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November 15, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-15

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I_,

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Reduced Seats on sale at
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Sat.-Sun.-Nov. 14-15
PE RSONA
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neWS briefs
By The Associated Press
THIRTEEN IRAQI POLITICAL PRISONERS, including form-
er Chief of Staff Gen. Ibrahim Feisal al Ansari, have been re-
leased, the government announced yesterday.
The act was seen as a move to placate opposition and -form a
national political front. Informed sources said about 50 other prisoners
not named in the list were freed earlier. Former Prime Minister Abdel
Rahman Bazzar was among them.
Ansari was arrested in 1968. S i a d i a h Jabr, daughter of a
former prime minister, also was freed. She was jailed in January
on charges of conspiracy against the ruling National Revolutionary
Command Council.
WEST GERMANY and communist Poland announced early
yesterday they had agreed on a draft treaty to normalize rela-
tions after 21 years of enmity.
A West German press spokesman told newsmen after the nego-
tiating teams had met for a marathon five hours that the treaty would
be initialled Nov. 18.
Negotiating teams headed by West German Foreign Minister
Walter Scheel and his Polish counterpart, Stefan Jedrychowsk, met
into the early hours in the final session of the present round of talks
that lasted 11 days.
Sources close to the talks said it was agreed that the treaty text,
will be published at the time of signing - not at the initialing cere-
mony.
Scheel will initial the treaty for West Germany but the signing
is expected to be carried out by Chancellor Willy Brandt, since
the Poles have made it known they would like to see him in Warsaw.
The sources stressed there was no difference of opinion on the
treaty between Bonn and its allies.
* * e

page three

C14C

iri iottn

EWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PUONE:
764-0554

Sunday, November 15, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

I
ME

-Associated Press
GIs go to Pot?
This photograph, according the CBS f r o m whose television
monitor it was made, shows soldiers smoking marijuana at a base
50 miles north of Saigon. A pipeful of grass is placed in the
breech of the shotgun then blown on to get high.
PASSAGE UNLIKELY-
Sexism amendment
scorned bycoalition

.Daily Classifieds
RrinR Roelts

--__ -__ __________THE COURT-MARTIAL of an Army Sergeant in the alleged
My Lai massacre resumes at Ft. Hood, Texas tomorrow after a WAS
3Y2-week recess, with the defense hopeful it eventually will be coalitic
allowed to put Lt. William Calley on the witness stand. . Img te
Calley is on trial at Ft. Benning, Ga., on charges of murdering constit
THE PILOT PEOPLE 102 Vietnamese civilians at My Lai on March 16, 1968. An attempt sex dis
to complete the jury selection in the Calley case will also be made fizzled
tomorrow. Lead
present a The attorney for Sgt. David Mitchell, on trial at Ft. Hood on ganizat
a charge of assault with intent to murder, has subpoenaed Calley as wouldr
a defense witness. But there has been no word on whether Army they a
officials will allow Calley to appear at the Mitchell court-martial. Birchl
rhno-hold;
I whistle
A DOZEN NATIONS proposed yesterday that the U.N. Gen- ago.
eral Assembly urge an immediate end to the testing and deploy- After
ment of nuclear weapon systems to help the U.S.-Soviet strategic ence or
arms limitation talks now going on in Finland. for the
The 12 neutral members among the 25 countries active on the their-i
Geneva disarmament committee circulated a resolution to that effect sembla
for consideration in the disarmament debate currently in progress in meant,
the assembly's Main Political Committee. ed, it's
POLITICAL CLOWNS FROGS FORETELL DOOM?
UNITING THEATRE *
Malysinsfea atasi.
AND REVOLUTION R R Sians ear c
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia A) - Hardly a same year Malaya's 12-y
Monday, November 16 TICKETS $1:50 at tear was shed for the hundreds who croaked in munist terrorists brokec
H, Fishbowl and S.U. battle. But the week-long amphibious war, which -In early 1969, fro
8 P.M. B Fishbowe andus U. was fought by hopping and biting, has unsettled Penng, went into actio
UNION BALLROOM Centicore Bookshop soothsayers in this superstitious nation. race riots that staggere
Combatants were frogs. Two armies of them, the capital of Kuala Lun
DOING: totaling in the thousands, had a no-webs-barred Zoologists say the w
war from last Saturday until Thursday over the to limited, properly sedu
scant few breeding grounds left by unusually high rak State game wardenI
Seize the Time-ag it-prop documentary on the BPP and Bobby Seale rains. ed by telephone, said n
The Independent Female, or, A Man Has HIS Pride Malayan veterans recall that frog battles are frogs fought but added:
not rare here, but large numbers of the popula- Fighting starts all a
tion firmly believe big ones occur only before a sudden flurry of frogleg
national calamity, and this was one of the big- frogs rip and tear at ea
gest. Some bystanders eve
"___________h__ _ _cnnffof tha f fi,..-m gh t Cha i iA d h th.. tn.r

.'

HINGTON (R) - With a
on of women's. groups scorn-
latest advances of the fick-
ate, the struggle for greater
utional guarantees against
crimination apparently has
in its most promising year.
ers of women's rights or-
ions have declared they
rather leave things the way
re than settle for Sen.
Bayh's substitute for the
ds-barredamendment that
d through the House weeks
a women's news confer-
n Thursday, a spokesman,
eIndiana Democrat s a i d
failure to support Bayh's
nute plan to rescue some
.nce of t h e amendment
"As far as we're concern-
dead."

[rople
ear emergency with Com-
out; and
gs at Butterworth, near
n. Two weeks later violent
ed the nation erupted in
mpur.
ars are fought over rights
ctive mating grounds. Pe-
Mohammed Khan, reach-
he had no idea why the
"Elephants do it too."
t once, with the scene a
s. Jaws gnash audibly as
ach other.
pn report frogs carry off
n.
ned to the same place -
the next day in smaller
ell back to regroup and,
nother skirmish.
they all disappeared to
ts and the war was over.

Finding fault with t h e Bayh
substitute Thursday were officials
from the National Woman's Party,
the National Organization for
Women, t h e President's Task
Force on Women's Rights and Re-
sponsibilities.
Bayh originahy led what ap-
peared to be an easy fight to pass
the House version, but many of
t h e 80 other senators officially
listed as sponsors of the measure
had second thoughts.
When it became obvious it
could not pass the Senate - as it
had twice before in years when
the House balked - Bayh set out
to find a compromise.
The Bayh substitute is the first.
order of business for a returning
Senate this week, but it appar-
ently will be removed from the
calendar without protest.
The original version of the
amendment reads simply that
"equality of rights under the law
shall not be denied or abridged
by the United States or any state
on account of sex."
Bayh's proposal calls instead
for extending the 14th Amend-
ment's equal protection clause to
sex discrimination cases, but also
would "recognize the need for a
flexible standard in cases where
differen t threatment under the
law may be justified."
Women's groups object the ad-
ded language would prove an ex-
cuse to continue discriminatory
practices, particularly in employ-
ment.
The original version was intro-
duced 47 y e a r s ago. In recent
times, it was mostly the hostility
of Judiciary Committee chairman
Emanuel Celler (D-N.Y.), that
prevented it from reaching the
full House until this summer.
Rep. Martha Griffiths (D-
Mich.), won support of two-thirds
of her colleagues to force Celler's
committeelto dischargethe pro-
posed amendement for the victor-
ious House vote.

Syria cup
puts Assad
"
n power
DAMASCUS DP - Syria's
eighth coup in 24 years of in-
dependence w a s described
here yesterday as a battle for
internal political survival by
groups of the 'Baath Socialist
party, with foreign policies
not an immediate factor.
The winner was Gen. Hafez al
Assad, the defense minister and
chief of the Soviet-equipped Syr-
ian air force. The losers were Gen.
Salah Jadid, leader of the party,
President Noureddin Atassi and
former Premier Youssef Zayyen,
all Marxists.
Diplomats said it was not clear
if the potmidnight coup had
anything to do with the defeat
handed Syria's tank forces in Jor-
dan's civil war in September. It
is known that Assad refused to
provide air support for the tanks
lest Israel's jets launch retalia-
tory strikes.
Assad was described as a mod-
erate. Arab diplomats said that
while the basic cause of the coup
was internal politics there was a
possibility that Syria now-would
abandon its go-it-alone attitude
in the fight against Israel and
cooperate more closely with the
rest of the Arab world.
Syria refused to sign the U.S.-
initiated Middle E a s t cease-fire
last August along with Egypt an
Jordan.
Unlike the previous coups and
the dozen minor revolts in Syria
since it gained independence from
France in 1946, this government
turnover lacked t h e usual tank
rumblings in the streets and the
presence of military power.
In fact, most inhabitants of La-
mascus awoke yesterday morning
unaware that Assad had seized
power and that the old leaders
were in jail.
In its broadcasts, Radio Da-
mascus made no mention of the
coup.
The capital was calm. Shoppers
thronged the bazaars as usual and
government ministries were open
for business.
According to the Arab UIplo-
mats, Assad and his followers
surprised Atassi, Jadid and Zay-
yen at their homes late Friday,
the Moslem sabbath.
Although Jadid was listed only
as assistant secretary-general of
the party, he has the power be-
hind the regime.
The diplomats said Assad's move
was not an immediate attempt to
make radical changes in Syria's
policy.
"Jadid tried to drum Assad out
of the party by removing him as
defense minister," one diplomatic
informant said. "Assad simply
moved first to assert his authority
once and for all."
Assad is on record in the past of
protesting Syria's dependence on
the Soviet Union for military aid.
But informants in Damascus dis-
counted suggestions t h a t Assad
might curtail the activities of So-
viet military advisers in Syria or
weaken links with Moscow.
"The Soviet Union supplies all
of Syria's weapons and much o
its ammunition," onediplomat
said. "Assad needs a strong arm~
my and the army cannot be strong
without Russian support."
ow

Otners scoii at the idea that zrog ights mignt
be a bad omen, but old-timers recall:
-In the early 1940's frogs clashed furiously,
leaving hundreds dead, in separate encounters in
Kedah and Malacca states. Soon after, the Jap-
anese invaded and occupied Malaya;
-In 1948, frogs went to war in Kedah. That

Lner r eaa w enLn ey cai
The battalions returr
near a Hindu temple -
numbers. Again, they f
later in the week, had ar
Then, mysteriously,
their various frog haunt

."::: r:: J'....J.J'...... .............. r...J...Y...
. . ......... .... .. ... .......rr............. .. ..................... . .............. ...

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RCA VICTOR
TELEVISION PORTABLES
See the good selection of RCA Victor color and black
and white TV's at the L.M.S.

Phone
NO 2-0675

MUCSOP'

41
E. Lib

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CONTEMPORARY
JAZZ QUINTET.
SATURDAY, NOV. 21, 8:30
TRUEBLOOD AUD.
"Their music is always of the moment, inaccessible;
its spiritual content, the constant state of change,
is perhaps the best way to characterize their
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TICKETS $2.00 at Union, Discount
Records, S.I. Store

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ININGROOM&CARRYOUT 'a
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Monday-Tuesday

BLACK STUDENT UNION
BENEFIT RALLY
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GUEST SPEAKER:
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