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November 13, 1970 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-13

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, November 13, 1970

Page Ten THEII IIIII MICHIG-AN- - --DAIL--Y- --r---ay-,- NovemberI III 1 3,IIII1970II

_

Candidates
file for 7
SGC seats.
18 students have filed state-
ments of candidacy for the seven
at-large seats to be filled in next
week's Student Government Coun-
cil (SGC) election.
Among the 18 are these incum-
bents, all of whom were appointed
to fill vacancies on SGC: Alan
Ackerman, '72L, Henry Clay, '72,
Andre Hunt, '74, and Paul Teich,
'71, who is administrative vice-
president.
The other candidates are: Russ
Garland, '72, Jay Hack, '73, Marn-
ie Heyn, '71, David Jones, '73, Jim
Kent, '72, Jeff Lewin, '73, Jeanne
Lenzer,. '74, Lawson Nagel, '71,
ark Ruessmann, '71, Brad
chram, '72, Brian Spears, '71, Ed-
ward Stieg, '74, Paul Travis, '73
and Bahr Weiss, '72.
Also to be voted on at the elec-
tion is this referendum: "Should'
two stndents and two faculty be
seated with the Board of Regents,
said students and faculty to have
all regental privileges except the
right of vote?"
Members of the literary college
will also be electing eight mem-
bers-at-large to the LSA student
government executive council.
Only one incumbent, B o b
Schwartz, will be running. j
The other candidates are Sue{
Steigerwalt, Rick Ratner, F r a n
Stier, Paula Fried, Russ Bikoff,
Fran Hymen, Pete Prahar, Barb
Rackers, Ed Roberts, James
Bridges, Charles Young, Andrew
Rogers, and James E. Dillon. t
Elections will be next Tues.,
Wed, and Thurs., Nov. 17-19.
Govt. mav

UAW unit

Tighter drug

I U

accepts pact laws asked
" L L C Al(Continued from Page 1)

E

jUULUIL "Iri.

-Associated Press
Deficit to rise
Treasury Secretary David M. Kennedy, speaking at a New Eng-
land Council Conference, said that the federal deficit would be
higher than the $1.3 billion that had been estiniated by Admin-
istration officials.
MILLIKEN PROPOSAL:
State House panel
refuses budget sashl
(Continued from Page 1> between the projected $62 million
tures, to submit proposed budget deficit and the proposed $58.5 mil-
cuts to the appropriate commit- lion budget cut.
tees in both houses of the state In his proposed cuts, Milliken
legislature. had asked that the Legislature
Zollar said that Michigan State cut $2.7 imillion in capital outlay
University, Wayne State Univer- appropriations to five state uni-
sity and Michigan have antici- versities, including Michigan State

(Continued from Pag e 1)
A Union official estimated it
would take at least a week for lo-
cal unions to complete their rati-
fication vote. And he said it might
take considerably longer in locals,
currently without at-the-plant
settlements.
Contract provisions, withheld
until yesterday's GM council meet-
ing, included:
-An average first-year wage
increase of 51 cents an hour, im-
proved by three percent in each
of the last two years of the pact.
The current average hourly wage E
of a GM worker is $4.02;
-Restoration of unlimited cost-
of-living allowances under which
wages are raised up or down in
accordance with changes in the
Consumer Price Index; and
-Retirement at $500 a month
after 30 years service for persons
age 58 in the second year of the
contract and at age 56 in the
third year.
GM said it had to have a con-
tract by next Wednesday in or-
der to resume full production by
Dec. 1.
In other areas, the union was
successful in resisting GM's de-
mand that workers start paying a
share of their hospital and medi-
cal insurance premiums.
Retirees, eligible surviving wid-
ows and eligible dependents will
now be covered by the prescrip-
tion drug program, under which
the worker pays only the first $2
of each prescription.
The company also agreed to in-
crease its maximum payment to
the Supplemental Unemployment
Benefit (SUB) fund from seven to
ten cents an hour per worker. The
SUB fund is the source of pay-
ments to workers who are laid off.
The local contracts, which sup-
plement the national agreement,'
remain unsettled at 68 of GM's
155 bargaining units in the Uni-
ted States. That figure includes
18 of 24 assembly plants and 12
of 54 so-called key plants.
Bargainnig is continuing on a
contract covering 22,100 striking
GM workers in Canada. Five of
the firm's seven Canadian bar-
gaining units have settled local
contracts.

long term campaigns" which would
include:
-The elimination of drug plan-
tations; the institution of strict
controls on pharmecutical pro-
ducts; and
-The reintegration of drug-
taking youths back into a society
"which can offer them some
idtal."
B. J. George, Jr., a law profes-
sor at New York University, crit-
icized current drug laws in the
United States.
"The strong emphasis in t h e
United States on heavy penalties
to prevent and control drug addic-
tion and abuse may be unwise and
essentially ineffective,' 'he said.
Criminal law enforcement
should be directed at the n o n -
addict trafficker and not at ad-
dicts themselves, George s a i d ,
adding that medical treatment, in-
cluding maintenance therapy,
should be approved and underwrit-
ten.

CANTERBURY HOUSE

7:30 Friday evening

Ai

Sponsored by the Office of Religious Affairs

COMMU N ES-COLLECTIVES
FAMILIES AND FRIENDS
RETHINKING THE FAMILY?
come talk together with
STEPHEN AND FAMILY-
A GROUP MARRIAGE

01

I

pated a hiring "freeze" and al-
ready implemented one.
en sLbsidieS Vice President for State Rela-
tions and Planning Fedele Fauri
(Continued from Page 1) denied this and said that the Uni-
The students who would be af- versity did not anticipate such a
fected by an end. to interest sub- "freeze."
sidies are not wealthy. In a time "Almost any amount cut would
of sharply rising college costs, op- be difficult because we've been op-
ponents of the Nixon proposals erating on a very restricted budget
argue, students in the $10-15,000 all year," said Fauri.
adjusted income range w o u 1 d Budget officials had explained
have to borrow at interest rates that the administration expected
of at least nine or ten percent- an upturn in the economy to
and pay them cumulated even for erase the $3.5 million difference
the time they are in school. It
would substantially increase the
cost of college for over half a mil-
lion middle-income students. For the student
Currently, the proposals, 'which Fo th sudnt body:
could take effect in 1971-72, are
on the docket of the House- sub- Genuine
committee on higher education.
According to an aide to Rep. Mar- Authentic
vin Esch (R-Ann Arbor), no ac-
tion will be taken on the propos- 1 Navy
als until the new Congress con-
venes in January. Then, hearings
will probably, begin. AT
Brown speculates that the ad-
ministration proposals may be
considerably changed from their
original form by the time the sub- ' $2 5
committee begins work on them.
So far, it remains unclear what Sizes 34 to 46
Congressional reaction will be tol
the proposals. I
Zoology Prof. George W. Saund-
ers Jr. has been named secretary
of the American Society of Lim-
nology and Oceanography.
Prof. Saunders was elected to
the three-year term during the State Street at Liberty
society's annual meeting in Kings-
ton, R.I., Aug. 25-29.

University, but passed over Wayne
State University and Michigan.
Capital outlay refers to con-r
struction, repair and remodelling
of campus buildings.
The University had not been
considered for such a cut, said As-
sistant State Budget Director Paul
Wilden, because it "has no pro-
jects in a stage of construction
other than already in progress ork
just beginning."

INTERESTED
IN AN
OVERSEAS
CAREER?
MR. BERTRAND PINARD
will be on the campus
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17
to discuss qualifications for
advanced study at
THUNDERBIRD
GRADUATE SCHOOL
and job opportunities
in the field of
INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
Interviews may be scheduled at
The Placement Office
THUNDERBIRD
GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF
INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
(Formerly: The American Institute
for Foreign Trade)
P. 0. Box 191
Phoenix, Ariona 85001
Affiliated with
The American Management Association

LIVE IT UP!
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Dine with Us and
Dance to the Music of

MY FRIENDS
THIS WEEKEND

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A trio of handsome sweaters made in England in original colours
specially created by Alan :Paine.
Henley (left). Classic v-neck lambswool pullover with
authentic Alan Paine saddle shoulder. $17.00
Clandon (center). Soft-front fine lambswool cardigan,
two pockets. $23.50
Radley (right). Campus classic .. authentic crew-neck
Shetland, saddle shoulder. $1
Cable knits and body sweaters from 18.00
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