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November 10, 1970 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-10

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Page Seven

iw Tuesday, November 10, 1 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November 10, 19Th THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

i

Lack

of

mistakes

keys

M'

victory

on this and that
Where basketball
isn't -fun
eric Siegel

DETROIT
TWENTY-FIVE University of Detroit basketball players went
on the court at the Memorial Building for the first time in a
week yesterday, but no one was rejoicing, or even smiling, over
their return.
Not athletic director Bob Calihan, not Coach Jim Harding,
and, most of all, not the players.
There was none of the open hostility that characterized
the situation here last week, when the players-16 varsity
members and nine freshmen-presented a list of grievances
and announced they would not play for Harding, and when
Harding refuted the grievances and said the players were
"a pack of liars."
There was no open hostility . . . but there was still an
overriding sense of gloom. There was the feeling, listening to
Harding and watching the Titans practice for the first time in
seven days, that, despite the return of the players, all is not
well at the U of D.
An immediate concern is, of course, the effect of the events
of the past week on the performance of the team.
Harding, looking drawn and a bit haggard, spoke to that
question yesterday after meeting with his players for over
an hour. "I really can't answer that," he told reporters.
"We hope it won't adversely affect the season. It might
even help to unify the team. It all depends ..."
There is more than a little concern here, though, as to
whether a group of players who charged their coach with
a "failure to recognize us as human beings with human feel-
ings" can give the kind of effort it takes to win basketball
games.
"I guess the players returned because they wanted to play
basketball," Harding said in response to a question, but the
answer is not quite that simple. For the 25 U of D players, play-
ing basketball also meant a $3175 scholarship, and there was a
strong indication that that money would be taken away if the
players did not return.
Harding indicated yesterday that he wouldn't discipline the
players for their practice boycott and their charges that he
used "insulting language" and physically abused them. But he
said he wasn't going to change his ways, either.
"After 41 years, I'm not going to start doing anything dif-
ferently now," he said.
Harding has been doing things his way for a long time.
But his way-the way he says he won't change--has been
anything but sportsmanlike.
Before taking over as head coach at Detroit last year,
he had four coaching jobs, and he had some sort of trouble
at three of them.
He/ led Loyola of New Orleans and Gannon College to the
best records in the schools' history, but he was accused of getting
Loyola into trouble with the NCAA, and he was accused of
using ineligible players a Gannon. He had the Minnesota Pipers
of the ABA in first place, but he ended his pro choaching
career by punching Pipers' owner Babe Rubin.
Last year, captain Sam Dunlap quit the team after a
run-in of sorts with Harding. Dunlap's grandfather had
died, and Dunlap asked Harding if he could miss practice to
attend the funeral.
"Yes," said Harding ,"but if you miss practice, you'll
be punished."
"I'm not going to be punished for going to a funeral,"
Dunlap answered. And he quit.
Last week, the players charged that Harding treated one
player callously on a day when the player was feeling badly over
the death of a friend; that Harding used abusive language to
another player in front of the player's parents; and that one
of Harding's assistant coaches pushed a player during a practice.
Harding has categorically denied all the charges, but one
suspects that there is at least some element of truth to them.
If not, why did 25 players who came to play basketball walk
off the court?
The events here this past week brought the school
dangerously close to a breakdown of its basketball pro-
gram, and its entire athletic program..
It would have been nothing the athletic department didn't
deserve. In an effort to build a basketball powerhouse, the
school brought in a coach with a reputation for not getting
along with other people. At the same time, it overlooked Will
Robinson, a popular black coach in the Detroit area.
Now, at least for the meantime, it appears that basketball
has been saved at the University of Detroit. It may not be a
bad season, it may even be a winning season, but it will not
be a happy season.
That, too, will be nothing. When told his players didn't
look too happy when they came out on the floor yesterday,
Harding said glumly: "We never come out on the floor that
way~"

By MORT NOVECK
For a coach who's team has an
8-0 record and has yet to have
serious trouble with an opponent,
Michigan football mentor Bo
Schembechler is unusually quick
to point up flaws in his squad's
performance.
However even the eternal pes-
simist Schembechler had trouble
finding fault with the Wolverine's
42-0 erasing of the Illinois Illini.
Even he admitted that, "we played
well." In fact, Schembechler was
hard pressed to find specific mis-
takes in the Michigan game.
All he finally came up with were
Baily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BETSY MAHON

Manning may be able to play;
Kern named scholar-athlete
By The Associated Press
0 MEMPHIS - Quarterback Archie Manning who suffered a
broken arm Saturday may be back on the practice field tossing.passes
within ten days, doctors said yesterday.
The encouraging announcement followed nearly two hours of
surgery on the Mississippi star's left arm which was broken: below
the elbow. He is right handed.
Early statements on the, break indicated that Manning might
be wearing a cast for three months, thus preventing him from
playing again this season.
However, doctors said after the surgery that the game signal
caller might be able to return to the gridiron. late in the season.
r
0 NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. Quarterbacks Rex Kern, of Ohio
State and Dennis Dummit of UCLA were among 12 college seniors
selected yesterday by the National Football Foundation as 1970
Scholar-Athlete Award winners. .
Halfback David Elmendorf of Texas A&iM, defensive backs James
Cooeh of Colorado and Willie Clyde Bogan of Dartmouth, linebacker
Bill Zapalac of Texas, tackle Thomas Neville of Yale, guards Larry
DiNardo, of Notre Dame and Don Denbo of Tennessee a nd centers
John Sande of Stanford, Thomas Lyons of Georgia and Leo Dillon of
Dayton also were cited for excellence in the classroom as well as
on the playing field.
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Professional League Standings

three; the 61 yard pass play from
Illini quarterback Mike Wells to
tight end Doug Dieken, a thirteen
yard draw play by Willy Osley,
which was Illinois' longest run of
the day, and finally, the fact
that no Wolverines broke away
for long gains.
It wasn't so many games ago
that Schembechler had no time
for worrying about such things.
Earlier in the season Michigan
was displaying a marked propen-
sity for giving the ball away on
fumbles and interceptions. Last
year the squad gave up the ball
on turnovers only 14 times. In the
first seven games this year they
lost it on 17 occasions, 12 of them
fumbles. While they capitalized on!
opponents errors 42 times last
year, the Wolverines snatched the
ball only 24 times through the
first seven games in thecurrent
season.
However, if the Illinois game!
is any indication, the malady

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East Division
W L T Pct. Pts.
Baltimore 7 1 0 .872 '182
Miami 4 4, 0 .500 124
Buffalo, 3 5 4 .375 137
Boston 1 7 0 .125 177 ;
N.Y. Jets 1 7 0 125 144
Central Division
Cleveland 4 4 0 .500 189
Pittsburgh 4 4 0 .500 112
Houston . 2 5 1 .286 112
Cincinnati 2 6 0 .250 146
West Division
Oakland' 4 2 2 .667 201 :
Kansas City 4 3 1 .571 174 ]
Denver 4 4 0 .500 152
San Diego 3 3 2 .500 173 ]]]
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East Division

-Daily-Sara Krulwich
FRANK GUSICH (14), Michigan "wolf" zeroes in on Illinois quarterback Mike Wells (12) in last
Saturday's contest. Gusich was named defensive champion of the week for his performance in the
game, which was highlighted by strong open field tackles such as the one he made on this play.

seems to have been cured. As start passing more," Schembechleri
Schembechler was quick to point noted. "it's not that much of a
out immediately following the gamble anymore. Either the pass
game, Michigan. got through the will be completed, or it will go
contest with no miscues. incomplete, but it won't be inter-
This fact pleases Schembechler,' cepted."
who noted, "It's encouraging to Thus far in the season the
me that we didn't make mistakes." rushing game has for outweightedI
Especially gratifying to Schem- the passing attack. Of the 644
bechler was that none of quarter-
back Don Moorhead's passes were total plays that the Wolverines
intercepted and that all except one have run, 489 of them were on the
were right on target. "We may! ground. The team has gained 30141

OP
119
157
190
201
188
180
118
170
103
172
159
143
171
130
136
147
140
203
66
181
181
171

West Division
San Francisco 6 1 1 .857 202
Los Angeles 5 2 1 .714 170
Atlanta 3 4 1 A29 1;15
New Orleans 2 5 1 .286 104
Sunday's Results
Atlanta 10, Los Angeles 10, tie'
St. Louis 31, Boston 0
Cincinnati 43, Buffalo 14
Oakland 23, Cleveland 20
New York Giants 23, Dallas 20
San Diego 24, Denver 21
New Orleans 19, Detroit 17
Kansas City 24, Houston 9
Philadelphia 24, Miami 17
Minnesota 19, Washington 10
Pittsburgh 21, New York Jets 17
San Francisco 37, Chicago 16
:Yesterday's Game
{ Baltimore 13, Green Bay 10\

134
173

'
Ij
J
j
1
r
I
I
4

yards, but only 1011 have come
through the air.
Since Schembechler doesn't con-
sider passing a gamble anymore
he has found other ways to take
chances. Earlier in the season he
was booed when he punted on
fourth down and short yardage.
Against Illinois he went for the
first down twice though the ball
was between the 40 yard lines.
"I figured that we were going
to move the ball on Illinois,"
Schembechler commented. "I've
gotta cut that stuff out though,
I should have kicked."
With a near perfect perform-
ance from the team, Schembechler
must have had a hard time pick-
ing his champions of the week,
but rising to the challenge, he
selected Moorhead on offense and
Frank Gusich on defense.

St. Louis 5 2 0 .750
N.Y. Giants 5 3 0 .625
Dallas 5 3 0 .625
Washington 4 4 0 .500
Philadelphia 1 7 0 .125
Central Division
Minnesota 7 1 0 .875
Detroit 5 3 0 .625
Green Bay 4 4 0 .500
Chicago 3 5 0 .375

211
162
146
167
145
203
207
139
114

Titan cagers return to practice;
twJo payer rSemain suspended

7

The
CHARCOAL
HOUSE
between, about, above
beyond
Mr. Mini's and PJs
TRY US
338 S. State--7:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
i

i
i
I
I

CREDIT BY
EXAMINATION
FOR ENGLISH"
COURSES
Exeminations
/o be given
Nov. 20th and 21st
SEE
Professor Mullin
TO REGISTER
444 Mason Hall
Deadline Nov. 12th

1 ,

By PAT ATKINS
Special To The Daily
DETROIT - Mass suspension
of the entire University Detroit
basketball team ended late yes-
terday afternoon when the Titan
squad showed up at Detroit Memo-
rial Building for practice follow-
ing a closed meeting with Coach
Jim Harding.
Harding, who met with his team
for over an hour, would not di-
vulge the contents of the meeting.
"It's a team matter, what we dis-
cussed," Harding said. "We did
have some problems, but I ex-
plained that U-D is bigger than we
are individually or collectively. We
'have a better understanding of
what the problems were. I see no
problem now."
' The players themselves did not
issue a statement. Harding ex-
plained that at the meeting,'
"Everyone had the opportunity to
talk. Hopefully we'll have no need
for more meetings."
The 25 players were suspended'
last Thursday evening by Harding
after they released a list of griev-
ances, including the charge that
Harding's "failure to recognize us!
as human beings with human feel-
ings, wants and desires has driven
us to the point of psychological
depression."
The list of six grievances sub-
mitted by the players were that
Harding and his coaches used de-
ceptive recruiting practices, had

little regard for injured players,.
physically abused the ball players,|
had no faith in the players' ability
to adjust to college, had no regard
for a player's personal feelings,
and used insulting language.
On Friday, the suspended play-'
ers were ordered by Harding to
appear at yesterday's ractice or
be thrown off the te m. None
made the latter choice.
"The players want to play bas-j
ketball," Harding said simply. "I
gather they're happy."
Two players remain under sus-
pension for actions unrelated to
the past week's walk-out - Dan
Agee, for missing a practice, andl
Gerald Smith, for disciplinary rea-!
sons. Hardinng expects them to
return to the team soon.
A handful of U-D students hadl
waited on the sidelines to enterl
practice in the event that the var-
sity and freshman squads did not.
appear. Harding issued a call last!
Saturday to the entire male U-D
student body for an open practice
yesterday. The invitation was al-
so extended to the then-suspended
team.

University administrators, alum-
ni. and Athletic Director Bob Cali-
han worked as mediators in an
effort to bring the two sides to-
gether. "We held several meetings
and set up conversations," Calihan
explained after the start of prac-
tice. "We suggested the open prac-
tice. Then the players came todayj
and said they wanted a meeting
with Coach Harding before prac-
tice."
Harding backed by Father Mal-
colm Carron, S.J., the university
president, has taken a solid stance
towards his squad's rebellion.
After the closed session, he
made it plain that his attitude
had not changed. "No concessions
were asked for and no concessions
were given. They didn't ask for
any concessions at all and, of
course, I didn't give them any,"
Harding stated.
"It's been blown all out of pro-
portion as to what I really meant
by my statements," Harding noted.
"Hopefully we'll run things just
the same," Harding said. "If I
couldn't take the players back
without being vindictive, there
wouldn't be a basketball season."

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