100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 17, 1970 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, November 17, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine"

* Tuesday, November 17, 1 97G THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine'

olverines
on this and that
Woody Hays: Cool
and uncritical
eric siegel
WEST LAFAYETTE
OHIO STATE got its biggest scare of the season here Saturday,
squeaking by Purdue 10-7 on a 30 yard field goal with
2:04 left in the game, but venerable old Buckeye Coach Woody
Hayes seemed virtually unperturbed.;
Hayes, slick and dapper and looking for all the world like
a retired bank executive who removed his suit coat to go to the
men's rooms, displayed none of the irascibility and cantankerous-
ness that helped make him the legendary figure he is today.
He, emerged from the OSU locker room after talking to
his players and accepting congratulations on his victory
from President Nixon, and then conducted a. lengthy press
interview, smiling and laughing and answering all the ques-
tions that were put to him.
It was a far cry from the Woody Hayes who stuck his
head out the door of the visiting locker room at Michigan
Stadium last year, snapped, "All good things must come to
an end and that's what happened today," and then slammed
the door.
It was the Buckeyes' poorest offensive output scoring-wise
in ay game since the 1967 team beat Northwestern 6-2 in the
fourth game of the season, but Hayes didn't find fault with any-
one except the Purdue fans.
"How soon do we have to play here again-10 years?" he
asked to open' his press confei'ence. "That would be too soon.
Our kids couldn't hear a thing out there on the field. That's
one reason why we had so many broken plays."
Between the broken plays and the Purdue - defense, the
heralded, grind-em-out Buckeye offense gained only 255
yards, made just a dozen first downs, managed only three
sustained drives, had one punt blocked and another de-
flected, and had two of its three fumbles recovered by the
Boilermakers.
Oh, yes, OSU also converted on just five of 16 third
down situations, and punted to three others.
But Hayes, who has been known to be critical of sub-par
performances at times, did not find fault with the offense. In-
stead, he praised the efforts of the Buckeyes' defensive unit.
"They only got three first downs?" Hayes said. "Isn't that
something. Any time you hold a Big Ten team to only three
first downs you're doing well. Our kids were really something
on defense. We totally stopped them."
Hayes, noting the Buckeyes' harassment of sophomore
quarterback Gary Danielson, who completed only two of 12
passes, had two passes intercepted and gained a negative
56 yards rushing, smiled broadly. "The only game we haven't
gotten to the passer was the Minnesota game, he said. "A
quarterback can't throw too well sitting on the ground."
Even when he talk turned to the offense, Hayes still
would not find fault with his team. "Purdue rated well
on defense all year. We had some trouble getting the ball
in the air, but we moved the ball in spurts," he said.
Ron Maciejowski, who replaced Rex Kern in the second
quarter, sat out in the third, and then came back in the last
period to. lead the Buckeyes on a 66 yard march that led to
the winning score, received high praise from his coach. And
Hayes also came to the defense of Kern, who wound up with a
negative 27 yards rushing and completed only one of six passes
for three yards.
"Rex has a tough time getting warmed up," Hayes said.
"I don't know who will start next week. I expect both our
quarterbacks to see quite a bit of action."
Despite all his expansiveness, and though he didn't
come out and say it, the Buckeyes' last gasp win over Pur-
due must be something of a disappointment to Woody.
Granted that comparative scores don't mean much (last
year, OSU beat Michigan State, 54-21; MSU beat Michigan,
23-12; and the Wolverines beat OSU, 24-12), Michigan's
29-0 win over Purdue earlier in the year is no great cause
for concern. But that still doesn't discount the fact that, a
week before the showdown for the Big Ten championship,
Ohio Sate could not come up with a super-effort to give
them some sorely needed momentum.
In fact, the Buckeyes haven't been impressive since they beat
the Spartans 29-0 five weeks ago, and they haven't been really
overpowering since they trounced Texas A&M 56-13 in the
season opener.
And so Woody Hayes, who had spent the week talking about
how his team should still be number one and how Rex Kern
was not receiving enough consideration in the debate ever who

