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November 21, 1970 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-21

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, November 21, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, November21, 1970

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LSU, Irish

battle

fo

By KENNETH COHN
Strangely enough, s o m e foot-
ball fans will not watch or listen
o today's game in Columbus.
Some of them think that other
games are more worthy of their
attention. Admittedly, they may
be justified in this opinion, ig-
norant though they are.
Probably the most important of
hese second-rate games will be
layed in South Bend, where sec-
nd-ranked Notre Dame plays
eventh-ranked Louisiana State.
The Irish, 8-0 so far, are coming
off a close call against Georgia
Tech, while t h e defense-minded
Tigers primed themselves for to-
day's battle with their biggest of-
ensive showing of t h e season,
olling over Mississippi State last
Saturday, 38-7.

No matter how h a r d a top-
ranked team tries, it can't play
them one at a time," and these
two teams are no exceptions. Not-
re Dame will try to forget last
week's game, as it meets LSU to-
day, but its main problem is mak-
ing everyone else forget it.
The poor showing of the Irish
against Georgia Tech, in which a
fourth - quarter touchdown en-
abled them to pull out a 10-7 vic-
tory, dropped them from 1st to
2nd in the polls. Their visitors
after a victory today would un-
doubtedly be Cotton and Orange
Bowl suitors. And yet, the Irish
can't ignore the spectre of arch-
nemesis Southern Cal, who pre-
sents a further threat in the sea-
son finale to Irish hopes for a na-
tional championship.

By all measures of prediction,
today's clash should be a defensive
struggle. Notre Dame, despite its
first-in-the-nation offense, has
allowed only 7.4 points a game
and ranks fifth in the country
in total defense. The Theismann-
Gatewood tandem on offense is
counterbalanced by the Clarence
Ellis-Ralph Stepaniak cornerback
team and by a front line that has
permitted less t h a n a hundred
yards a game on the ground.
Similarly, in a conference which
may have invented the word "de-
fense," LSU consistently led all
others in stinginess. The Tigers
are n o w first in the nation in
rushing defense, allowing a mere
46 ground yards a contest and are
tenth in overall defense.
After managing to lose to Tex-
as A&M in their season opener,
the Bayou Bengals h a v e swept
through their last seven contests,
including among their victims Au-

r bowls.
burn and Alabama. They h a v e
permitted only 7.8 points a game,
and haven't yet given up a touch-
down on the ground.
SENIOR BUDDY LEE and soph
Bert Jones have alternated as the
Tigers' signal-caller; Lee will start
today. Sharing t h e offensive
chores with him will be running
back Art Cantrelle and the team's
t o p receiver, Andy Hamilton.
Leading LSU's impenetrable de-
fense are linemen John Sage and
Ron Estay; backing them up will
be linebacker Louis Cascio and
cornerback Tom Casanova.
T h e third - ranked Nebraska
Cornhuskers, who have beat baclt
all challengers so far, meet their
last one today on the road to the
Big Eight title. T h e Oklahoma
Sooners, led by quarterback Jack
Mildren, have lost only once in
the conference and still have a
chance at a share of the crown.

polls
But Orange Bowl-bound Ne-
braska, with the exception of an
early-season tie, have- not played
a truly close game yet, and the
Husker bulldozer hopes to plow
right through to Miami.
Arkansas will meet Texas Tech
today in what should be the Pork-
ers' final warm-up before the
Armageddon at Austin. The 8-2
Red. Raiders still have an outside
shot for a portion of the South-
west Conference title and a Cot-
ton Bowl trip, but the Razorbacks
smell horsemeat, and are not like-
ly to be put off the scent.
In New England, they speak a
different language from that of
the Midwest - "The Game" to-
day' is not between Michigan and
Ohio State, but between two old
rivals from Cambridge and New
Haven. Harvard has lost twice in
the Ivy League, but Yale holds
faltering h o p e s of tying Dart-
mouth for the championship.

I

COMING UP ROSES?
MSU threatens Wildcats' hopes

By JAMES EPSTEIN
Aside from "the game," there is
one other contest on the Big Ten
schedule today that should prove
interesting, t h e Northwestern-
Michigan State affair. The Wild-
cats, headed for their best finish
since 1948, are trying tosprotect
their chance for a Rose Bowl
berth.
Northwestern goes into today's
game with a 5-1 conference record
and a 5-4 record overall. A win
for the Wildcats today, coupled
with a Michigan victory over Ohio
State, would put them in a tie with
the Buckeyes for second place in
the Big Ten.
The conference athletic direc-
tors would then vote on which
team to send tohPasadena. If this
occurs, and precedent is followed,
Northwesternkcould get the nod
over the Bucks in case of a tie in
the vote since Ohio State was at
the classic more recently.
The Wildcats invade East Lan-
sing at less than full strength.
Starting linebacker Jack Derning,
one of the team leaders in tackles,
has been lost to Northwestern for
the remainder of the season with
a knee injury.
The dynamic backfield duo of

Mike Adamle and Al Robinson,
however, is quite ready to take on
the Spartans. Adamle, one of the
nation's top rushers, has, amassed
a total of 1118 yards on the
ground so far this year. Robinson,
who has been overshadowed by
Adamle this season, has himself
rushed for in over 500 yards.
Junior quarterback M a u r i e
Daigneau, while his completion
ratio is not high (80 of 187) has
picked up 1043 yards through the
air. The favorite target for Daig-
neau has been flanker Barry Pear-
son, who has hauled in 27 passes
for 401 yards and two touchdown.
Daigneau also hits split end Jim
Lash, Adamle and Robinson with
the same degree of consistency.
The most sparking aspect of
the Wildcats' defense is the defen-
sive backfield. The Northwestern
pass defense is currently rated the
second best in the country, allow-

ing just over 30 per cent of enemy
aerials to be completed.
The Wildcats as a team have
picked off 18 passes so far this
year with the team leader, junior
Eric Hutchinson, snatching six.
The starting backfield alone has
pulled in 11 of the errant tosses.
The Spartan team that North-
western will face is no pushover.
Michigan State comes into the
action today with a 3-3 overall
record in conference play and
three wins in its last four outings.
The Spartans sport another of
the best all around running backs
in the conference, Eric Allen. The
flashy Allen has zipped through
the line for 703 yards this season,
averaging 4.5 a try.
The other Big Ten finales sched-
uled for today are Illinois (1-5) at
Iowa (2-3-1), Indiana (1-5) at

A

*1

Purdue (1-5) and Minnesota
3-1) at Wisconsin (2-4)

(2-

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ED GUYLAS (12), Notre Dame
halfback, looks for running room
in an Irish victory over Pitts-
burgh earlier this season. The
undefeated Irish meet once-
beaten Louisiana State today in
a battle of two of the nation's
top ten teams. Both teams are
looking forward to post-season
bowl appearances.

Big Ten Standings

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MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Northwestern
Michigan State
Iowa
Minnesota
Wisconsin
Purdue
Illinois
Indiana

Conference Games
W L T PF PA
6 0 0 228 48
6 0 0 163 61
5 1 0 169 73
3 3 0 126 107
2 3 1 83 157
2 3 1 95 118

W
9
5
4
2
3
3
3
3
1

2
1

TODAY'S GAMES
MICHIGAN at Ohio State
Indiana at Purdue
Illinois at Iowa
Michigan State at Northwestern
Minnesota at Wisconsin

4
5

0 109 130
0 80 127

All Games
L T PF PA
0 0 279 70
0 0 253 84
4 0 210 141
5 0 170 192
6 1 107 246
5 1 166 194
5 1 159 181
6 0 121 187
6 0 145 257
8 0 102 260

1 5 0 93 218
1 5 0 69 172

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