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November 04, 1970 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-04

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aPage Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday. November 4, 1974

Democrats

hold

Senate

majority,

chairmanships

>

'T.__. _ __

Hruska leads;
Mansfield,
re-elected
(Continued from Page 1)
and was projected as the winner in
that race.
However, the President also suf-
fered key losses, and several dis-
apointments. In California, for
example, incumbent Republican
Senator George Murhy was trail-
ing Democratic opponent John
Tunney Jr. by 60,000 votes in early
returns and was expected to lose.
In Illinois, Democrat Adlai Stev-
enson III defeated incumbent Sen.
Ralph T. Smith. Stevenson h a d
been the subject of a fierce law
and order campaign by the Nixon
administration.
In Indiana, one of the key Sen-
ate battlegrounds, tlYe race was
close between Rep. Richard Rou-
debush, a law-and-order cam-
paigner boosted by both Nixon and
Agnew, and Sen. Vance Hartke,
a Democrat who hammered at the
theme of inflation and unemploy-
ment. With 77 per cent of the vote
tallied Hartke was leading 721,133
to 714,699.
In Texas, arch' conservative
Ll'oyd Bentson won his bid for a
U.S. Senate seat by defeating Rep.
George Bush, for whom b o t h
Nixon and Agnew had campaigned
personally.
In Virginia, the Democrats lost
a seat when Former Democrat
Harry Byrd Jr. ran successfully
has an independent.
In Connecticut, Republican Lo-
well Weicker defeated Democrat
Joseph Duffey and Independent
Thomas Dodd. Weicker totalled
443,061 to Duffey's 362,398 and
Dodd's 261,554 with 99 per cent
of the votes in.
Liberal Democrat William Prox-
mire was re-elected to the Senate
in Wisconsin. With 56 per cent of
the vote in, Proxmire had 564,919
votes to former University of Wis-
consin basketball c o a c h John
Erickson's 227,383 votes.
Senate Republican Leader Hugh
Scott won another term in Penn-
sylvania. With 95 per cent of the
votes counted, Scott led5Democrat
William Sesler 1771,855 to %1,-
556,917'
Early in the evening Democrat
Frank B. Morrison was leading
Sen. Roman L. Hruska, a Repub-
lican who had been considered
safe for re-election in Nebraska.
However, with 42 per cent of the
vote at 1 a.m. it was Hruska was
leading 94,177 to 92,704.
Republican Sen. Winston Prouty
won re-election over Philip Hoff
in Vermont, where Democrats had
nursed upset hopes.
Democratic Sen. Pastore of
Rhode Island easily won a fourth
term over: a Roman Catholic
priest, ,the Rev. John McLaughlin,
the Republican candidate.
With '99 per cent of the votes
counted in Florida, Democrat
Lawton Chiles led William Cramer,
875,582 to 749,835. With 89 per
cent of the votes in, Democrat
Stuart Symington was leading
John Danforth, 569,065 to 516,630,
in Missouri.
With less complete totals, in-
cumbent Democrat Henry Jack-
son led Charles Elicker, 448.992 to
87,631, with 51 per cent of the
yotes in in Washington, while Sen-
ate Majority leader Mike Mans-
field had a substantial lead over
Republican Harold Wallace. With
29 per cent of the votes, Mansfield
led 49,255 to Wallace's 28,306.

DemsP
Returns at midnight showed the
Democrats with a net gain of six
statehouses in the 35 gubernatorial
races around the country. Figures,
showed eight new seats for the
Democrats and two new seats for
the Republicans.
In Ohio the scene of one of the
bitterest gubernatorial races, lib-
eral Democrat John Gilligan de-
feated Republican Roger Cloud.
Cloud was severely hurt by a
loan company scandal involving
himself and two other Republican
nominees.>
In New York, Gov. Nelson
Rockefeller won an unprecedent-
ed fourth term as he defeated
former Supreme Court Justice Ar-
thur Goldberg.
Rockefeller, who was heavily
favored to win, held close to Gold-
berg in Democratic New York City,
and posted substantial majorities
in the vote-rich Republican ter-
ritory upstate. NBC predicted a
54 per cent majority for Rocke-
feller.
In California, Gov. Ronald Rea-

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Senate results

Pet. units
Reporting Democrat

State

Alaska
Ariz.
Calif.
Conn.
Dela..
Fla.
Hawaii
Illi.
Ind.
Me.
Md.
Mass.
Mich.
Minn.
Miss.
Mo.
Mont.
Neb.
Nev.
N.J.
N. Mexico
N.Y.

2 Kay 111
17 Grossman 29,982
12 Tunney 434,075
Duffey
Dodd * (x)
Zimmerman 31,125
Chiles
55 Heftel 42,329
Stevenson
89 Hartke (x) 756,125
Muskie (x)
Tydings (x)
31 Kennedy (x) 274,158
39 Hart (x) 787,765
43 Humphrey 421,526
Stennis (x)
85 Symington (x) 542,184
Mansfield (x)
55 Morrison 117,299
Cannon (x)
90 Williams Jr. (x) 1,069,698
Nontoya (x)
79 Ottinger 1,118,802
Buckley **,1,817,156
Burdick (x)
70 Metzenbaum 1,027,523
91 Sesler 1,495,572
91 Pastore (x) 210,680
Gore (x)
Bentsen
Moss (x)
92 Hoff 52,666
Rawlings
Byrd * (x)
Jackosn (x)
Rv .'

Republican
Stevens (x) 1821
Fannin (x) 31,189
Murphy (x) 337,810
Weicker Jr.
Roth Jr. 37,964
Cramer
Fong (x) 47,203
Smith (x)
Roudebush 751,827
Bishop
Beall
Spaulding 142,408
Romney 468,760
MacGregor 289,926
No candidate
Danforth 484,867
Wallace
Hruska (x) 120,817
Raggio
Gross 824,,718
Carter
Goodell (x) 1,069,698
Kleppe
Taft 1,071,823
'Scott (x) 1,693,373
McLaughlin 98,000
Brock
Bush
Burton
Prouty (x) 79,300
Garland

Dam bill
wins; city
bars add
By CARLA RAPOPORT
According to an unofficial tally
last night, local voters voted over-
whelmingly to bai the city from
annexing nearby sections of land
slated for residential development,
relinquishing control over the de-
velopment's planning.
The voters also approved a $3
million bond proposal which will
finance flood control facilities and
the repair of four Huron River
dams.
Under private contract, the res-
idential development project, plan-
ned to include 700 low-cost hous-
ing units, will remain out of the
city's jurisdiction.
If the proposal had passed, the
city would have been obligated to
provide sewer and water services
plus other city services.
Mayor Robert Harris had sup-
ported all annexation proposals,
while the City Council backed the
passage of two of the three.
Groups who opposed the three
proposals, including the Sierra
Club, a conservationist group, and
the League of Women Voters, said
they objected to any land annex-
ation until the city adopted theI

Dem hopefuls

N.D.
Ohio
Penn.
R.I.
Tenn.
Tex.
Utah
Vt.
Va.
Wash.
WX7 17-

Hubert Humphrey

for

1972,-

Elicker

{

W. V a. Byra (x) No candidate
Wis V Pr.xmire ()icksn e City Planning Commission's pro-
Wis. Proxmire X) Erickson posed master plan-a formula for
Wy. McGee (x) Wold coordinating construction through-
Heavy type indicates projected winner out the city.
EieavyThe sections of land affected by
(x)-Denotes incumbent the proposals are part of Pitts-
Independent field, Scio, and Ann Arbor town-
* Conservative ships.
Some low-cost housing in the
development, will be open to mar-
resu s ried students with fixed incomes,
eror rU which may take some pressure off
the tight campus housing market.
According to city Planning Di-
Pec. units rector Michael Prochaska, rents in
State Reporting Democrat Republican some of the low-cost units will be

Ala.
Alaska
Ariz.
Ark.
Calif.
Colo.
/Conn.
Fla.
Ga.
Hawaii
Idaho
Iowa
Kan.
Me.
Md.
Mass.
Mich.
Minn.
Neb.
Nevada
N.H.
N.M.
N.Y.
Ohio
Okla.
Ore.
Penn.
R.I.
S.C.
S.D.
Tenn.'
Tex.
Vt.
Wis.
Wy.

37
0
9
34
0
63
94
96
61
0
9
4
45
73
67
27
34
31
24
9
65
72
52
57
45
33
82
64
64
25
95
60
85
29
14

Wallace 289,165
Egan 0
Castro 15,546
Bumpers 81,133
Unruh 11,676
Hogan 218,833
Daddario 461 572
Askew 939,249
Carter 379,655
Burns (X) 172
Andrus 6,710
Fulton 215,841
Docking (x) 208,784
Curtis (x) 107,051
Mandel (x) 474,365
White 169,664,
Levin 569,682
Anderson 298,049
Exon 70,410
O'Callaghan 6,083
Crowley 35,761
King 113,328
Goldberg 1,278,243
Gilligan 985,187
Hall 151,232
Straub 61,847
Shapp 1,674,360
Licht (x) 102,491
West 146,455
Kneip 23,320
Hooker 494,462
Smith (x) 644,877
O'Brian 49,174
Lucey 305,161
Rooney 3,680

No candidate
Miller (xl 0

1

I

Williams (x)
Rockefeller (x)
Reagan (x)
Love (x)
Meskill
Kirk Jr. (x)
Suit1

11,917
38,455
15,499
260,712
540,131
717,285
241,277

proportional to tenants' incomes,
a§ part of a federal rent subsidy
program.
Under the flood control plan,
the city would borrow the $3 mil-
lion and then issue general obli-
gation bonds which will be repaid
directly from property taxes.
She dam rehabilitation, which
has been a city issue since
June, 1968 when a flood caused
considerable damage to three
dams and almost demolished the
fourth, will provide new gates,
foundations, walkways and other
repairs to the dams.
The dams to be rebuilt are
Arco, Barton, Geddes and Super-
ior Dams.

I
I
1

Suffrage at
18 losing
Continued from Page 1)
proposal may be strongly influ-
enced by the Detroit returns.
In the confusing language of
that proposal, a "Yes" vote would
mean blocking tax aid to parochial
schools, while a "No" vote means
continuation of the present pro-
gram, and possibly expanded ap-
propriations for private schools.
If the proposal passes, the Leg-
islature's $22, million program of
direct parochiaid would be auto-
matically vetoed. There is some
question about the fate of the
state's program of auxiliary serv-
ices to non-public schools, includ-
ing health services, remedial read-
ing and counseling the handi-
capped.
Those who favor the proposal
say the services would continue
if the proposition passed, but con-
tend that jarochiaid students
would have to go to a public
school building to obtain them,
O p p o n e n t s ,of the proposition
argue that the Camendment would
bar these services.
The dispute concerns the word-
ing of the proposal which would
"prohibit use of public funds to
aid any non-public elementary or
secondary school." Presently, 36
states provide some aid to. non-
public- schools.

By The Associated Press
Three possible candidates for
the 1972 Democratic presidential
nomination were returned yester-
day to the Senate by substantial
margins.
Sen. Edmund Muskie of Maine,
Sen. Edward Kennedy of Massa-
chusetts and former Vice Presi-
dent Hubert Humphrey of Minne-
sota won victories over their Re-
publican opponents with plurali-
ties indicating their strength as
potential presidential contenders.
Muskie took an early lead over
Republican challenger Neil Bishop
to win re-election in Maine. NBC
News projected last night he would
carry 65 per cent of the vote.
Muskie had aimed to better his
1966 record, when he was elected
to the Senate with 66.6 per cent
of the vote.
Muskie also hoped to pull into
office Gov. Kenneth Curtis, who
lost popularity a f t e r putting
through a state income tax. How-
ever, Curtis' re-election was still
uncertain last night.
Muskie became the election-eve
spokesman for his party as he
appeared Monday on nationwide
television. While President Nixon
spoke for the Republicans through
a tape of a speech he made in
Phoenix Saturday, Muskie repre-
sented the Democrats after they
scraped together enough money to
buy half the time the Republicans
originally purchased.
Muskie accused Nixon of lead-
ing, inspiring and guiding a po-
Wallace elected
'Ala. governor
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (t)-George
Wallace rolled. up a heavy majority
to win the Alabama governorship
last night, thus keeping the door
open for a possible third party
presidential attempt in 1972.
Both CBS and NBC predicted a
75 per cent majority for Wallace
early yesterday evening. He was
opposed by John Cashin of the
predominantly black National
Democratic Party of Alabama and
four other minor opponents. The
Republicans did not run a candi-
date.
Wallace barely won the Demo-
cratic nomination in the spring
primaries. He ran behind incum-
bent Gov. Albert Brewer in t h e
first May 5 primary, but rode a
white backlash .to victory in the
runoff primary four weeks later.
In the general election c a m-
paign Wallace urged a heavy
white vote to turn back the "black
challenge."

litical campaign built on what
Muskie called lies, slander, name-
calling and. "deception of almost
'unprecedented volume.."
He claimed Republican attacks
clouded real issues and prevented
the nation ifrom dealing with its
problems.
In Massachusetts, K e n n e d y
surged to re-election over his Re-
publican rival, Josiah Spaulding.
Through most 'of the early stages
of the tabulation of votes, Ken-
nedy polled'close to 67 per cent of
the votes with Spaulding trailing
far behind.
,ennedy's goal was to equal the
74.3 per cent he achieved in 1964,
when he was hospitalized through-
out the campaign due to an air-
plane accident.
His campaign aides said in ad-
vance they would consider a 60
per cent showing evidence that the
Chappaquiddick incident is be-
hind him, that his Massachusetts
Image is untarnished, Kennedy
renounced 1972 presidential am-

win big
bitions after the July 1969 auto-
mobile accident in which a oung
secretary drowned.
Conceding early that Kennedy
would ,probably win, the Republi-
can National Committee did not
contribute any funds to Spauld'
ing's campaign. 'Spaulding then i
had difficulty finding sufficient
financing, while Kennedy w a s
able to campaign extensively with
plenty of funds.
In a bid for a political come-
back after his defeat for th e
presidency in 1968, -,former Vie
President Hubert Humphrey was
elected to the Senate over Re-
publican Rep. Clark MacGregor.
Nixon lent his support to Mac-
Gregor, but NBC projected Hum-
phrey, a former senator, would
carry Minnesota by a margin o
55 per cent.
Looking ahead to 1972, sup-;
porters of Muskie, Kennedy and
Humphrey all felt last night that
their candidates' margins of vic-
tory were encouraging.

(Continued from Page 1)
pect our paths to cross again," he
said.
"I expect the final results to
show my victory percentage to be
55-60," said Bursley last night., "I
am very satisfied with the vote.
There has been a tremendous
amount of ticket-splitting, which
indicates thinking on the part of
voters."
Sallade could not.be reached for
'a statement last night.
Factors being blamed across the
state for the difficulty in count-
ing the votes are computer prob-
lems, a heavy voter turnout,
"sticker" campaign (equivalent to
write-in campaigns with paper
ballot voting), and the damp
weather, which authorities say, is
causing computer punch cards to
swell and stick.
Smit's and Koster's positions
varied sharply on most of the is,
sues in the campaign.
Koster opposed the present state
property tax, whereas Smit said
it should be reduced.
'The candidates both opposed
parochiaid and the state's abor-
tion law, considering abortion a
private matter.
Smit's victory over Koster wasJ
considerably greater than his vic-
tory over Sallade 'in 1968, which
was decided by less than 5,0001
votes.

Bursle Smit return
to State Legi's'lature

King 57
Samuelson (x) 7,728
Ray (x) 225,303
Frizzell 158,844
Erwin 106,771
Blair 259,223
Sargent (x) 199,509
Milliken (x) 685,359
Head 229,361
Tiemann (x) 51,068
Fike 6,555
Peterson (x) 48,041
Domenicki 107,344
Rockefeller (x) 1,555,936
Cloud 764,776
Bartlett (x) 170,394
McCall (x) 81,757
Broderick 1,287,871
DeSimons 102,104
Watson 125,874
Farrar (x) 19,124
Dunn 53,501
Eggers 578,673
Davis (x) 66,741
Olson 237,744
Hathaway (x) 6,664

Most Michigan Congressional
incumbents defeat challengers

(continued from Page I)
Republican opposer Patrick Dris-
coll of Roseville.
O'Hara carried 75 per cent of
the vote and it is possible that he
may be nominated for the position
of Speaker of the House following
the departure of the current
speaker, John McCormack.
-In a rather close race, Garryj
Brown, incumbent Republican rep-
resentative from the third con-
gressional district, was re-elected
despite a tough challenge from

Heavy type indicates projected winners
(x)-Denotes incumbent
GILLIGAN WINS IN OHIO

ost gubernatorial gains

.1

In Pennsylvania, imillionairet
Democrat Milton Shapp took the
statehouse from the Republicans
as he defeated Lt. Gov. Raymond
Broderick.
Shapp, a Philadelphia electron-
ics engineer who made his foitune
in the television cable business,
promised to recue the state from
approaching bankruptcy and a
$400 million deficit, even if it
meant a state income tax.
Broderick, a lawyer, campaign-
ed aggressively on a no-taxes pro-
gram, disagreeing strongly with

Republican

Gov. R a y-I

mond P. Shafer who proposed a
new broad-based levy two years
ago.
He also accused Shapp of dem-
onstrating in the streets during
the 1968 Democratic national con-
vention in Chicago-a bitter law-
and-order issue which Shapp call-
ed "a smear" and "a lie."
Democratic Gov. John West of
South Carolina beat his Republi-
can opponent U.S. Rep. Albert
Watson in a close race. Watson
had received extensive campaign
aid from Sen. Strom Thurmond
and had strong backing from the
Nixon administration. Vice Presi-
dent Agnew campaigned twice on
Watson's behalf.
The major issue of the South
Carolina campaign was court-or-
dered school desegregation and
outbreaks of violence between
blacks and whites. West is con-
sidered a moderate on these issues,
repeatedly saying that politics has
no place in the state school,
system.

town busing of pupils to racially
integrated schools. They divided
sharply, however, on the state of
the economy - in Tennessee and
nationally.
Dunn said President Nixon has
done a good job of moving against
inflation, that there have been
some "adjustments" in the econo-
my which, unfortunately, resulted
in m o r e unemployment, a n d
blamed failures of businesses in
which Hooker has an interest for
more unemployment in Tennessee
"than any other single factor."
Hooker, who helped found the
Minnie Pearl chicken chain and
Whale Inc., a conglomerate, said
financial troubles of those con-
cerns-as well as high unemploy-
ment in Tennessee and nation-
ally-are the results of unsound
policies by Washington Repub-
licans."r
In Connecticut, conservative
two-term congressman Thomas J.
Meskill ended 16 years of Demo-
cratic control on the state's guber-
natorial chair as he defeated Rep.

opponent Richard Enslen, a for-
mer Peace Corpsman.
Democrats had viewed Brown as
a weak candidate but they could
not succeed in cracking the hard
Republican core of support in the
Kalamazoo and Battle Creek
areas.
-Michigan AFL-CIO president
August Scholle was not able to
beat his opponent, incumbent Re-
publican William Broomfield of
Royal Oak.
Scholle was not able to attract
enough votes in the 18th congres-
sional district which includes the
wealthiest T- and traditionally
Republican - areas of Oakland
county.
-In the sixth congressional dis-
trict, Charles Chamberlain, the
Republican incumbent, defeated
John Cihon, an engineer. Chain-
berlain took the Lansing area, by
a 59 per cent margin.
-Charles Diggs, a Democratic
congressman since 1955, was re-
elected in the 13th district. Diggs,
who said that he would "continue
to seek peace and prosperity . .
in the liberal tradition," defeated
Fred Engel, a Republican pre-
cinct worker.
Results at a glance
1st District (1%)
X-John Conyers (D) 390
Howard L. Johnson (R) 22
2nd District (64%)
X-Marvin Esch (R) 69,184
Michael Stillwagon (D) 43,090
3rd District (55%)
X-Garry Brown (RI 47,929
Richard Enslen (D) 40,409
4th District (49%)
X-Edward Hutchinson (R) 49,878
David Mecormack (D) 31,574
5th District (71%)
X-Gerald Ford (R) 69,064
Jean McKee (D) 43,896
6th District (48%)
X-Charles Chamberlain (R) 44,688
John Cihon (D) 31,194

13th District (1%)
X-Charles Diggs (D) 238
Fred Engel (R) 32
14th District (13%)
X-Luclen Nedzi (D) 12,447.
John Owen (RI 15,877
15th District (58%)
X-William Ford (D) 59,489
Ernest Fackler 13,567
16th District (21%)
X-John Dingell (D) 31,745
William Rostron (R) 8,521
17th District
X-Martha Griffiths (D)
Thomas Klunzinger R)
18th District (44%)
X-William Broomfield (R) 60,601
August Scholle (D) 31,646
19th District (51%)
X-Jack McDonald (R) 49,170
Fred Harris (D) 36,209
X-indicates incumbent
Figure in parantheses following dis-
trict is per cent of precincts reporting
Returns are of 1- a.m.
Candidates in bold face are con-
sidered elected.

E
M
2
I
t
3
1
i
t
1
{
f
1
ft
l
,
,1

Gilbert Bursley
Voters elect
Kelley, Austin
Democrats Frank Kelley aff
Richard Austin held leads in the
state races for attorney general
and secretary of state last night.
With 25 per cent of the returns
in, Kelley appeared to have
a solid edge over Republican W
liam Farr. Kelley has been at-
torney general for the last nine
years, and was, expected to win
with a 4-1 margin when tallies
f r o m primarily Democratic
Wayne County were added to the
total later this morning.
Austin's lead over State Sen.
Emil Lockwood was also'expected
to be increased when W a y n e
County totals were added.'
With about 20 per cent of the
ballots counted, 'again entirely in
the outstate area, former Demo-
cratic Governors John Swainin
and G. Mennen Williams lead the
4-man non-partisan race for Su-
Dethmer was only a small margin
behind Williams, however.

WCC millage proposal winning

Ray Smit

Early returns on the 13 races
for Washtenaw County commis-
sioner seats indicated that the Re-
publicans would retain a majority
on the Board of Commissioners.
By midnight, with scattered
precincts from 10 out of the 13
districts r e p o r t i n g, Democrats
seemed to be winning only two of
the seats presently held by Re-
publicans.
Republicans were leading in
seven of the 10 races for which
figures were - available.
In the seventh district, which
includes the University and has
mostly student and faculty voters,
Republican incumbent Bent Niel-
son was trailing Democrat Ernest
Quenon, by a slim margin of 1,396

Democrats seemed assured of
holding their present seats in the
10th, 12th, and 13th districts, and
Democratic candidate Vanell Wil-
liams was leading incumbent Da-
vid Byrd in the fifth district by
891 to 761.
In the eighth district, Democrat
Nelson Meade was gaining on in-
cumbent R e p u bli can William
Lands, with Meads holding 1,060
votes to Lands' 1,085.
The one-mill tax increase for
Washtenaw Community College
will last five year and involved an
additional tax of $1 for each
$1,000 of assessed property value
in WCC's district, which includes
almost all of Washtenaw Countyj
Before the' election, a 1.25 rmills

X before a candidate's namen-
dicates incumbent,
1st District
X-BRADBURY (R),803
unopposed
2nd District
X-MAST (R) 2l09
Hunawinl (D) 779
3rd District
X-TAYLOR (R)
Wolf (D) 44
4th District
EVANS (D) 277
Ellis (R)269
5th District
X-Byrd (R) '76
WILLIAMS (D) 89
6th District
X-WALTERHOUSE (R)
Lee (D) 78
7th District
X-Neison (R) 139
QUENON (D) 154

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