100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 03, 1970 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 3, 1970

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursdar.-_rt..ber.. 1970.

r

Bay takes grip on wrestling team

FALL TERM OF THE
BEE1T MIDRASH
PROGRAM IN JEWISH STUDIES
e THE HASSIDIC VIEW ON THE EXISTENCE AND PURPOSE OF THE UNIVERSE
An introduction to Hassidic philosophy. Discusses the role of the Jew in the world, and his relation to the
ultimate unity of the spiritual and the material in the Ein Sof, the wellspring of all beginning. Text: Col-
lected Sayings (Tanya) of Rabbi Schneur Zalman,
JEWISH MUSIC
A guided tour through the golden treasures of Jewish melody, which arose out of the Jewish experience in
many lands, past and present, East and West. Listening, with commentary by the instructor.
! HEBREW FOR BEGINNERS
Grammar and conversational Hebrew for people with no background in the language. Emphasis on compre-
hension of modern Hebrew, oral expression and composition.
* HEBREW SPEAKING CLUB
Hebrew conversation in an enjoyable, informal setting. All welcome.
* INTERMEDIATE HEBREW
For graduates of Beginners Hebrew. Students with some Hebrew background can determine their appro-
priate level of placement by consultation with the instructor.
* ADVANCED HEBREW
Student uncertain as to the proper level of Hebrew placement should consult with the instructor.

By PAT ATKINS
Executive Sports Editor
The bulletin board at the
entrance to the Hilton Inn's
Ambassador Room in Ann Ar-
bor proclaimed in raised white
letters, "Banquet Room - Test-
imonial Dinner for Cliff Keen."
After the dinner was over, it
was obvious to all in attend-
ance that another line should
have been added, "Now appear-
ing - Rick Bay."
Michigan's new head wrest-
ling coach Rick Bay, officially
appointed this past June, w a s
toastmaster for the affair held
last March. Even those who did
not know his broadcasting back-
ground could tell Bay was at
ease in front of his audience.
With obvious enjoyment Bay
related stories about Keen that
he had heard and experienced
during his association with the
coach.
Michigan wrestling alumni
and their friends and relatives
attending that night had known
really only one Wolverine head
wrestling coach, Cliff K e e n,
Michigan's mentor for 45 years.
By evening's end, they were left
with the impression that Michi-
gan's wrestling program was in
knowledgeable h an d s , despite
Bay's being a 26 year old
'youngster."
Rather than fight the com-
parison to his former coach,
Bay remains flattered by the
relationship. "He is one'of two
men who most greatly influenc-
ed my life. One was m father,
the other Coach Keen," Bay1
says. "He was like a second
father to me. Oddly enough,
both were coaches. My dad was
my high school wrestling a n d
football coach."
Bay continues, "You're always
a product of your environment.
You try to take the best from
each situation that you exper-
ience and each person that you
meet."
Even a casual conversation
with Michigan's new head coach
makes one realize that Bay ap-
plies his o w n instructions to
himself. "If I can just maintain
what Cliff Keen h a s created,
I'll feel successful," Bay ex-
plains.
NEITHER BAY nor K e e n

entered college with the inten-
tion of coaching wrestling as a
career.. Keen began as a law'
student. Bay took a degree in
speech (radio and television)
and English from Michigan with
the aim of a sportscasting ca-
reer.
Right after graduation in
1965, Bay enlisted in the Marine
corps. "I don't know why," Bay
says, "but for some reason I felt
about to be drafted. When I got
out I was looking for a radio
job, but I was married in Febru-
ary and I needed to get a job."
He took one with an .insu.r-
ance- agency, knowing that it
would not be a long term ap-
pointment.
Durilg this time, 'Bay hap-
pened to drive to Iowa State to
watch the 1966 NCAA champ-
ionships. That was the cul-
mination of several coincidences
which led to his assistant
coaching position at Michigan.
Dennis Fitzgerald, who at
that time was aiding Keen in
the wrestling program as well
as helping out on football, want-
ed to go full time into football
coaching.
When Bay visited with Mich-
igan Coach Keen at the tourna-
ment. Keen sounded him on the
possibility of the assistant
coaching position in Ann Arbor.
A blind ad for a radio news-
man that Bay had answered
just before he left turned out to
be for WAAM, also in Ann Ar-
bor. A bargain was struck
whereby Bay could work an
early morning news shift and
coach Michigan wrestling in the
afternoon.
THE NEXT SUMMER, 1967,
Bay enrolled in law school a n d
finished a semester. "The fol-
lowing year I had to withdraw,"
Bay explains, "because of in-
creasing coaching duties. It was
becoming more.apparent that
Cliff was going to retire in a
few years, so the job became
more time consuming for me."
Bay's broadcasting career, in-
cluding color man on 'Larry
Zimmer's football broadcasts
and morning news man, had
been necessarily curtailed also.
This all was quite a switch
from his original plans. "When
I graduated from high school,"

1~

4

oi

Rick Bay

4 BASIC JUDAISM

This course covers the basic trends of Jewish thought and expression, as revealed in three classics of Juda-
ism-the Torah, the Siddur, and the Mishnah-and their application to modern life.
* ANCIENT JEWISH HISTORY
From Abraham through the fall of the Second Temple, with special emphasis on the dynamics of power
exercised by the ruling class.
SHISTORY OF EAST EUROPEAN JEWRY IN THE 20TH CENTURY
Ideological ferment and institutional unpheaval will be the focus of the course with emphasis on religious,
political and cultural movements such as Zionism and Bundism.
THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE
A discussion of the literary forms in Biblical Literature with special emphasis on prose narrative and poetic
structure..
YIDDISH SPEAKING CLUB
The principle language of the Jewish people for 1,000 years, Yiddish is well worth studying. The emphasis is
on modern literary Yiddish and speakers of all levels of proficiency will be accommodated. Beginners wel-
come.
" THE JEW IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
A broad survey of the attitudes and conceptions of Jews and Judaism as found in the writings of Shake-
spegre, Marlowe, Milton, Donne and Blake.
THE KIBBUTZ: COMMUNAL WAY OF LIFE IN MODERN SOCIETY
Kibbutz socialization and the communal way.of life in industridl society. Can America make use of the Kib-
butz idea?
THE ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT: HISTORICAL, SOCIAL AND
PSYCHOLOGICAL ISSUES
An interdisciplinary approach to the Arab-Israeli conflict will be attempted in this course. The course will
focus on the Palestinian problem. Simulat on and other research methods of behavioral sciesces will be
discussed.

3p *' i ,. ...i....Meggg

1

X:g
i:"rFF
.f
"$Y
: k
": 4i:
t.
,n
Y

Lal
Join the 1970
CHA
NO EXPERIENCE NECESS.
FALL AND SPRING SEAS(
SPRING TRIP TO VIRGIN
ORGANIZA
Busin
Wed.,
First I
PRACTICE BEGI
Ferry Fi(
CONTACT COACHES:
BOB KA
SKIP FL
48
MANAGER NEEDED!

Midwest Club Division
MPIONS!
ARY
;NS
IA
ATIONAL MEETING:
ess Administration Buildingj
Sept. 9 7:00 P.M.
Floor Auditorium
NS MONDAY, SEPT. 14
eld 4:30
MAN 662-3313
ANAGAN 663-4205
2-6608 (eves.)

Bay recalls with a grin, "like
every kid, I was certain that I
would play pro baseball a n d
football." From Waukegan,
Illinois, Bay played football,
baseball, and wrestled in high
school. He was all-state quar-
terback, and state _high school
wrestling champ three years.
"I felt I liked football best,
my best sport was wrestling,
and in terms of a career, my
best bet was as a catcher." Bay
remembers of his high school
ambitions. "But my dad kept
after me that not that many
make it into the pros. You work
on those grades, he'd keep say-
ing."
It was partly because of Mich-
igan's balanced athletic a n d
academic program that Bay
came. But Cliff Keen was
another and as compelling a
reason.
"HE JUST didn't have to re-
cruit me," Bay explains. "My
first . great impression came
while he was showing me
around the campus. Over in the
wrestling practice room, then
it was in the IM building, there
were pictures of past champions.
The first in line was Theron
Donohoe up to, well, then it
was Dennis Fitzgerald. I'd been
in other wrestling rooms where
they had the pictures of past
champions, but he could tell me
about what each of those guys
was doing that day.
"I knew right then that any-
one who could formulate that
type of relationship with a
wrestler that could last a life-
time was what I wanted."
While at Michigan, Bay won

two Big Ten championships and
was a member of three, cham-
pion, teams.
Bay, who talks with a color
man's flair, and looks like one's
image of a Marine, loses his
easy going set when he discusses
the philosophy of wrestling.
"What's most gratifying about
coaching is the relationship'you
build. Cliff was aware of this,"
Bay notes.
"Michigan will do a great
deal more for a wrestler than
that wrestler will ever do for
the school. I'm not a high pres-
sure, recruiter. I enjoy taking
young men around Michigan,
showing the academic side and
telling them about the yellow
and blue. I won't downgrade
another school to convince
someone to come here,,and I'm
certainly not going to wine and
dine the recruits," Bay' says.
"KEEN DIDN'T believe in re-
cruiting and neither do I. I hope
to God we can survive with this
philosophy. But we're going to
have to have a little greater
emphasis on recruiting. There's
no way we could compete if we
didn't."
Bay doesn't expect any sweep-
ing changes. "They're big shoes
to fill," Bay adds, "but it's
happened at Michigan before.
Look, Gus Stager took over
from Matt Mann, Don Lund
from Ray Fisher. The school's
rich in personalities. You don't
ever just replace a guy 11 k e
Cliff Keen.
Cgach Bay does have some
distance to go before matching
ten tenure of Cliff Keen. His 45
years won't be-up until 2015.

*

~.i.nKrx f rv.v9.:;. Y ...; . fs A . <i .. .. a .. 4...L

I

W--

*i

REGISTRATION. TUES., WED., THURS,
SEPTEMBER 8, 9, 10

MICHIGAN UNION

ROOMS 3R, 3S

EF
A TEN DOLLAR REGISTRATION, FEE COVERS ALL COURSES

WORKSHOP ON CREATIVE SERVICES

This seminar will be open to not more than 12 persons who seriously want to explore experimental forms
of Worship and Celebration. Its purpose is. to investigate the psychology of Celebration from a Jewish per-
spective and to create, through the medium of poetry, drama, song, dance, and the film, new'and imagina-
tive forms of Jewish worship.
* CONTEMPORARY JEWISH AUTHORS: BELLOW, ROTH, MALAMUD,
WIESEL, AND SINGER
* CONTEMPORARY CRISES IN JEWISH LAW
This course will establish a uniquely Jewish approach to contemporary sociological, political and ecosomical
problems. The medium will be Halasho-normative Jewish law which governs every conceivable area of life,
both private and communal.'

CLASSES BEGIN THE WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 14
Late Registration September 14-18
PRE-REGISTRA TION FORM
CLIP AND SEND!
f 1 AM INTERESTED IN THE FOLLOWING COURSES:
Q The Hassidic View on theExistence and Q The Jew in English Literature
Purpose of the Universe QThe Kibbutz: Communal Way of
Q Jewish Music Life in Modern Society
Q Hebrew for Beginners E] The Arab-Israeli Conflict: Historical,
s Q ] Hebrew Speaking Club Social, and Psychological Issues ru
Intermediate Hebrew -Workshop on Creative Services
C]Advanced Hebrew QHebrew Literature
Q Basic Judaism Q]Contemporary Jewish Authors: Bellow, U
1]Ancient Jewish History Roth, Malamud, Wiesel, and Singer
SEl Historv of East Euronean Jewrv in [- Contemnornrv Crises in Jewish I ow

a

I

i

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan