Fla.) 16
Florida State 33, Kansas State 7
Missouri 28, Kansas 17
Nebraska 28, Oklahoma 21
Notre Dame 3, Louisiana State 0
Southern Methodist 23, Baylor 10
Arkansas 24, Texas Tech 10
Colorado 49, Air Force 14
California 22, Stanford 14
Oregon State 24, Oregon 9
UCLA 45, SouthernrCalifornia 20
Maryland 17, Virginia 14
Penn State 35, Pittsburgh 15
Grambling 37, Southern U. 24
East
Brown 17, Columbia 12
Cornell 6, Princeton 3
Dartmouth 28, Pennsylvania 0
Boston Col. 21, Massachusetts 10
Connecticut 20, Holy Cross 20
South
South Carolina 38, Clemson 32
Tennessee 45, Kentucky 0
Virginia Tech 20, Virginia Military 14
North Carolina 59, Duke 34

Utah State 15, Memphis State 12
Louisville 23, Drake 14
Vanderbilt 36, Tampa 28
Midwest
Oklahoma State 36, Iowa State 27
Cincinnati 33, Miami (O) 0
Kent State 34, Xavier 6
North Texas State 41, Wichita St. 24
West
Utah 14, Brigham Young 13
Washington 45, Washington St. 25
Long Beach St. 27, San Diego St. 11
WCHA
Michigan State 2, Minnesota 1
PRO SPORTS
NHL
New York 5, Montreal 4
Toronto 5, California 3
Boston 5,Philadelphia 2
Pittsburgh 6, Detroit 1
Buffalo at Minnesota, inc.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, inc.
Chicago at St. Louis, inc.
ABA
Kentucky 114, New York 92
Pittsburgh 114, Carolina 100
Virginia' 110, Indiana 103
Floridians 147, Texas 132
NBA
Cincinnati 114, Detroit 102
New York 102, Cleveland 94
Chicago 110, Boston 107
Phoenix 125, Philadelphia 110

I

Forecast: Cold and Snow!,

GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
Monday, Nov. 23
NOON LUNCHEON - 35C
"No Extension of the Draft"

But I digress. Supposing you don't sell beer in the union, where
then can you raise the money? Well sir, here's what they did at the
Idaho State College of Belles Lettres and Spot Welding.
What they did was add a six-dollar cover charge to each meal in
the student cafeteria. Naturally they had to justify the charge, so they
started doing floor shows during meals. Believe me, folks, if you're ever
in the neighborhood, be sure to drop in. It's worth every penny.
The show opens with Professor Norman Glebe, the ever-popular
head of the sociology and weather-stripping department, doing several
chucklesome stunts and imitations. First he sings Trees as it might be
done by Jose Feliciano, Georges Pompidou, and Woody Woodpecker.
Next he sings School Days as it might be done by the Lennon Sisters,
the Mayo Brothers and Mark Rudd. For his last number he does that
old reliable, can't-miss, sure-fire crowd pleaser: he wrestles a naked bison.
A tough act to follow, right? But wait. After him comes Professor
Nirvana Sigafoos, the ever-popular head of the Finnish and other gut-
tural languages department, whose specialty is swallowing. She starts
commonplacely enough by swallowing a sword, and at this point the
(audience always yawns and says, "Ho-hum. Another sword swallower."
But she soon disabuses them of that notion, you may be sure! Next she
swallows two Ph.D. theses and a Buick. But wait. She finishes by in-
gesting the entire buildings and grounds department! Well sir, all I can
say is if Ed Sullivan ever catches this act, there'll be a bright new star
in the Broadway firmament!
After Professor Sigafoos's act the audience is naturally half-dead
from applauding, so the finale is a welcomely quiet act. Three spores

Get ready for the
cold, snowy days
ahead with this
trico lined
Vinyl Boot
with inside zip.
BLACK or BROWN

II -d

I

1

11

SPEAKERS:
Mrs. Sandy Miller, Mrs. Gail Kellum
Michigan Council for Repeal of the Draft
MON. 4 P.M.: SEMINAR ON NON-VIOLENCE

I

'1

"r
, S
$Zri4 anbu'th#a
DfNING ROOM & CARRY OUT
Franchised Nationally
introduces new

I

Free Film Monday, November 23,1970 Free Film
THE HOLY OUTLAW
Father Dan Berrigan
A film about the Jesuit priest and poet who went
underground after conviction for destroying draft
records.
With an interview and other sequences filrred
underground while Father Berrigan was still in hid-
ing from the FBI.
By LEE LOCKWOOD and DON L ENZER

$16.00

Monday-Tuesday
COVrIRIC I

I

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