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November 04, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-04

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, November 4, 1970

P_ eTTH IHGA AL

records

11 1. 1

1,200 rally in Detroit

Big Brother smooths 'to support auto
criI if jr DO/IiPd b1l A c

GAG ,I U tvJ2WI UNritv

A cohesive, group feeling
pervades Be A Brother (Colum-
bia 30222) by Big Brother and
the Holding Co. Still around is
James Gurley and Sam Andrew
switches off with Nick Grave-
nites for lead vocal. Among the
"friends" listed is Janis Joplin',
but she wails in noticeably only
for a few seconds on one cut.'
Brother brings back the Frisco
1968 sound, a little fuller and
with 'some rough, junky edges
smoothed off. There are no de-
perate attempts at innovation,
no super-star performance trips
and in this case the result is a
goodly amount of pleasing music
and a few mistakes.
"Keep On (Keeping On)" is
what the boys are about, doing
music .about. the scene, e.g.
"Heartache People," "Sunshine
Baby," "Mr. Natural," and "Be
a Brother (Be a Sister, Yes),."
During "Keep On" and most of
the goings on, you just feel good
to hear these guys who definite-
ly are here to do some playing.
A lilting country violin number
salutes the performer of "Okie
From Muskogee" with the
words: "You're a honky I know/
but Merle you .got soul/So I'll
change your. flat tire, Merle."
Andrew and Gravenites both
do honest, unencumbered vocals.
The group does plenty of good
guitars; "Home on the Strange"
is a spiffy be-bop rock instru-
mental along with some average
moments. "Heartache People"
complains about those mournful
souls laying out their bum trips
at 4 :15 in the morning; ;ittis
saved from insipidness with the
help of two fiddles, but is still
worth about four minutes .less
than the six and a half it is al-
loted. "Funkie Jim" drags on a
bit too. We'll give it anr83.
--Fargo Berman
A Zappin' cover
They split up, they reformed
on Mother's Day, who knows if
the Mothers will record again.
Their newest album, Weasels_
Rip My Flesh (Bizarre-Reprise),
features a conglomeration of
pieces recorded between 1967-
69,- both live and in the studio.
"It represents different aspects
of our work," according to the
jacket.
When the Mothers settle down
for incoherent numbers (there
are about three of them on the
album) they outclass almost any
other group today in originality
and pure musicianship.
They ruin it with satiric
grunting, screeching and laugh-
ing, which aren't particularly
inovative but very annoying.
Some of the tracks sound like
Coltrane, with a trumpet and

sax flirting with each other, or
honking saxes warbling all over
the scale.
On "Directly From My Heart
to You,"a fantastic electric vio-
lin spins over a traditional blues
bass line; it sounds like Eric
Clapton on a fiddle.Zappa's lead
guitar never sounds like a usual
lead guitar, but talks and says
something new.
Zappa has written an out-
standing song called "Oh No,"
in 7/4, which goes soaring over
the staff, and would make a
great title song for an off-
Broadway musical I wish Zappa
would write someday.
Perhaps the best part of the
album is the cover: a pop art
cartoon of a slick-haired, all-
white-teeth man holding an
plugged-in electric w e a s e 1, to
his face. It's ripping bloody
grooves in his cheeks and the
man is going RZZZZZZZ! Most
of Zappa's music is as bewilder-,
ing.
--Daniel Zwerdlingj
A Pyrrhic victory
In "No Shoestrings on Louise,"
Elton John tries to sound like
Jagger, in "Take Me To The
Pilot" he gets into a Joe Cocker
styling. For the most part Elton
John (UNI 73090) does contain
a sound unique to the singer and
pianist of the same name, but
it just ain't fine music. Some
guy named Bernie Taupin who
looks very hip among the hip
pictures on the album's back
cover has tried much too hard
on the lyrics which he wrote (he
apparently does not perform
musically) to be semi-esoterical-
ly heavy. Such as in "The Cage":
Well I pray while you bathe
in bad water
Sing songs that I learnt as a
boy
Then break all the bones in
my body
On the bars you can never
destroy.
Elton John sings with a stun-
ningly dualistic voice-a com-
bination of a plaintive, mature
sorrow with a childlike quality-
but he too tries too hard to be
resplendent. Like Lee Michaels
and Blood, Sweat, and Tears,
John has incredible capabilities
but they .are channeled into
an ultimately "manufactured"
sound and' not music.
The intros to several pieces
are gauche, blatantly meaning-
ful over-orchestration. There is
a lot of switching off of musi-
cians and a resulting blaring
studio quality despite the aim
of the effort to bring off an in-
tensely emotional effect.
--Fargo Berman

By MARK DILLEN
and ART LERNER
Special To The Daily
DETROIT - Drawn by a na-
tional call for a "worker-stu-
dent alliance," over 1,000 de-
monstrators rallied and march-
ed in support of striking auto
workers yesterday afternoon.
The disciplined,. chanting
crowd gathered on the Wayne
State University Mall for a rally
and then walked the mile route
to the General Motors Bldg.
which looms over the north end
of the WSU campus.
Throughout the day, which
was without incident, "student-
worker unity" was stressed as a
means of combating "GM boss-
es."
These "bosses" were blamed
for many of the nation's social
ills. Speeches and chants charg-
ed that GM's "capitalistic" pol-
icies are allegedly w a r -
oriented and racist. Numerous
banners demanded the nation
turn to socialism.
The crowd, which grew as it
moved toward the GM Bldg.,
was preceded by Detroit police
who detoured approaching traf-
fic. Tension mounted as t h e
crowd gathered outside the hea-
I vily guarded building and* in-
terrupted traffic on W. Grand
Blvd.
After two speakers addressed
the crowd, calling for a "fight-
ing worker-student alliance,"
,demonstration marshals direct-
Daily Official Bulletin
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4
Day Calendar
Natural Resources Lecture: Dr. A.
Carpenter, Library of Congress, "Per-
spectives on Environmental Policy -
View from the Top," 1040 Nat. Res.
Bldg. 3:10 p.m.
Statistics Seminar: Prof. R. Brown,
"Assessing the Accuracy of Estimates -
a Personalist Approach," 4205 Angell
Hall, 4 p.m.
Physics Colloquium: E. Taylor.
M.I.T. "A Strategy for Introductory
Quantum Physics," P&A polloq. Rm.,
4 pm. f
E duc a t i o n Lecture: Educational
Change Team, "Crisis, Conflict and
(Continued on Page 7)
0 $1.50.m

ed the throng back to the Wayne
campus.I
The marchers included con-
tingents from Georgia, Minne-
sota, Chicago, Cleveland a n d
New York, although most of the
demonstrators were from the
Detroit area.
At the rally preceding t h e
march, one radical said "we're
not the-mad bombers, and we've
got a lot more important stuff
to discuss than the Weather-
men," distinguishing between
the Weatherman faction- of
SDS and his own.
Naomi Parker, a Detroit wel-
fare mother, proclaimed, "if you
are black, white, green, blue or
even little purple people eaters
let's get together and get the
bosses."
As was the custom throughout
the day, her speech was follow-
ed by chants: "Same enemy,
same fight, workers and stu-
dents must unite."
Other speakers, representing
radical groups from across the
country, exhorted the crowd to
"Smash GM" and "Smash rac-
ism."
"Workers need good commun-
ist ideas," said Ken Stills repre-
senting the Canadian party of
labor. "A boss is a boss is a boss
is a boss," he said.
As the rally ended, the pro-
testers formed contingents ac-
cording to states. As the last

workers
speaker called for "some really
good chanting," the group fol-
lowed a Dodge stationwagon
equipped with a sound system
down Cass Ave.
Media personnel accompanied
the marchers along the route as
the protefters shouted to office
workers in the surrounding
buildings, "Elections are a pack
of lies, don't vote, organize."
Bomb threat
eloses UGHI
The Undergraduate Library
(UGLI) was shut down for
about an hour last night in re-
sponse to the sixth UGLI bomb
scare this week.
Rose Grace Faucher, head li-
brarian, ordered the closing af-
ter a caller told her t h a t a
bomb would go off at 6:15 p.m.
A search by Ann Arbor police
and Sanford Security guards re-
vealed no bomb, and the library
was reopened at 6:30 p.m.
Previous bomb threats! receiv-j
ed at the UGLI this week in-
clude three calls on Sunday and
two on Monday.
Faucher said last night that
if another bomb threat is re-
ceived t h e library would close
for the entire night.

CAN-CAN
is NOW
Th at 8
Fri. at 7 & 10
Sat. at 7 & 10
The Place to Meet
INTERESTING People
BACH 'CLUB
"Some Puzzles
About Music"
CARL COHEN
Assoc. Dir. of Res.
College & Assoc.
Prof of Philosophy
THURS., NOV. 5, 8 P.M.
S. QUAD W. LOUNGE
EVERYONE WELCOME
(no musical knowledge required)
DIAL 8-6416
Endina Wednesday

4

V

'(

THIS FRIDAY! NOV. 6!
T.G.i.

4 to 6 p.m.

RECORDS
COKES & DONUTS
SOFT TALK

'V
j

AT-
SHALOM HOUSE-1429 Hill St,

nf -_____ --__

"'JOE' is not merely an extraordinary film; it is a'
small artistic miracle. Only rarely in the turmoil of
human events does a work of such brutal directness
to the core truths of the conditions of life that no
matter what one's beliefs, there is no denying its
validity. 'JOE' is approached for sheer impact and
importance only by 'Z,' 'PATHS OF GLORY,' and the
final scenes of 'EASY RIDER.' No one conceiving
this film, a year ago, could have known how loudly
it would speak today. It is a one-in-a-million."
-Harlan Ellison, L.A. Free Press

A

HELD,
* OVER
of cours$
WED., THUR.-, 9
FRI.-7, 9, 11
SAI.-5, 7,9/11

4

- RADICAL FILM SERIES
PRESENTS
BENJAMIN CHRISTENSEN'S
WITCHCRAFT THROUGH THE AGES
TONIGHT
CANTERBURY HOUSE-330-Maynard

ingmar
bera-manls

Alch !!
3141ge
COLOR A CANNON FELEASE0 ®®''

F

O O FIFTH Por'UM
DOWNTOWN ANN AisSoo
LJJ INFORMA"ON 'T6'-700j

--Thursday-
"PERFORMANCE"

7, 9, 31 p.m.

admission 75c

I

THE PROJECT COMMUNITY
presents
Frederick Wiseman's documentary
""HIGH SCHOOL"
"When you are being addressed by someone older than you or
in a seat of authority, it's your job to respect and listen. We are
out to establish that you can be a man and that you can take
orders"
HIGH SCHOOL
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9th
ARCHITECTUREdAUDITORIUM
7:OPPM. and9:05P.M.
Contribution $1 .00
-- - - -- - -- - -- -- -- -
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT & SULLIVAN SOCIETY
P RES EN TS
the 'eeme e the "uav'd
OR
7 'e Jte$flppy aft and 11 Jtid'
NOVEMBER 11-14
Lydia-Menidelssohn Theatre
TIMES-8:00, Wednesday-Saturday
2:00, Saturday Matinee
TICKETS-$2.50, Evening Performance
$2.00, Saturday Matinee

Subscribe to'The Michigan Daily
.o. . a monument to the age."-John Ciardi

0

'U,

nikos kazontzakis
author of "zorba the greek"
THE ODYSSEY
A MODERN SEQUEL
Kimon Friar translation

at 8 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, November 4-7
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE-Box Office opens 12:30 764-5387
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
.,,'one of this century's major achievements."-Mary Renault

I

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a

Il

Joe
HNickerson
from the
FOLK
ARCHIVES
of the

EMU UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES BOARD presents
TRAFFIC
and
TEAGARDEN & VAN WINKLE
NOVEMBER 8-8:30 P.M.
at Bowen Fieldhouse-Ypsilanti, Mich.
TICKETS: $3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $4.50
AVAILABLE NOW at: Little Things, Ann Arbor
EMU, McKenny Union, Ypsilanti
Ned's Bookstore, Ypsilanti
J.L. Hudson, Detroit

I

#i

TICKETS ON SALE
Bursley Hall, November 5 & 6, 11:00-2:00, 4:30-7:30
Mendelssohn Box Office opens Sunday, November 8th
Box Office Telephone: 668-6300

Colege. ________

the Village Voice, 80 University Place, N. Y.

10003
Reg.-9f21170

LIBRARY of
CONGRESS

SINGLE SHOWS
NOW ON SALE!"
NIRS T ESIYO AW ARD P R SIA Y

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a-

TUES.-
TERRY
TATE
7 5c
NEXT WK.-

NY DRAMA CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD ri ~cIA
-w- I
EXCITING
177b tPLAYS
,. Mw. i~fa
"AN AVALANCHE 1970-71
N
"UIST MUSICAL TO RSEEN
.n t ll { 1 71 T 'PIDOUR ON THE ROOM'." '.,,.
y N.Y. t,.

ANN ARBOR BLACK THEATRE, Inc.
* PRESENTS
THREE
ONE-ACT PLAYS
"DAY OF ABSENCE"
by DOUGLAS TURNERWARD
T
"CONTRIBUTION"

4'

DAVID
BROMBFRG

by TED SHINE

+

WED.

"THE FIRST
MILITANT MINISTER"

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