should win the Heisman trophy, Saturday was praising his de-
fense, defending his offense, and sloughing over a lot of not-so-
little mistakes.
If nothing else, one can bet that this week Hayes will
bring to bear all the charm and expansiveness as well as the
cantankerousness, irascibility but above all the knowledge
that has helped his teams compile an overall record of
125-42-7 as he primes his team for its game against Mich-'
igan.
"Yes, I sure would have like to have a better perform-
ance offensively before the Michigan game, but we didn't
get it," Hayes said Saturday.
Will Ohio State be ready for the game? "It's the only game
we've got left," Hayes said, unexpansively and not :iniling.

primed
By PAT ATKINS
"Everyone told me my team
would have a letdown coming
back from the Rose Bowl,"
Michigan Coach Bo Schembech-
ler said yesterday afternoon.
Then, with a mental shrug and
a teasing grin, he added haf-
accusingly, "Well, I haven't seen
Neither has a n y o n e else,
though it is a sure bet that Ohio
State Coach Woody Hayes will
be doing all in his considerable
power to give a national tele-
vision audience that opportuni-
ty this coming Saturday.
"Sure this week is more im-
portant than the first nine
w e e k s," Schembechler said.
"What greater challenge could
you have?"
Already last Saturday's 55-0
whitewash of Iowa has become
a part of a different season. As
almost an after thought the
Champions of the Week were an-
nounced-Marty Huff on de-
fense and Jack Harpring on of-
fense.
It's strange, how it is going
into this game." Schembechler
mused. "I can hardly remember
who started last weekend."
One who still remembers a
little painfully, tailback Billy
Taylor, will be ready for action
against Ohio State. He bruised
his elbow in the third quarter 1
of the Hawkeye game, but the
injury was not serious.,
Besides, as Schembechler as-
serts, "There are no injuries ;
going into a game like this. 1
There's no such thing as bumps '
and bruises. You don't have time1
to think of them."
Schembechler, expansive and
full of "it depends," was not the
least bit concerned about his :
obvious sidestepping of the +
nasty questions. Like being ask-+
ed about the home field ad- ;
vantage and replying, "Just so
they keep the people off the l
field."
Or responding to whether
you play to tie or win after
you've scored a touchdown and
you're down by one in the clos- +

for

big

AP POLL:
test M' moves up to fourth

By The Associated Press
On the strength of their 55-0
rout of Iowa, the Michigan Wol-
verines have moved into fourth
place in the Associated Press Col-
lege football poll. The Michigan
win, coupled with Nebraska's 51-
13 stomping of Kansas State and
Ohio State's narrow victory over
Purdue moved both the Wolver-
ines and the Cornhuskers ahead of
daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
SANDI GENIS
the Buckeyes, who now find them-
selves in fifth.
Texas took over first by virtue
of its 58-0 destruction of Texas
Christian and Notre Dame's 10-7
victory over Georgia Tech. Thel
Longhorns gathered 26 of the 46
first place votes, and had 816
points in all, far ahead of Notre
Dame's 705.
Third ranked Nebraska follow-

ed closely with 694 points and five operating without Archie Man-
votes for the top spot. Michigan, ping.
with six first place votes, one more Shug Jordan's Auburn Tigers,
than the Cornhuskers, had 682 once considered the best team in
points to run a close fourth. the South, dropped to 13th after
Ohio State, once the top rank- a 31-17 loss to, Georgia. S a n
ed team in the country, was a dis- Diego State, a former college divi-
tant fifth with 643 points and sion power now in the big time,
only one first place vote. The only enjoys its highest ranking ever
other team to receive a vote for in the fourteenth position. Anoth-
the top place was Arizona State, er relative newcomer to the ranks
the ninth rated team, of the major college powers, Tol-
Bruce McLard's 60 yard field edo, climbed to 15th with their
goal helped lift Arkansas to a 36-.3 22nd straight victory.
victory over Southern Methodist Ivy League power Dartmouth,
and into sixth place. The Razor- enjoying its finest season in years,
backs have now won eight straight follows the Rockets closely, well
games ince an opening game loss ahead of Georgia Tech, the seven-
to Stanford, and are eyeing their teenth team.
season ending battle with Texas. 1. Texas 26 8-0' 816
Once beaten Louisiana S t a t e 2. Notre Dame 6-0 705
moved into seventh place with a 3. Nebraska 5 9-0--1 694
38-7 drubbing of Kentucky. T h'e s5.Mhiate 6 8-0 643
Tigers now risk their ranking with 6. Arkansas 8-1 413
successive games against N o t r e 7. Louisiana State 7--1 399
Dame and Mississippi. Tennessee, 8. Tennessee 7-1 324
9. Arizona State 1 8-0 231
now the eighth place team, was :10 .Air Forces.9-1 290
idle last week. 11. stanford 8-2 206
Arizona State, still unbeaten 12. Mississippi 7-1 186
and untied, and Air Force, impres- 13. Auburn 7-2 119
sive winner over Stanford, round 14 San Diego state 9-0 73
15. Toledo 10-0 71
out the Top Ten. Jim Plunkett and 16. Dartmouth 8-0 68
his Indians, though twice beaten, 17. Georgia Tech 7-3 39
still hold on to' the eleventh spot, 18. Northwestern 5-4 20
ust ahead of Mississippi, n o w 19. Texas Tech 8--2 16
jut20. Pekn state 6- 3 16

-Daily-Terry McCarthy
Gusich (4) and Moore (97) close in

ing seconds. "That's a tough one
to answer. There's a lot going,
through your mind just then. It
depends on the situation, on
what we want to get out of the
game at that time." Schem-
bechler paused, and then joked,
"No, it actually, it depends on
how our two point plays go in
practice this week."
More concerns Schembechler
this week than two point plays,
since, as has said, football is an
emotional game. But he caution-
ed, "Don't overestimate how you
get a team up for the game. A
lot of it is emotional, but a col-
lege football player is much
more knoweledgeable than he
used to be.
"He sees the game films and
discusses opponents with the
coaches. The players know what

they're up against. They can
see it all in front of them."
But Schembechler reported
that the Buckeyes have the edge
in this department. "He has
more films than I do because
we've played one more game,"
an amused Schembechler said.
Someone asked him whether
he had ever hand an undefeated
season.
Schembechler thought a mo-
ment .and replied, "I've never
had an undefeated season as a
coach. The only other time I've
been involved in an undefeated
season was when I was an as-
sistant coach."
"Under whom?" another ask-
ed leadingly.
Not surprisingly, Schembech-
ler refused to anwser that, the
nastiest question of all.

Reed attacks no-repeat rule-
Asr Force accepts Sugyar bid
CHICAGO 0P) - Commissioner Such would be the case this year defeat, their latest victory being

Bill Reed of the Big Ten said yes-
terday he has always been in favor
of the conference sending only its;
champion to the Rose Bowl.

1
A
t
l

if Michigan defeats Ohio State
Saturday. The Wolverines, who
represented the Big Ten in the
Rose Bowl as co-champions last

"We have a great deal at stake year, would have to yield to Ohio
in the Rose Bowl and feel we State.
should make it as great an at- Meanwhile, the Falcons of Air
traction as possible,'' said Reed.
Force have accepted a bid to play
the, no-repeat rule imposed by in the Sugar Bowl on New Year's
Big Ten schools ususally comes Day against an opponent to be
under attack when the possibility
arises that the champion cannotj named later. The Falcons have
represent the conference. won nine games against only one
. .T...e ss.. ............
Bi Ten Stnding

a 31-14 upset of Stanford.
'"One argument in favor of the
no-repeat rule," said Reed "is that
it doesn't happen often enough to
have much effect. I would turn
that around and say if it doesn't
operate frequently then let the
champion go."
Only four times in the 24 years:
of the pact has the Big Ten sent
its No. 2 team and all four re-
turned victoriously. They were
Northwestern in- 1948, Michigan
State 1955, Minnesota 1961 fand!
Purdue 1966.
"The original purpose of the
conference in voting the no-re-
peat rule was that no school set
up a Rose Bowl hierarchy," said
Reed. "This was a sound policyj
but the nature of the competition
in the last 15 years shows there is
not much danger in a hierarchy
taking over."
Neither are there any financial
advantages because the money
from the Rose Bowl is divided!

-Dally-Denny Gainer
BILLY TAYLOR (42), Wolverine tailback; sweeps end in last Saturday's 55-0 obliteration of Iowa.
Taylor gained 189 yards in the game, running his season's total to 880. Another such game would
put him over one thousand for the season, making him the second Michigan back to do so.

....

1I

Conference Games

MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Northwestern
Michigan State
Iowa
Minnesota
Wisconsin
Purdue
Illinois
Indiana

W L
6 0
6 0
5 1
3 3
2 3
2 3
2 4

T PF
0 228
0 163
0 169
0 126
1 83
1 95
0 109
0 80
0 93
0 69

PA
48
61
73
107
157
118
130
127
218
172

Wy
9
8
5
4
2
3
3
3
3
1

All
L
0
0
4
5
6
5
5
6
6
8

Games
T PF PA
0 279 70
0 253 84
0 210 141
0 170 192
1 107 246
1 166 194
1 159 181
0 121 187
0 145 257
0 102 260

For the Student Body:
DENIM
FLARES
4.88
Regular $8.00 Quality

PROBLEMS, REAL & IMAGINED
WITH PESTICIDES
DOCTOR ROLF HARTU NG
DEPT. OF TOXICOLOGY
TUESDAY, NOV. 17-8 P.M.
Room 1040-School of Not. Res.
Bring Questions for Discussion
ENACT ECOLOGY CENTER

I

p

:

1
1
1

5
5
5

among the universities.

THIS WEEK'S GAMES
MICHIGAN at Ohio State
Indiana at Purdue
Illinois at Iowa
Michigan State at Northwestern
Minnesotatat Wisconsin

{Jrw . r........
:

1

ScOres

NBA
Yesterday'sAResults
Baltimore 98, Cleveland 86
Milwaukee 119, San Francisco 100
Buffalo 112, Seattle 103
San Diego at Portland, inc.
Join The Daily Staff
You1II never
go wrong by
buying
art supplies
AT

1+%ce"'~w6

I!

FREE BILLIARDS INSTRUCTION
Pocket & 3-Cushion
10 A.M.-NOON, SAT.
UNION
reduced rates
9 A.M.-Noon, Mon.-Sat.
1 -6 P.M. Sunday
IMPORTANT!
EVERY PAINT STORE SELLS PAINT
WE FEATURE:
" CANDLE MAKING SUPPLIES
" ART SUPPLIES
" PICTURE FRAMING SUPPLIES
COME ON OUT AND GET ACOUAINTED

FOR UNIVERSITY
PEOPLE WHO CARE
WE NOW HAVE
4 SHOPS TO SERVE YOU
" ARBORLAND
" MAPLE VILLAGE
" LIBERTY OFF STATE
" EAST UNIV. OFF SO. UNIV.
THE DASCOLA BARBERS

I

State Street at Liberty

I

I

I

CUSTER'S LAST STAND $21.95

was nothing like this. A stand or a walk in Bates warm-lined
hnot makes friends with nur feet n Innk rv nId-west

i

SI

~J I I'L.J~ ~ ~.l-t.fe~

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan