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November 03, 1970 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-03

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Page Six
STUDENT ANALYSIS
I WBNNews
650
Presents
TOTAL COVERAGE
OF ELECTION '70
including
* Returns from all state & local races
*Returns of other important
Gubernatorial & Senatorial
electionsa
* Reports from all regional campaign
headquarters
80 P.M.
Until ALL Returns Are In
commentary & analysis:
Lou Glazer & Mark Goldsmith
anchor men:
Steve Steinberg & Bob Grimshaw
interviews: Ralph Bernstein

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November 3, 1970

Ex-pro charges widespread NFL drug use

NEW YORK (AP) - Dave Meg-
gysey, former linebacker for the
St. Louis Cardinals who quit pro
football because he claims it is
"dehumanizing," charged in Look
Magazine yesterday that "a lot of
NFL trainers do more dealing in
drugs than the average junkie."
In a scathing denouncement of
the sport as "our version of bread
and circuses." Meggyesy also re-
veals the under-the-table payoffs
and abuse of injured players he
saw first hand as a collegian at
Syracuse University.
Meggesey says in the Look ar-
ticle, excerpted from his forth-
c o m i n g book "Out of Their
League," that "the violent and
brutal player that television view-
ers marvel over on Saturdays and
Sundays is often a synthetic pro-
duct.
"When I got to the National
Football League, I saw players

fed, at an astonishing rate, not
only steroids, but also ampheta-
mines and barbiturates.
".. . Steroids are now thought
to cause atrophied testes, blunting
of sex drives and damage to the
liver. There is even talk among
some physicians that they are a
causal agent for cancer of the
prostate. But they are widely used.
". ..There are pro teams that
dispense amphetamines and bar-
biturates like penny candy."
Asked to comment on that phase
of Meggysey's article, Don Weiss,
public relations director for the
National Football League, said:
"we have no interest whatsoever
in promoting the sale of Meggye-
sy's book."
In St. Louis the Cardinal's
trainer, Jack Rockwell, also de-
clined comment as did coach
Charley Winner.
Meggysey writes that his dis-

illusionment with college football
came early in his career at Syra-
cuse when "one of the big shocks
of my freshman year was finding
out that a lot of the guys were
getting paid under the table."
Meggysey claims it was "com-
mon knowledge" that most of the
guys who played regularly were
getting anywhere from $25 to $50
after each game and said ar-
rangements were made for him to
pick up $30 a week in a brown
manila envelope.
"When a player is injured,"
Meggysey charged, "he is sent to
the team physician, who is usually
more concerned with getting his
athlete back into action than any-
thing else. This reversal of prior-
ities leads to unbelievable abuses."
Ben Schwartzwalder, Syracuse's
head football coach, and Chan-
cellor John Corbally Jr. of Syra-

cuse University refused comment
on the article.
Meggesey, who writes that he
turned down a $35,000 contract
to play for the Cardinals this
season, said injuries made him'
aware of the brutality of the game
rut admits he enjoyed the praise.
But he adds:
". .Now, after playing for 14
years, I can't really say if there
is any basic worth to the game. I
just can't separate the game from
the payoffs-approval, money, adu-
lation."
A St. Louis club official said yes-
terday Meggesey did not seem dis-
illusioned with football in his ear-
ly seasons as a pro.
"Only in his last couple of sea-
sons here did he seem any differ-
ent than any other football play-
er," said a source in the Car-
dinals' front office. "He became

active in politics and somewhat
of a loner."
The source, who requested his
name not be used, said Meggesey
began drifting away from others
players in his thinking after en-
rolling in graduate school and
working toward a master's de-
gree at the city's Washington Uni-
versity.
The front office source also
said Meggysey "because of his
political beliefs tried to get close
to some of the black players, who
apparently weren't too interested."
His closest friend in his last two
of seven years with the squad was
guard Rick Sortun, who along
with Meggysey announced his re-
tirement from the game last
spring.
"Once Meggysey became polit-
ically active he sort of drifted
apart from the rest of the guys.

1a

The world is our
warehouse,
you shall not
want.,
307J faoe
Ann Arbor, michigan 48108
no 3-4514

CATS HOPES DIMMED
OSU win may settle Rose spot

A

By KEN COHN
The battle for the Big Ten Rose
Bowl spot was virtually settled last
Saturday when Ohio State beat off
troublesome Northwestern, 24-10.
Practically the only thing that
could prevent the Buckeyes now,
4-0, from going to Pasadena would
be a loss to Michigan three weeks
from now and a Northwestern
sweep of the remaining three
games, which is less likely.
If that did happen, the Bucks
and Wildcats, now 3-1, would
wind up in a tie behind the Wol-
verines, and Northwestern might
1be given the nod by conference
officials by virtue of its 22-year
absence from the California clas-
sic.
Against Ohio State the Wild-
cats played their hearts out dur-
ing the first half, with fullback
Mike Adamle leading the way.
He rolled up over a hundred
yards on the ground before the
intermission, more than the en-
tire Buckeye team, and the Evan-
ston eleven, with the help of three
interceptions, took the lead, 10-3.

But the Buckeye machine took
control in the second half, holding
Northwestern to only four first
downs, and grinding out a total of
336 rushing yards. Big John
Brockington gained 161 of those
yards; he scored one touchdown,
while signal-caller Rex Kern went
over for two scores.
In Lafayette an aroused Illinois
team came back from two deficits
to score a stunning triumph over
Purdue. Only a week before, the
Illini had threatened to strike in
response to the firing of coach
Jim Valek.
With Valek at the helm, Illinois
fell behind, 14-0, at the end of the
first half, but charged back in the
third quarter.
Halfback Darrell Robinson led
the charge, totaling 120 yards in
the third quarter alone. A Mike
Navarro run and a Mike Wells
pass tied the game, and a field
goal put the Illini ahead. But they
trailed again after a Purdue TD.
Robinson answered the call,
bursting over for the clincher with

less than two minutes left in the
game. Thus, against Illinois Sat-
urday for the second week in a
row, the Wolverines will be play-
ing a losing team coming off a
victory.
Elsewhere in the Hoosier state,
Michigan State scored its second
straight conference win. In those
two games the Spartans have
scored more points than in their
previous four games combined.
Indiana was the victim this
time, 32-7, buried under a varied,
488-yard attack, that included
four TD passes off the arm of
quarterback M ik e Rasmussen.
Rasmussen's stellar performance
as a fill-in for injured first-
stringer George Mihaiu should go
a long way toward vaulting him
into the number one spot next
season.
Gordon Bowdell and Billy Joe
DuPree each caught two of those
scoring passes, while scatback
Eric Allen garnered 102 ground
yards and a TD.
The Spartan defense, which had
given up 148 points in its first five0-
games, has allowzed only seven
since the Michigan contest. It was
keynoted by 202-pound guard Er-
nie Hamilton, who had 12 solo
tackles.
In Minneapolis, fullback TimJ
Sullivan led Iowa from a fourth-
quarter 14-0 deficit to a 14-all
standoff with the snake-bittenx
MinnesotahGophers. Sullivan scor-c
ed from the 1 and the 2 in thee
space of four minutes to cap a9
137-yard personal effort.-
Both Iowa and Minnesota havei
gone winless over the last threet
weeks.'

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
CANDIDATES
AGAINST THE WAR
These Candidates Have Read and Endorsed the
PROPOSALS LISTED BELOW: **

I

-Associated Press
NORTHEASTERN FULLBACK Mike Adamle (34) flies over the
Ohio State defense for a touchdown in the first quarter of Satur-
day's game. Adamle picked up 102 yards on the ground in the
first half of the 24-10 Buckeye win.
Penalty kick decisive as
IBooters trip IBavarians

7

I1

CANDIDATE
PHILIP HART ........
MICHAEL STILLWAGON
SANDER LEVIN......
FRANK KELLEY.....
ANNETTA MILLER .. .
DAVID ROBINSON ... .
PATRICIA CARRIGAN.
DONALD STEVENS .. .
JAMES WATERS.....
LEON ATCHISON.... .
MAX PINCUS.........
GEORGE WAH R SALLAD
DON KOSTER ........
SUZANNE FREUND ...
DOROTHY HUNAWILL
JOHN EVANS........
VANELL WILLIAMS ..
GILBERT LEE ........
kERNEST QUENON ....
NELSON MEADE . .
ALBERT BREDERNITZ .
JERRY BENNETT .....
JOHN F. BARNES .....
JAMES M. CREGAR ...

FOR OFFICE OF

U.S. Naval Civil Engineering Lab
Recruiting Representative
from
Port Hueneme, California
(where you ski in the morning
and surf in the afternoon)
Interviewing graduates with
MS and PhD DEGREES
in
Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, Sanitary,
Solid Wates Eng., Engineering Mechanics
on
Friday, November: 6, 1910
Interview appointments and info at your Placement
Office. All positions are in the Federal Career Civil
Service-an equal opportunity employer.,'

.... U.S. Senator
. ... U.S. Congress, 2d Dist.
.Governor
.... Attorney Genl.
.... State Board of Education
.... State Board of Education
.... Mich. St. Bd. of Trustees
.... Mich. St. Bd. of Trustees
.. . U of M Bd. of Regents
.... Wayne St. Bd. of Governors
.... Wayne St. Bd. of Governors
)E .. State Sen. 18th Sentrl. Dist.
.... State Rep. 53d Dist.
.... State Rep. 52d Dist.
.... Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 2d Dist.
... Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 4th Dist.
.... Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 5th Dist.
.... Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 6th Dist.
.... Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 7th Dist.
.... Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 8th Dist.
.... Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 9th Dist.
.... Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 11th Dist.
.... Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 12th Dist.
.... Washt. Cnty. Commssnr., 12th Dist.

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In a game marred by numerous
penalties Michigan's booters edged
out a determined Bavarian Kick-
ers squad Sunday, 1-0, at Toledo.
The only score came as a result
of a penalty kick by the Wolver-
ine's Jean Gilles midway through'
the first half.
Utilizing an unusual formation
with three forwards, three half-
backs, and four fullbacks Michi-
gan took charge in the first half.
The strategy of this line-up was
to bolster the defense and to keep
midfield under control. The ad-
mittedly weakened offense was to
be keyed by the three halfbacks.
The Bavarian's countered with
an unbalanced line-up in which
they flooded one side of the field-
or the other to try and break
through the Michigan defense.
In the first half Michigan dom-
inated play with their defense.
But the Bavarian's still' had an
ample number of opportunities to
score as several penalties gave
them free shots in the Michigan
Wie Don't Care
What You Do
With the Money
You Save on
Student Supplies

|i

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in

end. But Michigan forced the
Bavarians towards the outside and
enabled them to have several
throw-ins near the Wolverine
goal.
Michigan was the team that did
most of the pressuring in the first
half. Yet they still could not score
until Gilles placed his penalty
shot into the left side of the
Bavarians' goal.
The second halfrsaw the Wol-
verines sit on their lead as they
fell back into a completely defen-
sive position. Still the Kickers
from Toledo were able to threaten
with several corner kicks, but the
fine defense of Michigan's goalie
Karl Krotki kept the Wolverines
in the lead.
The Bavarian's missed their best
chance of the afternoon when a
penalty shot from right in front
of the Michigan goal went wide.
Michigan sorely missed captain
Miguel Taube at the halfback slot.
He missed the match due to an
injury incurred in last week's
United game. Taube's leg is in a
cast and he will probably miss the
last two games of the season.
Michigan now leads the drive
for the Toledo League champion-
ship 'with a 5-1 record. The boot-
ers' last league game will be Sun-
day against The Bavarian Sports
Club in Toledo. The Wolverines
also meet Northern Illinois in a
collegiate match on Saturday at
Illinois.
APPLE WINE
IS FINE
REDUCED PRICES AT
THE ODYSSEY
EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT
208 W. HURON
761-0110

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OVER 25,000 LP'S, OVER 300 LABELS IN STOCK
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ITEMS CHANGING WEEKLY
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668-9866 665-3679 MICH.

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1. A Publicized Timetable for Rapid Withdrawal of All'
American Troops from Indochina;
***2. An Immediate End to All Bombing by American Planes
of Any Country in Indochina;
***3. A Drastic Reduction in the Subsidization of Military
Operations in These Countries;
***4. A Substantial Reduction in the Use of Our Taxes for
Military Appropriations Including Armaments; and

"NEW
MORNING"
BOB DYLAN'S NEW L.P.
FROM COLUMBIA
NOW SALE PRICED
ONLY $359
SALE ENDS FRIDAY 11/6
iscount records

FOLLETTS
Just Spend
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CONE: Black Theology and the Renewal of the Church

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SALE
3 3.79
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