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November 13, 1970 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-13

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page three

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Sfr~tgi!3n

43a' 1y

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Here's the
Old Heidelberg
menu
Look
at the prices.

Friday, November 13, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

ne ws briefs
By The Associated Press
MORE MONEY may be requested of Congress by the Nixon
administration for military assistance to Cambodia and Israel, a
State Department spokesman said yesterday.
Press officer Robert J. McCloskey said the Cambodian aid con-
templated would be over the $40 million made available last July.
Estimates for this new aid range up to $10 million.
Military aid to Israel was approved by Congress before the elec-
tion recess.
DISCOUNT RATES have now been reduced at 11 of the 12
Federal Reserve Binks.
Five banks were added to the Reserve Board's list yesterday and
can now loan money to other banks at a 5% percent interest rate
instead of the former 6 percent rate.
While many of these secondary banks have correspondingly low-
ered their rates, economists doubt any immediate effect on the con-
sumer.
NINE PERSONS were wounded yesterday, including four po-
licemen, during a series of shootings and a gun battle with blacks
in Carbondale, Ill.
A security guard at Southern Illinois University was the first
wounded when he was shot attempting to stop a truck for a traffic
violatioon near the college campus, police said.
The assailant then fled to a black neighborhood and police pur-
suing the man became engaged in a gun battle with blacks firing
from a house and two other areas of the community.
Police say those in the house identified themselves as Black Pan-
thers, and three surrendered when tear gas was fired at them.
EIGHT PERSONS who stripped before a crowd of 80 at
Iowa's Grinnell College have taken their conviction of "open and
gross lewdness" to the Supreme Court.
The Grinnell 8 were fined $200 apiece after their disrobing Feb.
5, 1969 to protest a campus visit of a Playboy Magazine representa-
tive. Subsequent appeals in Iowa were rejected.
They claim freedom of speech means freedom to strip.
JUSTICE THOMAS KAVANAGH of Lansing has been named
as the next Chief Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court by mem-
bers of that body.
Democrat Kavanagh replaces the Court's only Republican, Tho-
mas Brennan, in that post. Brennan declined to run.
* * * *
A PRIVATE CORPORATION has launched a court battle to
fight television violence.
The Foundation to Improve Television has asked the U.S. Dis-{
trict Court in Washington, D.C., to rule that "fictionalized violence
and brutality" on a local TV program cause "irreparable damage" to
children and violate their rights under the Fifth Amendment.

BURIED IN VILLAGE

France

mourns

De

Gaulle

PARIS (M - Charles de Gaulle was buried in a village
churchyard yesterday, and later hundreds of thousands of
Frenchmen, in a great outpouring of grief, marched through
darkness and rain to the Arch of Triumph.
The day of requiem was in three stages. First 100 world
leaders gathered at Notre Dame Cathedral to hear Mass.
Four hours later the funeral itself began at Colombey les
Deux Eglises, 160 miles away. Then, after nightfall, came
the flood of emotion of Parisians drawn as if by command
into a march along the Champs Elysees ending at the nation's
cherished shrine of liberty.
There were estimates that theq
Paris crowd reached nearly a half
million. ChileCuba
Outside the church, more than

-Associated Press
YVONNE CHARLOTTE DE GAULLE, widow of Charles de Gaulle,
and her son, Philippe, attend the general's funeral.

s
__ ,

VOTE UPCOMING:

30,000 pressed into the streets be-
hind steel barriers and lined the
routes that took the leaders to
and from the cathedral.
Between .10,000 and 15,000 po-
licemen had been mobilized to deal
with the massive security prob-
lems. A truck near the church
marked "electrical repairs" had a
stock of police submachine guns
inside it.
Bells tolled throughout France
as the Notre Dame service began
at 11 a.m. and then again at 3
p.m., when 50,000 church steep-
les around the nation slowly toll-
ed. That was the hour of the
Colombey service.
It was declared a national day
of mourning. Banks and niost
shops remained open but govern-
ment employes had the day off.
Both church services were
broadcast to the nation and to 25
other countries, including the
United States.
The burial procession began at
De Gaulle's country manor, La
Boisserie, and moved slowly down
Gen. de Gaulle Street past cot-
tages and barnyards and weeping
people.
In 58 minutes the ceremony was
over. The young pallbearers car-
ried the coffin past a military
guard of honor to the graveyard,
which has room for 40 tombs.
President Georges Pompidou
was not in Colombey in accord
with De Gaulle's wish that' no
government official be there.

renew.iles
SANTIAGO, Chile (MP)-Chile's
new leftist government estab-
lished diplomatic relations yes-
terday with Cuba, breaking the
South American boycott of the
Fidel Castro Communist regime.
Marxist President Salvador
Allende, a friend and admirer of
Castro, made the announcement
in a six-minute address on ra-
dio and television.
Chile severed relations with
the Castro government m o r e
than six years. ago as did all
other Latin and-. North Ameri-
can countries except Mexico and
Canada.
Allende said the action was
part of a policy of "free deter-
mination of peoples" and was
implemented with power grant-
ed him by Chile's constitution.
Allende, the first popularly
elected Marxist president in the
Western Hemisphere, took of-
fice Nov. 3. Since his election,
Allende has stated he would es-
tablish relations with Commun-
ist countries including China,
North Korea, North Vietnam
and East Germany - in addi-
tion to Cuba - "when it is
convenient for Chile."
Chile broke relations with
Cuba on Aug. 11, 1964 follow-
ing a resolution taken by the
Organization of American States.

Try the food.
It's excellent.

U.S. renews drive to
block Peking UNseat
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (A') - The United States yesterday ap-
pealed to the U.N. General Assembly to stand firm against expelling
Nationalist China and giving its seat to Communist China.
U.S. Ambassador Christopher Phillips said it would be unwise and
unjust to make the price of seating Communist China the expulsion
of the Chinese Nationalists.
It was a mild speech, and appeared aimed at stemming the grow-
ing support in the U.N. for opening the door at long last to the Chi-
nese Communists. Italy, Canada and Equatorial Guinea have all re-
cently recognized Peking.
Most diplomats expected the assembly would again reject the

211 N. Main

663-7758

serving dinner until 2 a.m.

{

"Prokofieff and Pop
THE HEBRAIC ARTS E
IN A
CONCERT OF MI
BLOCK, BRUCH, PROKOFIEFF, HAYD
on SAT. EVE., NOV. 14,c
at HILLEL-1429

The group says that violence on programs after 9 p.m.. when usual prop-Peking resolution call-,;
adults are viewers, will not be affected by the case. ing for admission of the Com-
munists and expelling the Nation-
alists. But they conceded Peking
would get more votes than last
year, perhaps even a simple ma-
ll~ jority.a
corn Phillips urged t h e 127-nation
assembly to decide once more that
(WELL ALMOST. . .) .the China representation issue was
an important question requiring
qN= EMBLE aw-tIhrds majority.
In contrast to U.S. speeches of
past years denouncing the Chi-
nese Communists, Phillips assert-
SC ed the United States was con-
stantly seeking an easing of rela-
d dBtions with Peking.
Last year the assembly approv-
at 8:00 P.M. ed as usual the U.S. request that:
a two-thirds majority be required,:
but the safeguard was not needed.:
btHill Ste
The vote was 56 to 48 against the
expulsion - admission resolution.
F_ RE / Twen tyone abstained.
-F-E- - -

DESEGREGATION DISPUTED
Nixon, NISA differ on schools*

WASHINGTON (R) --The
Nixon administration and the
National Education Association
(NEA) yesterday took sharply
divergent views as to the pro-
gress of school desegregation in
the South.
One high administration of-
ficial closely associated with
civil rights enforcement, s a i d
school desegregation in the
South is sufficiently complete to
shift government enforcement
officers from that area to the
North.
His comments came in the

face of charges by civil rights
groups that President Nixon
does not intend to press the is-
sue of in-school discrimination
in the South.
The NEA said a task force
study of 70 school districts in
Mississippi and Louisiana "cast
serious doubt on the supposed
progress made in deep South
school desegregation in the past
year."
The NEA report cited the in-
creasing trend toward private
schools to be a "most serious
threat to public education" in

the two states. It noted, that
of 421 private schools in Louis-
iana, only 32 have been accred-
ited by the Southern Associa-
tion of Colleges and Schools.
While the report dealt only
with Louisiana and Mississippi,
it said the task force members
"h a v e sufficient familiarity
with the desegregation process
in other states to conclude that
t h e desperately serious prob-
lems they have encountered
during this two-week survey are
by no means unique to Louis-
iana and Mississippi.

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