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November 18, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-18

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CONTEMPORARY
JAZZ QUINTET
SATURDAY, NOV. 21, 8:30
TRUEBLOOD AUD.
"Their music is always of the moment, inaccessible,
its spiritual content, the constant state of change,
is perhaps the best way to characterize their
music." -DOWNBEAT MAGAZINE
TICKETS $2.00 at Union, Discount
Records, S.I. Store

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page three

(t 1 8

*41P 4ba

EWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE:
764-0554

Wednesday, November 18, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

1

news briefs
By The Associated Press
A 17-YEAR-OLD Arlington girl convicted of burning the
flag, won a one-year reprieve in Superior Court Tuesday--after
she agreed to carry a large American flag on a three-mile
march through Cambridge, Mass.
Martha A. Meyers appeared before Judge Frank W. Tomasello in
Middlesex Superior Court yesterday on appeal from her conviction
in District Court and a six-month jail term.
The judge offered to dismiss the charges against her if the girl
would carry the 5 x 8 foot flag on the march through the city and
stay out of trouble foi' one year.
THE FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD said yesterday that in-
dustrial production, one of the key barometers of the nation's
economy, fell by2.3 per cent in October.
The board said the United Auto Workers strike against General
Motors was responsible for about one half of the October decline in
the index.
The figure was 7 per cent below the peak recorded in July 1969.
A SOVIET MOONROVER, looking like an enclosed bathtub

Judges rule on subpoenas

Law & Business Fraternities
MIXER!
THURSDAY, NOV. 19
at 502 E. Madison (Phid)
NEXT TO S. QUAD

NEWSMAN WINS CASE

AAd.Vnn1 1 .

( - E- i i. u on wheels, rolled about the lunar surface yesterday, steered away
from craters and rocks by scientists on earth watching it on
television.
The eight-wheeled vehicle rolled down a gangplank from the
unmanned Luna 17 moonship three hours after making a soft landing
on the lunar surface. Luna 17 was launched from the Soviet Union
last Wednesday.
Petitioning n o w o e n for.After the landing, the Soviet news agency Tass said, ground
controllers checked out Luna 17's systems and made a television
survey of the lunar terrain around the landing site.
" " The moonrover carried scientific apparatus, control instruments,
e rl S tU d e nJ u d icia ry1television cameras and radio communications equipment, Tass said.
Theinstruments carried out "scientific investigations on the surface ofI
the moon at various distances from the landing spot."
8 Seats LIBYAN LEADER COL. MUAMMAR KADAFI concluded an
unannounced 24-hour visit to Syria yesterday and announced
Petitions and information available at that the overthrow of the Marxist regime was "reassuring."
Kadafi invited the new Syrian government to join Libya, Egypt
SGC off ics (1st Floor SAB) and the Sudan in their proposed federation in a broadcast on
FloorDamascus radio.
Kadafi said that Syria's new leaders had assured him that Syria
would be the "Eastern Arab fortress on Israel's border."
Nov. 22, at 5:00 * , *
DEFENSE SECRETARY MELVIN LAIRD indicated l a s t
WOMEN AND MEN OF ALL SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES nightthat an increase in military spending would be necessary "to
ARE URGED TO APPLY Laird, speaking at the Economics Club of New York, said that
the increased spending would be required to pay for weapons modern-
ization and the all-volunteer armed forces as well as increased
foreign military aid.

-Associated Press
Calley arrives at courthouse
Court-martial beis
for M Lai defendant

SAN FRANCISCO U - A
panel of federal judges ruled
yesterday that a federal grand
jury may not force a news-
man to appear or testify with-
out first showing a "compel-
ling public need" t h a t out-
w e i g h s First Amendment
guarantees of a free press, the
newsman's lawyer said.
John Bates, attorney for New
York Times newsman Earl Cald-
well, said a 16-page 9th Circuit
Court of Appeal decision to be re-
leased later rules in favor of Cald-
well in his contempt of court case.
Caldwell, a black, had been held
in contempt June 5 by U.S. Dis-
trict Court Judge Alfonse Zirpoll
for failing to appear before a fed-
eral grand jury investigating the
Black Panther party. Zirpoli stay-
ed execution of the order pending
outcome of the appeal to the Cir-
cuit Court.
Bates said he received a copy
of the opinion in the mail prior
to public announcement. In a tel-
ephone interview, he quoted the
court as writing "w h e r e It is
shown that the public's First
Amendment rights to be informed
would be jeopardized by a journ-
alist's appearance before a grand
Jury, even before such a witness
can be compelled to appear, the
government must make a show-
ing of a compelling need for the
witness' appearance."
On April 3, Zirpoli ruled Cald-
well must appear but would .not
have to disclose confidential as-
sociations unless the government
could prove that "compelling and
overriding national interest" re-
quired disclosure.
Caldwell's defense also asserted
the subpoena "very probably was
based on illegal electronic eves-
dropping," a c1aim Zirpoli re-
jected.
Caldwell, although supported by
the Times in his effort to protect
his sources had been fired by the
paper in June.
A memo to the staff of the
newspaper explained that "when a
reporter refuses to authenticate
his story the Times must, in a
formal sense, step aside," or have
doubt cast upon its own integrity.
The paper has continued to give
Caldwell"legal and financialas-
sistance however.
Caldwell's court battle has been
supported by many newsmen and
professional organizations, in-
cluding the Columbia Journalism
Review which wrote in its Fall
1970 issue that "Caldwell was try-
ing to give the old confidentiality
argument a new dimension - a
claim that journalists, as society's
auditors, must have a special in-
dependence to move freely in all
parts of that society."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by maU)
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

FT. BENNING, Ga. (A) - An
Army prosecutor began the court-
martial of Lt. William L. Calley
yesterday by charging that the
officer "shot down in cold blood"
unarmed men, women and chil-
dren at the tiny village of My Lai
in 1968.
Calley, one of 10 soldiers charg-
ed with committing atrocities at'
MyLai, is accused of the premed-
itated murder of 102 civilians.

r
---,

I

Laird's speech indicated a reversal of defense budget cuts and'
although he did not mention a sum Pentagon sources mentioned that
the increase could be as much as $1 billion.

TheMusic Center
will be open FRIDAY EVENINGS instead
of Monday Starting the week of Nov. 15

ASKS HALT TO NUCLEAR PLANTS
Scientist attacks AEC hearing

Our new store hours will be:
Mon-Thurs......... Th.9:00 a.m.-5:30,
FRIDAY.9:00 a.m.-8:30
Saturday.. .9:00 a.m.-5:30

p.m.
p.m.
p.m.

COME IN AND SEE US!
304 SOUTH THAYER
Opposite Hill Auditorium
665-8607 and 8
Smusic center, inc.

NEW YORK ()-Dr. John W.
Gofman, a leading critic of the
Atomic Energy Commission, said
yesterday he has decided not to
testify in a landmark AEC hear-
ing on a proposed nuclear power
plant because the hearing is "a
kangaroo court."
Gofman, who works for the
AEC-supported Lawrence Radi-
ation Laboratory in Livermore.
Calif., urged instead that those
opposed to nuclear power plants
work to get a referendum on the
ballot calling for a moratorium
on construction.
The scientist's latest attack on
the AEC came as an industry
group, the Atomic Industrial
Forum, met in Washington and

heard forum president, Sher-
man R. Knapp, express concern
that environmental g r o u p s
would delay nuclear growth by
legal "harassment."
Controversy over nuclear pow-
er has grown with the develop-
ing environmental c o n c e r n,
whereas only a few years ago
the concept of cheap, clean pow-
er from the atom was widely ac-
cepted.
Gofman, with his colleague,
Dr. Arthur R. Tamplin, have be-
come leaders in the anti-AEC
movement. They argue that the
AEC, charged with promoting
the use of nuclear power, should
not be entrusted with regulating
that use.

Capt. Aubrey Daniel, the prose-
cutor, made a 22-minute opening
statement to the six court-martial
board members assigned to hear
the case.
Daniel said that Calley's pla-
toon found the village undefended
when the soldiers entered it on a
combat mission. He said t h a t
Calley and some of his men used
"full bursts of automatic fire" to
shoot "unarmed and undefended
men, women and children."
Daniel said Calley's 1st Platoon
of Charlie -Company was in the
forefront of a helicopter assault
into the area immediately west
of My Lai at 7:30 a.m. that day.
A group of the villagers were
placed in charge of two of Calley's
men, Pvt. Paul Meadlo and Pfc.
Dennis Conti, Daniel said. Then,
referring to Calley, the prosecu-
tor continued, "he told Conti and
Meadlo, 'take care of these peo-
ple.' They didn't know what the
accused meant when he said, 'Take
care of these people.' They didn't
know he had formed his intent."
"Lt. Calley returns," Daniel was
saying in his even voice. "He finds
Meadlo and Conti. 'Why haven't
you taken care of these people?'
he asks. 'We have taken care of
them, we are guarding them,' he
is told. Calley says, 'I mean kill
'em, waste em.'"
"Some tried to run. They didn't
make it. They were shot down dead
in cold blood on that trail."

A major test of the issues has
arisen in the proposal to build
a nuclear power plant on Long
Island. The hearing for the
plant, under way, is the first
since the passage of major fed-
eral environmental legislation.
An environmental group, the
Lloyd Harbor Study Group, has
made the hearing a test case,
and billed Gofman as ane of
their major witnesses. A sum-
mary of his testimony had been
given to newsmen in advance.
"The hearing is a charade, a
waste of time," Gofman said.
"It's beneath my dignity to
testify before that kangeroo
court."

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Wednesday, Nov. 18
COMMANCHE STATION
dir. BUD BOETTICHER (1960)
Boetticher is often praised for his slow-mov-
ing action westerns-elaborate psycho-re-
action studies framed in real events from the
Old West. With Randolph Scott.
Thurs.-Sun.: Ray's THE APUTRILOGY
7 & 9:0575 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 7cAUDITORIUM

For the student body:
cI is

1 ! r

LCVI

13

CORDUROY
Slim Fits......$6.98
(All Colors)
DENIM
Bush Jeans .. $10.00
Bells ........ $8.00
Pre-Shrunk ... $7.50
Super Slims ... $6.98

M
t
M

Reulual

L.2. Hbums onl..
Just purchase a barrelY
ofColonel Sanders'
finger lickin' good-
- -n

State Street at Liberty

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND DEPARTMENT OF ART
PRESENT
PUCCINI'S OPERA
1" A rA"CAAE DIIT"TEDGI V'1 (C. ,R ;-i 1,.I ,k, \

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