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November 10, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-10

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71

Wednesday & Thursday

November 11th & 12th

page three

1 Cl4P

Sfrtitn

Ar

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
presents
DYLAN by Sydney Michaels
AND
CHARLIE by Slawomir Mrozek
ARENA THEATRE, Frieze Building
Promptly at 4.:10 p.m. or earlier if theatre is filled!
ADMISSION FREE

Tuesday, November 10, 1970 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN Page Three

y briefs
n e - W-S-By The Associated Press

Supreme Court
denies hearing

pow "amomed

I

Jewish Brothers and Sisters!

WHAT WAS
LIKE? WHAT

AUSCHWITZ REALLY
DOES IT MEAN TO US?

"NIGHT AND FOG"
A MOVIE AND DISCUSSION'
THURS., NOV. 12-8 P.M.
SHALOM HOUSE-1429 Hill St.

THE PROJECT COMMUNITY
PRESENTS
A Children's Film Festival
EVERY SATURDAY
Starting November 7th through December 19th
at CANTERBURY HOUSE-330 Maynard St.
From 10 A.M. to 12 Noon
FREE REFRESHMENTS AT INTERMISSION
Admission at the Door: 50c Little People, $1 Big People
Series Tickets (7 weeks): $3.00 Little People, $6.00 Big People
Tickets on Sale at The Project Community Office
2547 Student Activities Bldg.
or call 763-3548 for further information
FILM SCHEDULE
NOV. 7 (FROM FANTASIA) A WORLD IS BORN
GULLIVER'S TRAVELS
MOONBIRD

FROGS IN MALAYSIA of four different varieties and num-
bering over 3,000 fought a furious battle lasting more than six
hours, local newsmen reported Sunday.
The frog war took place in a swamp valley beside a Hindu
temple at a rubber estate near Sungai Siput, 100 miles north of Kuala
Lumpur, newsmen continued.
At first, only about 50 frogs were involved. But soon the num-
bers swelled, newsmen reported, and about 1,000 people assembled
to watch the frogs bite and tear at each other. Many were dead
at the end of the battle.
Maria Soosay, 30, who has lived for years near the area, said the
war is almost an annual event.
Other frog wars have been reported at various times in different,
parts of West Malaysia. No one has so far come forward with any
theory why such battles take place.
PHILIPPINE ELECTION VIOLENCE became evident yester-
day when two men were reported slain preceeding today's balloting
for 320 delegates to a constitutional convention.
, The Philippine News Service reported that a town councilor
and a relative of one of the candidates were shot to death in Ilocos Sur
Province, a region noted for its political turbulence. The town mayor
was also injured-in the incident, the news service added.
One of the major concerns of election officials is a number
of "private armies" they fear will be used to terrorize voters during
today's balloting.
JORDAN-PALESTINE PEACE AGREEMENT was implement-
ed on schedule in Amman and Orbid yesterday, the Arab truce
supervision force announced.
Col. Abdul Latif Abu Dahab, the second in command of the
force, said all troops in the two towns have been withdrawn. The
situation was calm throughout the country and no incidents have
been reported for the past three days, the colonel added.
Under the agreement, which ended the 11-day civil war inI
Jordan the army and the guerrillas were required to withdraw from
all Jordan towns by noon today.
AN IRANIAN AIRLINER was seized in stormy weather over
the Persian Gulf yesterday by nine men, six of whom are described
as criminals being expelled from an Arabian shiekdom.
Thirteen other persons aboard the plane - including two
guards and five crew members - were allowed to fly on to Iran, the
plane's original destination, three hours after his had landed in
plane's original destination, three hours after it had landed in
* * *

By The Associated Press
The Supreme Court voted yesterday not to rule directly
on the Massachusetts legislative move declaring the Vietnam
war illegal.
State officials had asked the court to rule without the
controversial legislation being tested in lower courts first.
Six justices voted against the state and three justices
dissented. Only Justice William O. Douglas, one of the dis-

on anti-war

-Associated Press
THE FAMED Civil War locomotive, "The General," will now go
to Kennesaw, Georgia rather than Chattanooga, Tennessee on
the basis of a Supreme Court decision yesterday. The dispute of
ownership my be the first that the court has settled with a loco-
motive as prize.
BOARD REPORT:
B1 tg pay rises asked
for rail road workerg

senters, set forth his views.
Massachusetts had argued that
without a declaration of war the
President has no authority to send
American troops into combat in
Southeast Asia.
The Nixon administration coun-
seled the court against granting
the state a hearing. Justice De-
partment officials said a judicial
inquiry into the legality of the
war would hamstring the Presi-
dent, insult Congress and em-
barrass the nation.
Voting against a hearing were
Chief Justice Warren E. Burger
and Justice Harry A. Blackmun,
both of whom were put on the
court by President Nixon and Jus-
tices Hugo L. Black, William J.
Brennan Jr., Byron R. White and
Thurgood Marshall, holdovers
from past administrations.
Dissenting with Douglas w e r e
Justices John M. Harlan and Pot-
ter Stewart.
Douglas, in a lengthy dissenting
opinion, rebutted point by point
the Justice Department's argu-
ment against hearing the case.
Sh"We have neverruled, I believe,
S that when the federal government
takes a person by the neck and
ry submits him to punishment, impri-
he sonment, taxation, or submission.
to to some ordeal, the complaining
c- person may not be heard in court,"
cy Douglas said.
"The rationale in cases such as
he the present is that the govern-
kement cannot take life, liberty, or
property of the individual and es-
cape adjudication by the courts
ge of the legality of the action," he
5 wrote.
to In the past the court has declin-
er ed every time to hear suits ques-
ve tioning the war's legality. At first,
nt only Douglas dissented. Subse-
5 quently, he was joined by Ste-
1, wart. Yesterday, the dissenters
1, picked up Harlan.

law

Court hears
arguments on
death penalty
WASHINGTON (P)-U.S. Soli-
citor General Erwin N. Griswold
advised the Supreme Court yes-
terday to leave to the people any
changes in the way the death pen-
alty is imposed in the United
States.
Speaking for the government at
a hearing, Griswold said changes
being urged on the court are not
required by the Constitution, are
impractical and could add to the
frequency of death sentences.
The former Harvard Law School
dean said he could understand a
desire to limit capital punishment.
But he said the court should be
guided by the separation-of-pow-
ers principle and leave the matter
of change to state legislatures.
"This is something that should
be done by the people," he said
toward the end of a solemn, three-
hour examination of two death-
penalty cases to which the fate of
more than 550 condemned men
and women is tied.
This was the third time the
court has heard pleas for stand-
ards to govern juries and for split-
ting off the sentencing phase from
the determination of guilt.
The court did not reach a? deci-
sion in the last two terms, leading
to speculation the justices are
closely divided.
Griswold stressed that only in
recent years have lawyers argued
that the Constitution requires jury
standards and bifurcated trials

NOV. 14
NOV.21
NOV. 28

RETURN TOIOZ
OUR GANG
THE TRUTH ABOUT MOTHER GOOSE
PROFESSOR VON DRAKE-POPULAR SONGS
DR. SYN ALIAS THE SCARECROW
THE GOLDEN FISH
STOP, LOOK AND LAUGH (3 STOOGES)
RED BALLOON

DEC. 5 ALICE IN WONDERLAND
UNICORN IN THE GARDEN
MR. MAGOO AS WILLIAM TELL
DEC. 12 ROBIN HOOD
SUZIE, THE BLUE COUPE
A COWBOY NEEDS A HORSE
WILLIE, THE OPERATIC WHALE
DEC. 19 ICABOD AND MR. TOAD
THE MOUSE ON THE MAYFLOWER

WASHINGTON (P) - Wage in-}
creases averaging $1.32 an hour, in'
a series of steps through 1972,
were recommended yesterday for
more than 500,000 railroad work-
ers by a presidential board seek-
ing to prevent a nationwide rail
strike fDec.10

THE SOVIET UNION yesterday released the Turkish colonel -
whose plane strayed into Russian territory with two U.S. generals The recommended wage settle-
Oct. 21. ment would bring wages 36 per
The Sovietsinformed the U.S. yesterday that the two Americans $368 e ve the pr sent prabl
will also be released but no date was given immediately for the be the biggest money settlement
handover. in the industry's history.
NEW METHODS
Bssi
Beggars gain sophistication

HAVE A 'NEW'

WARDROBE FOR THE
COST OF CLEANING

..woo%

NEW YORK (MP)-For the panhandlers of New
York City, the days of "Can you spare a dime for
a cup of coffee?" are long gone.
As in any modern American business, pan-
handling has come up with a new bag of gimmicks
to increase productivity.
A man, wearing a neat business suit and car-
rying a slick valise, comes up to you in the Port
Authority bus terminal near Times Square.
"Hey buddy," he says. "Help me out, huh?
Lost my wallet somewhere and haven't got enough
change to get home to New Jersey. Need 40 cents."
Another man, observed recently on a Man-
hattan street corner, has come up with a more
elaborate and probably more profitable version of
the same game. He held a fist-full of cash and

jazz trumpeter Miles Davis. A tall, thuin young man
wearing hippie-garb and long hair wandered
through the large crowd waiting outside Madison
Square Garden saying, "How 'bout some change
so I can see Miles. Gotta see Miles."
Begging is against the law. In New York it
is illegal for persons to loiter for the purpose of
begging or soliciting. The maximum penalty is
$250. Few beggars, however, are ever arrested.
Most citizens don't bother turning in complaints.
Down on the Bowery, an area of the city
famous for its derelicts, things are, in a sense,
more refreshing. At least there is little fakery.
A stranger walking past the darkened build-
ings of the Bowery one night was approached by
a panhandler who crept from the shadows of his

The nation's railroad indust
and four AFL-CIO unions in tI
dispute have 30 days in whicht
consider and negotiate on the re(
ommendations of the emergen
board under federal labor law.
If there were no settlement, tl
earliest the unions could stril
would be 12:01 a.m. Dec. 10.
The board's recommended waE
increases would provide for a
per cent increaseretroactive1
last Jan. 1, another 32 cents pt
hour or 8.5 per cent retroactii
to last Nov. 1, another 4 per ce
April 1, 1971, and three more
per cent hikes effective on Oct.
1971, on April 1, 1972 and Oct.
1972.
The board, headed by Lewis B
Gill of Merion, Pa., was appointE
by President Nixon under the Rai
way Labor Act to halt an earli
strike threat.
In addition to wage increas
the board urged the railroad it
dustry and the unions to set i
a high level standing committ
headed by a neutral party to re
ommend long-range solutionsi
the industry's tangled labor-ma
Iagement relations.
Another recommendation is1
negotiate changes in "restricti'
work rules," with the aim of cu
ting the railroad industry's cost
Both Gill and Secretarys
Labor James D. Hodgson saids
a White House news conferen
that the proposal for a long-ran
railroad labor-industry study con
mittee could be a most significai
part of the report, and that bot
sides had accepted the idea.
Hodgson said that he viewE
the proposed neutral chairman
the joint rail labor-industry con
mittee as a "combination catalys
mentor, counselor and occasiona
ly a stern father."

M.
er
es,
n-
Up
ee
c-
in
n-
to.
ve
it-
ts.
of
at
ce
ge
n-
nt
th
ed
of
n-
st,
Ll-

44% of welfare women
trained, want to work

WASHINGTON (R) - More
than one-third of women re-
ceiving welfare are trained for
and willing to work, a new fed-
eral study indicated yesterday.
But it found they are kept from
jobs by such things as ill health,
young children and inadequate
day-care arrangements.
Perry Levinson, a researcher
for the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare, report-
ed an increase from 25.3 per
cent in 1961 to 44.5 per cent in
1968 of welfare mothers with
high employment potential be-
cause of -education or previous
job experience.
While four of every five of
these mothers would want a
steady job, 80 per cent could
not work because they had chil-
dren under age eight and lacked

d a y-c a r e facilities for the
youngsters, Levinson found.
Some 38 per cent of this high-
potential group also cited poor
general health, as an important
factor in their joblessness.
Nearly 40 per cent of the
women with high job potential
had four or more problems
blocking their wayrto full em-
ployment, Levinson found.
In addition to young children
and illness, these included need
to care for someone at home,
lack of confidence, feeling of
powerlessness, and mistrust of
others.
Eppley also found that the
proportion of welfare families
without fathers at home in-
,creased from two-thirds to
three-fourths.

Why buy all new outfits
\ when we can add new
life to your present ward-
robe?
Our expert Dry Cleaning
helps keep your clothes
fresh and new looking. So
try us soon. We'll be
happy to serve you.

stopped passersby saying: "Do me a favor, pal? abandoned doorway home to beg some change.
My car go towed away and I don't have enough "What do you need the money for?" asked the
cash to get it out of the police garage. All I need stranger.
is four more bucks and I'll have the $75 for the "I'm just a wino," the man said with a smile.
fine and the towing fee." The stranger, caught off balance by the stub-
Clever, huh? So clever, in fact, that this pan- ble-afced man's uncharacteristic straightforward-
handler and other industrious beggars may take ness, gave him 50 cents and asked: "What kind
in as much as $200 or more a week by simply ask- of wine?"
ing for spare change. The man chuckling, replied: "Port-white
One ploy was observed at a recent concert by port."
.. . . .... ................ . ......*.....r*. ...... rr. ...r ..... . .... ............... ... .. ....... ...... . a . :::.... . . . .........***........ : .:.::...... .
. ............ . r..**..........'............. w:" :"::. .v: ::::v:::l :Y:: n.......... .... . .. r........ . . . . . . . ..::.:.*................................... ..........................
SPECIAL---THIS WEEK ONLY---Tuesday-Saturday, Nov. 10-14
Sair Sha dug
Reg. $5.00
IOW$35
0w
607 south forest avenue.#r
make your appointment
early at 665-3601 Y
. .. .n.
The University of Michigan
School of Music ad Departmnent of Art
present
- PUCCINI'S OPERA
.. . .U .~~ WW~ ~ w r' W .... . W . U ~W .

T

OUR LOW REGULAR PRICES
ARE THE BEST IN TOWN

LADIES DRESS ...............$1.85 & up
MENS SUITS.. . .............$1.80
MENS PANTS................... $ .90
LADIES SLACKS .................$ .95
SWEATERS.................$ .85 & up
BLOUSES ................... $ .90 & up
SKIRTS .. .... ................$ .90
COME AND COMPARE

"'JOE' is not merely an extraordinary film; it is a
small artistic miracle. Only rarely in the turmoil of
human events does a work of such brutal directness
to the core truths of the conditions of life that no
matter what one's beliefs, there is no denying its
validity. 'JOE' is approached for sheer impact and
importance only by 'Z,''PATHS OF GLORY,' and the
final scenes of 'EASY RIDER.' No one conceiving
this film, a year ago, could have known how loudly
it would speak today. It is a one-in-a-million."
-Harlan Ellison, L.A. Free Press
HELD
OVER
>,ti vof course
" I~

I

I

For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
Farah
Wright

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