100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 03, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

k

WELCOME IACK STUDENTS!
Try Our Famous-Delicious
PIZZA and CHICKEN
---Introductory Offer--
FREE Beautiful MICHIGAN PEN with
Each Order of a Large or Medium Pizza
(While They Last)
THOPSONS PIZZA
211 E. ANN ST. (Next to Armory)
CALL 71-0001
FREE DELIVERY
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 4:30 P.M.-1 :30 A.M.

I
I

Sat. & Sun. Until 2:00 A.M.

Doors
Open
6:45 P.M.

A87-9 P
DIAL 8-6416

"A FRANIC
FUNNY

COMEDY

. S S
Wone is indeed made
weak with laughter."

at
ER
Id
and
om
*H

1r

By The Associated Press

CLASHES BETWEEN Jordan's regular troops and Pales-
tinian' guerrillas threatened yesterday to generate a heightened
crisis in the chronically tense Middle East.
At the same time United States sources said yesterday that the
U.S. has firm evidence of Egyptian violations of the Middle East
cease-fire agreement.
Iraq announced yesterday that its 12,000 troops in Jordan would
help the guerrillas if the Jordanian Army moved against the com-
mandos. This followed five days of clashes between the army and!
the guerrillas and an attempt Tuesday night on the life of King
Hussein.
The confirmation by Washington sources of evidence of
Egyptian cease-fire violations came after repeated Israeli charges
and Egyptian denials of any infractions. Israeli Defense Minister
Moshe Dayan has reportedly threatened to quit his post if Israel
takes no action on the alleged infractions.
* * *
VICE PRESIDENT Spiro Agnew said yester4ay that the real
advocates of peace "are those who respect the rights of others,
not those who infringe on those rights; those who seek accomo-
dation, not confrontation."
Speaking at the American Legion Convention in Portland, Ore.
Agnew said that when faced with the choice, the American people
will "choose the policemen's truncheon over the anarchists' bomb, but
true peace lies neither in bomb or truncheon. It lies in that pattern
of mutual respect and forbearance that is the essence of civilized
society."
He added that the constitutional guarantee of free speech and
assembly does not cover "smashing windows, burning offices, assault-
ing people in the streets."
While the Vice President spoke, an estimated 300 youths circled
outside the convention hall chanting anti-war slogans. They were
part of the People's Army Jamboree, a group of war protestors who
had made two antiwar marches through central Portland earlier in
the convention.

UAW names
two firms . as
strike targets
DETROIT (RP) - The United Auto Work-
ers, after rejecting new contract offers
from the Big Three automakers, yesterday
named General Motors and Chrysler as
the target firms for a possible strike.
If agreement between the union and
the companies is not reached by Sept.
14, one or both of them will be struck.
UAW President Leonard Woodcock said
the union had decided to exempt Ford
Motor Co. from a strike threat because
"we want to have at least one firm pro-
ducing minicars to meet the competition
from the imports."
Woodcock said that either GM or Chrys-
ler, or both, would be struck at mid-
night Sept. 14 if an agreement is not
reached.
"We don't give a damn if we run
through the strike fund," Woodcock told
cheering representatives of Chrysler's UAW
rank and file earlier in the day. "We
can strike without money as we did in
the past."

page three

Z I P

'tr ri ttn

347 ''b'NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE:, 764-0554

-.

Thursday, September 3 1970

-Associated Press

L.A. HERALD EXAMIN

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

Gene
Wilder,
out of'
"The
Producers"

"'START THE
REVOLUTION
WITHOUT
ME"

Closing shop
Virginia Carson of Raleigh, N.C., tosses "Vote to End the War" buttons in
air as she and other workers of Project Pursestrings close their lobbying head
ters yesterday following the defeat in the Senate of the McGovern-H
amendment to end the war in Vietnam. Virginia now plans to join the cam
staffs of anti-war congressmen.-
McLUCAS TO APPEAL
Attorney for Panther w
seek to overturn uerdc

Donal
Sutherl
fresh fr
M*A*S

to the
dquar-

atfield However, one member of the union's in-
npaign ternational executive board, which made
the target decision, said he doubted the
union would strike Chrysler and GM' at
the same time.
The target decision was made after the
Ill GM, Ford and Chrysler councils v o t e d
overwhelmingly to reject the company of-
i fers made Tuesday.
The Big Three, who employ about 713,-
b 000 UAW workers in the United States
SI, and Canada, said their offers would raise
wages alone by 7.5 per cent .in the first
e appeal year and by 3 per cent in each of the last
U.S. Su- two years of a three-year contract. They
said is would cost them $2.3 billion over
ded kos- three years,
speech Woodcock said that if GM were struck,
rally ex- it would be a selective strike aimed at
he three cutting off GM's production by striking
the one assembly plants but leaving parts plants,
er seven which supply the other automakers, in
operation.

t

r
...

-

'

D
OP
1

77-

OORS
EN AT
2:45

Dial 5-6290

SHOWS AT
1, 3, 5,
7 &9 P.M.

"Finally we have a film that is of, instead of simply
about, youth.. .'The Strawberry Statement' is not but to
probe the big issues. It wants us to feel the bafflement,
joy and anguish of Simon as he gropes for maturity in a
world that would stagger the strongest. And this task it
achieves beautifully .. . a welcome presence of visual
and verbal wit (so rare in most 'youth' films) and a,
blessed absence of sex and drugs. The casting is well-
nigh flawless. Rock music is used for once with taste and
perception ... I was greatly moved by it, and I loved itl"
-RICHARD CHRISTIANSEN,
Chicago Daily News
THE
STRAWBERRY STATEMENT
AROCBEd CHARrO4M -EN CNKER
<:PROOUCTIONFRiOMnGM METROCOLM

TEACHER DISPUTES and money problems have delayed
_ school openings ii many areas of the country. Voters in several
cities have rejected proposed tax levy increases or school operat-
ing budgets.
An Associated Press survey shows that tens of thousands of
youngsters received extra vacation time in a number of states, in-
cluding Michigan, Illinois and Oregon.
In Michigan, teacher walkouts over pay and fringe benefits have
delayed school openings in 10 districts. The largest area affected was
Highland Park where teachers walked out in demand for higher
wages. Classes for the district's 11,900 students, including students at
Highland Park Community College, were to have started Monday.
Illinois school officials reported teachers' strikes delayed the
start of classes in at least seven districts. Schools in the largest struck
district, 22,000-pupil East St. Louis, wereto open yesterday but were
delayed by a strike of the area's 1,000 teachers. A spokesman for the
teachers said that the teachers demand higher salaries and larger
fringe benefits.
COMMUNIST TROOPS have advanced to within easy rock-
et and mortar range of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh,
but have not yet shelled the city.
The city is poorly defended, with only two battalions guarding
its highly vulnerable eastern flank.
Meanwhile in Paris, North Vietnamese Ambassador Xuan Thuy
said yesterday that there could be no cease fire in Vietnam until the
United states agrees to withdraw all of its troops from the country,
and replace the present Saigon government with a provisional coali-
tion. They said that a cease fire could exist only when "all the funda-
mental questions are agreed upon."
Thuy's announcement presumably came as a reply to fourteen:
senators who urged President Nixon Tuesday to propose a compre-
hensive standstill cease-fire for South Vietnam at the stalemated
peace talks in Paris.

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (P) - Attorneys for
Black Panther Lonnie McLucas are seek-
ing to overturn a jury's verdict that he
was guilty of conspiracy to murder in the
killing of a fellow Panther in May 1969.
Monday, within hours of the jury's find-
ing, the lawyers filed a motion to set it
aside. They indicated that they would file
an appeal when McLucas is sentenced la-
ter this month.
The jury's verdict came after six days
of deliberations - a total of 35 hours. The
jurors found McLucas innocent of three
other qharges - kidnaping resulting in
death, conspiracy to kidnap and binding
with criminal intent.
Conspiracy to murder carries a maxi-
mum of 15 years in prison.
McLucas' lawyers argued that the ver-
dict was "against the law and the evi-
dence."
The charges against McLucas stemmed
from the death of Alex Rackley, a' Black
Panther from New York City whose body
was found in a Connecticut swamp.
Seven other Panthers, including na-
tional chairman Bobby G. Seale, are await-
ing trial in the case.
The state charged that Rackley was kill-
ed as a police informer on orders f r o m
Panther leaders. McLucas said he partici-
pated in the slaying in fear of his own
safety., Seale denied on the stand that any
such order was given.
McLucas is the first of eight Panthers
to be tried as a result of the torture-death
of Rackley, a New York City Panther.
Theodore'Koskoff, McLucas's attorney,
told a crowd of about 200 onlookers and
demonstrators on the New Haven Green
outside the courthouse that he would ap-

peal the convictioni and pursue th
"all the way," referring to the 1
preme Court.
News of the jury's verdict prece
koff to the Green and touched off
es from demonstrators. They gene
pi'essed relief over acquittal on t
charges but spoke of the influence
conviction could have on the oth
defendants.

f,
Viii:
'
GC - -
,f
.S:
,;..
Yf
i:i,
{ :%;
.',. '
'
r
,c;
iS% I;;
t,
((t .i

Got Nothing To Do?
COME TO THE

CHI

PHI

ZIA

/": r
/i
lyA
> f
r 'y
}N
;r Na:
r;r
:,J
i
f
: l :F
yr +.i:r"
{
I1
QG.'ji r
} { f
i::ff'.

"' ;/

h. __________________________________________ -.--

95% of the Reading Population Reads Only 250 to
300 Words Per Minute or Less,

Rent your
Roommate with
a Classified Ad

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
,aged by students"at.the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan,' 420 Maynard" St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-,
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mall.
Summer" Session published, Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

FA

ST RAI

G

I

Join The Daily
Sports Staff

U

r
i

-Associated Press
Agnew speaks
Vice President Spiro Agnew waves amiably to the crowd of American Legion-
aires following a talk at their convention yesterday. Agnew is flanked by Legion
National Commander J. Milton Patrick.

LAWN DANCE
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER THIRD,
8-12, AT THE CORNER
OF HILL AND WASHTENAW
(5n Wnshtnnw

Is Not Difficult to Learn
Those who completed courses held this past year at the Bell Tower
Hotel achieved speeds of 800 to 2000 w.p.m., with the -same or
increased comprehension they had at their slower reading rates.

4th SMASH WEEK!
THIS
COTTON
DOESN'T SHRINK!'

SEE HOW EASILY YOU CAN:
--save hours, use your time more
efficiently
-learn to read 3 to 10 times faster
than you do now
-improve your comprehension and
increase your enjoyment of
reading material

4 r_
' ° o
.
a
-
.' - ,
, ,
. ._
"F

at a cost less than HALF that of other commercial
reading courses offered in this area!

I 1"M - 'U I 1.U XL'V.* E I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan