100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 19, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OPENS TONIGHT!

i

page three

im4c

AW 41P
tr4t n

43, tt. 410
iiy

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Thursday, November 19, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

I

news briefs

By The Associated Press

1

; .
. ,..'
r
*
-
rr
rr
,y .
;}S
?{:",
:?:
fi}' l
i(f
1d's
;'. .
,,.
I
ih
S
O
I
!! F
;"
1
_" y

How will you manage in
1991
The Graduate School of Industrial Admin-
istration at Carnegie-Mellon University of-
fers an innovative, relevant, and future-
oriented program in management for ana-
lytici ly-tra i ned students.
We will be at your Placement Services Office
Monday, November 23

DETROIT'S BOARD OF CANVASSERS in an unprecedent-
ed move has refused to certify the city's Nov. 3 election, con-
ducted on a computer punch-card voting system which failed.
The 3-1 vote against certification could pave the way for an
eventual new election if the Wayne County Board of Canvassers and
the State Board of Canvassers also refuse to certify the Detroit re-
sults.
A DEFENSE WITNESS testified yesterday that Sgt. David
Mitchell never stopped at a My Lai drainage ditch where the
Army says Mitchell shot unarmed civilians.I
The witness claimed he saw a prosecution witness - not Mitch-
ell shoot into the ditch during the second day of testimony in the
trial of 10 soldiers charged with murder of Vietnamese civilians at
My Lai.

-Associated Press

About-face for flag burner

THE U.S. COURT OF APPEALS refused yesterday to return Martha Myers carries a flag on a three-mile trek from
to Seattle the trial of the "Seattle 7," charged with conspiracy a six-month jail sentence she had received for flag bur
in a Seattle demonstration protesting the "Chicago 7" verdict. - - -- ---------------------- -_----
The defendants had protested the moving of the case to Tacoma, CALL 'UNCONSTITUTIONAL'
Wash., claiming that it would deny them jurors from their own com-
munity and would impose a financial burden.

n Arlington, Mass. to Harvard Square to avoid
rning.

SEE US?

BRING QUESTIONS!

* * *
THE UNITED STEELWORKERS unveiled their 1971 con-
tract demands yesterday and President I. W. Abel said the union
would strike if necessary to support the demands, which include
"a very substantial wage hike."
Other issues that the steelworkers will bargain for include im-
Provements in the nensiAn1 rofgrams_ insura nee' and vacations Luar-

Top scientists level attack at

Contemporary Directions 1910-11 !
PRESENTS
The Michigan Contemporar
Directions' Ensemble
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1970, 8:00 P.M.
RACKHAM LECTURE HALLj
DAVID BATES, Conductor
-PROGRAM-
CHARLES IVES........From the Steeples and the
Mountains
JACOB DRUCKMAN ..... Animus I for Trombone
and Electronic Tape
JOHN HAWKINS..............Remembrances
KARLHEINZ STOCKHAUSEN .......... Refrain
-INTERMISSION-
JOHN CAGE.......String Quartet in Four Parts
LEJAREN HILLER ............... An Avalanche
SPECIAL ADDED ATTRACTION: A PLAYER PIANO!
Classic Piano Rolls of Ragtime and Jazz!
Sponsored by: The Composition Department of the
University of Michigan School of Music
-ADMISSION FREE--

bill for defense site

p~ i114- i i;jU~lI l 9 U~l, liu lu,UlV u Ml , g u-
anteed salaries and a reduction in work week. WASHINGTON 0P) - A bill member nonpartisan Federation of'
d * rwhich backers claim is needed to American Scientists sent letters
keep subversives away from clas- urging senators to kill the measure
WEST GERMANY, in a major step toward better relations sified. .o and sensitive which the House passed by 274 to
with Eastern Europe, agreed yesterday to a treaty with Poland, s adfen and s t-: 65 earlier this year.
aimed at easing 21 years of enmity. Jtaceat defense faciliti sth The scientists see the proposal
Bonn and Warsaw have had no diplomatic contact for two de- termed it "not only unnecessary as a threat to laboratory work.
cades. The treaty is expected to raise to consular level the Polish but unconstitutional." The measure would apply to cam-
trade mission in Cologne and the West German trade mission in More than 800 U.S. scientist pus research on classified military
Warsaw. signed petitions, and the 1,500-
___ ________-- Supporters of the legislation de-

MARINE GENERAL- SPEAKS
-U.S. was 'over optimistic' on war

WASHINGTON (P) - Calling
himself naive, Marine Corps
Gen. Lewis Walt said yesterday
he and other American leaders
were overly optimistic in the
early days of the Vietnam war
because "we didn't appreciate
the importance of the guerrilla."
"This was a brand new war
and we didn't' recognize it,"
said Walt, who led U.S. Marines
in Vietnam for more than two
years. Now assistant comman-
dant, he will retire from the
Corps in February.
Those who wereroverly op-
timistic, he said, were thinking
of World War II and Korea-type
conflicts and didn't understand
"you just can't go in and wipe
out" guerrillas.
"When I got out there I

didn't understand this war,"
Walt told newsmen at a Penta-
gon briefing. He said he found
in a recent visit that the Viet
Cong guerrilla threat now is
"pretty well in hand."
The four-star general said
that when he first arrived in
Vietnam in 1965 it took him six
months to find out what the war
was all about, and that he had
to get out into the villages and
hamlets to learn for himself.
To illustrate "how naive I
was," Walt told of spending an
hour talking with a village of-
ficial and ending up feeling good
about the situation.
However, the Marine general
said, he soon felt a woman tug-
ging at him as she put a paper
in his hand. The paper told him

that the village official who had
given him such a cheering report
actually was the No. 1 Viet Cong
in the settlement.
"It took a while to catch on,
to learn how to fight that war,"
Walt said, adding that the Mar-
ines eventually found out they
had to win the people over.
Looking back, Walt indicated
he feels the war could have been
shortened if the American peo-
ple could have been made to
understand better and if U.S.
military men had been allowed
tc shut off the port of Hai-
phong as an inlet of Communist
supplies to North Vietnam.
"We in the military didn't
define the war in the terms we
should have," he said.

scribe it as necessary to maintain
basic national security programs,
including protecting essential in-
dustrial facilities and production,
and to safeguard classified data
released to contractors.
But petition signers, including
six winners of the Nobel Prize-
Hans Bethe, Arthur Kornberg,
Salvador Luria, Linus Pauling, Al-
bert Szent-Gyorgyl and George
Wald-said the legislation en-
dangers academic freedom and
"would overturn eight decisions'
of the Supreme Court that protect
the right of the individual free-
dom of employment."
Representatives of the scien-
tists presented the petition and a'
sack packed with signature cards
to Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-
Mass).
sHetold them he thinks it is
highly unlikely that Committee
action will be taken on the bill
before the post-election session
ends. He said he will work for de-
feat of the measure.
"It gives the President and the

security
secretary of defense the power to
designate virtually any institution
a 'defense facility' and then to in-
vestigate any person who has any
connection with that institution.
The national security does not re-
quire such overboard measures,"
he added.
A chief backer of the measure,
Rep. Richard H. Ichord (D-Mo),
chairman of the House Internal
Security Committee, says it would
balance individual interests
against those of the nation and
would bar subversives from sen-
sitive positions in defense facilities
Thanksgiving
at. the UGLI
The Undergraduate Library yes-
terday announced its hours for the
Thanksgiving Weekend as follows:
Wednesday, Nov. 25, 8:00 a.m. to
midnight; Thursday, Nov. 26,
closed; Friday, Nov. 27, 1 p.m. to
midnight; Saturday, Nov. 28, 8
a.m. to 'midnight and Sunday,
Nov. 29, 1 p.m. to 2 a.m.
No books will fall due Nov. 26
through Nov. 29. Reserve books
will circulate for vacation use be-
ginning at noon, Wednesday, Nov.
25, and will be due by noon Mon-
day, Nov. 30. A limit of two books
per person for vacation use will be
the general rule.

Nixon asks
$1 billion
aid hike
WASHINGTON ) - Presi-
dent Nixon asked Congress
yesterday for an additional $1
billion in foreign aid, half of
which was earmarked f or
helping Israel build its mili-
tary potential
First indications were that the
request faces a rocky legislative
road.
The money is in addition to the
$2.8 billion Nixon had requested
earlier for foreign aid in this fis-
cal year.
Neighboring Arab states of Jor-
dan and Lebanon would receive
$30 million and $5 million respect-
ively for what White House aides
described as internal security
needs in those countries. Major
sums would also go to Cambodia,
South Korea, and South Vietnam.
Of the slightly more than $1
billion total in the Nixon pack-
age, $500 million would help Is-
rael finance "purchases of equip-
ment that havedbeen necessary to
maintain her defense capability,
and to ease the economic strain
caused by her expanded military
requirements."
Nixon described the money as
necessary to carry out plans for
reducing direct U.S. military com-
mitments abroad while increasing
the ability of allies to d e f e n d
themselves.
White House officials conceded,
however, that part of the need for
more money can be traced to the
U.S. intervention in Cambodia
and to events in the Middle East
which were not foreseen w h e i
Nixon made his original request
last January.
Cognizant of the fact that anti-
foreign-aid forces in Congress al-
ready have trimmed his original
request to $2.2 billion, Nixon call-
ed congressional leaders to the
White House yesterday afternoon
in an effort to win support for the
revised request.
Even before the White House
session, formidable opposition sur-
faced on Capitol Hill when the
Senatemajority leader, Sen. Mike
Mansfield (D-Mont.), told news-
men he opposes the added funds.
Mansfield said he would be glad
to listen to t h e administration
case but added "this simply will
add to the budget deficit which
already is going to far exceed the
original estimates."
Sen. J. W. Fulbright (D-Ark),
said he thinks new authorizing
legislation, not just a simple ap-
propriation bill, would be required
to clear the requested additional
aid for nations other than Is-
rael, for which Congress has au-
thorized additional assistance.

U dl

SHOP TONIGHT AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

KRYSTAL BAVARIAN
GLAS SKI PACKAGE

C

Paramount Pctures presenis
PAUL JOANNE ANTNOI
NEWMAN WOODWARD PERKI
"'WUSA
A STUART ROSERNPFRG - PAUt NIWMAN - JOHN FOREMAN PROOUCTION
c.r LAURENCE HARVEY Farly
" 1"COL *' O"I"" "F""ANW APUM

~NALGO+ ATENTR4S
C il~rrt .,RD.

mm~I
IN WS
-3:00-

INCLUDES:

Only $137.50

0

GARMONT PLASTIC BUCKLE BOOTS ..................... $45.00
KRYSTAL EPOXY FIBRE GLASS SKIS ..... .................. $75.00
(2 yr. unconditional guarantee)
TYROLIA STEP-IN BINDINGS ..,....... ....................$26.50
BARRECRAFTER ALUMINUM POLES ........... .............$ 7.00
INSTALLED AND TESTED .......... .....................$10.50
SAVE $25.00 total $163.00
HOURS: Mon, Wed, Thurs, & Fri, 10-9; Tues & Sat 10-6; Sun 12-5
2455 S. STATE ST.

SHOW TIMES
Mon.-Fri. 7:00-9:15

Sat.-Sun. 1:00-
5:00-7:00-9

U

FISH

FOWL

*
& OTHER CREATURES
A 4-

m

DINE IN or CARRY OUT

pi

MICHIGAN BANKARD

BANK AMERI KARD f

I

ART]

"GALA BENEFIT CONCERT"
for

____ _

1

brooch-types of m
cameos, rhineston
gold-tone filigrees
Each in the
collection, $3.

ock
es and
-4

The University Musical Society
UJR
RUBINSTEIN
World-renowned Pianist
will be heard
IN HILL AUDITORIUM

Psh & chips Luncheon
ONE PIECE OF F ISH+ CHIPS
sh & chips binum
TWO PIECES OF FISH + CHIPS
woyalfish snquet
TEN PIECES OF FISH, EVES S-7 '
chicken hmdeon
TWO PIECES Of CHICKEN+CHIPS
chicken binnelt
THREE PIECES. SLAW. ROLL
squius sp rab
NINE PIECES OF CHICKEN. SERVES 3-4
bukEs Mght
FIFTEEN PIECES OF CHICKEN. SERVES 5-7
TWEY-ONE PIECES OF CHICKEN. SERVES 7-9
hot conesb eefsmnibwch

.79
1.39
239
3.99
5.z9

.89
1010

w1
4S

FRIDAY, JAN. 22

- 8:30

"r9 1

rn J1, ,

TICKETS ON'SALE NOW-
Q.. 4,.. II I 4 3 1~

not ha , rchEoe s nbwich . 9
£C& N " £ 4- £ LA 4*aaA A

11 1

11

I I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan