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November 03, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-03

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RADICAL FILM SERIES
PRESENTS
BENJAMIN CHRISTENSEN'S
WITCHFRAT THROUGH THE AGES

page three

im4c

tri i g n

40
Batty

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Tuesday, November 3, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Tuesday, Nov. 3
ALICE'S RESTAURANT
ALICE LLOYD HALL-

Wednesday, Nov. 4
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
admission 75c

7, 9, 11 p.m.

news briefs
By The Associated Press

Conference on

I

THE PROJECT COMMUNITY
presents
Frederick Wiseman's documentary
"HIGH SCHOOL"
"When you are being addressed by someone older than you or
in a seat of authority, it's your job to respect and listen. We are
out to establish that you can be a man and that you can take
orders."
HIGH SCHOOL
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9th
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
7:00 P.M. and 9:05 P.M.
Contribution $1.00

11

arms

resumes

I

TERRY TATE
TONIGHT
at the
'ARK
75c
1421 Hill 8:30 761-1451

RICHARD CARDINAL CUSHING, 75, Roman Catholic arch-
bishop of the Boston archdiocese since 1944 and a close friend
of the Kennedy family, died of cancer yesterday.
He said the inaugural prayer for President John F. Kennedy in
1961 and, three years later, performed the funeral Mass for the as-
sissinated president.
Cushing had retired in early October due to ill health.
* * *
A SELF-STYLED "chicano revolutionary" hijacked a United
Airlines jet with 75 persons aboard to Cuba yesterday, taking two
children along with him for the 2,500 mile flight from California
to Havana.
The jet's scheduled flight to Los Angeles and Portland, Ore., was
interrupted moments after take-off from San Diego late Sunday.
Capt. Joe Kolons stopped in Tijuana, Mexico for fuel and then flew
on to Havana with the middle-aged gunman sitting in the cockpit.
* K* 7R
U.S. B52 BOMBERS struck in South Vietnam yesterday for
the first time in over three weeks. The giant planes bombed
enemy positions in northermost Quang Tri Province near Khe
Sanh.
Quang Tri is one of five South Vietnamese provinces swept by
floods that have already killed nearly 200 persons.
Other planes continued to attack the Ho Chi Minh trail, just
across the border in Laos, in the most intensive B52 campaign of
the war.
* * *
144 PERSONS PERISHED Sunday in a dance hall fire in
Saint Laurent Du Pont, France. The dance hall never received of-
ficial fire department permission to open for business, a depart-
ment inspector said yesterday.
The emergency exits had been locked to discourage gatecrashers."
The victims, mostly youths, were stacked in charred heaps by useless
exits.
Witnesses said the fire, possibly caused by a discarded cigarette,
consumed the interior within minutes.
THE UNITED STATES and the Soviet Union launched the
U.N. General Assembly's disarmament debate yesterday by urgingI
quick approval of a proposed treaty banning nuclear weapons
from the ocean floor.
There seemed little doubt that the 127-nation assembly would
endorse the treaty overwhelmingly.1
ABOUT 20 INMATES at Cummins State Prison Farm in
Pine Bluf, Ark. seized four persons at the prison yesterday and j
threatened to kill them unless their demands for freedom were E
met.
All of the hostages were released 13 hours later after Gov.1
Winthrop Rockefeller said authorities would not yield to the inmates'
demands.t
U.S. Dist. Judge J. Smith Henley ruled Feb. 18 that conditions
at Cummins constituted cruel and inhuman punishment in violation
of the U.S. Constitution.
* * *
ALMOST 20 YEARS AGO, Richard M. Nixon, then Cali-
fornia's junior Republican senator, unsuccessfully sponsored a
bill to make it a crime to fire or discipline a federal employe
for testifying before a congressional committee.
Later this month, Sen. William Proxmire, (D-Wis.,) will reintro-
duce that bill in his fight to force the administration to reinstate
Ernest Fitzgerald, a Pentagon cost expert who was fired after he}
testified before Proxmire's Joint Economic Committee.
In his testimony, Fitzgerald disclosed the Air Force's giant C5A
transport plane would cost at least $2 billion more than original
estimates.
* * *
A HOUSE SUBCOMMITTEE says GI blackmarketing of drug
shipments and truckloads of PX goods in Thailand has been con-
firmeduby Armv ' in. L ti.5atnrs.. Th s ize of the o erations is 3

-Associated Press
Cans squashed
A workman driving a forklift prepares to dump a load of beer and
soft drink cans into a bin at a Reynolds Metal Company facility
in Los Angeles. The company has opened several redemption
centers that pay 10 cents a pound for cans which will be recycled.
CAMPAIGN LOOPHOLE:
Brokerage firms
make contributions

HELSINKI, Finland (N) - The United States and the
Soviet Union moved yesterday into the third round of
strategic arms limitation talks (SALT) with prepared state-
ments voicing hope for progress in vital and delicate negotia-
tions.
Their envoys had their first unofficial get-together
Sunday night at the Russians' hotel. They agreed then to
hold the first serious business talks today at the Soviet
Embassy.
After that, twice-weekly meetings will alternate between
the Soviet and the U.S. embassies.
The talks, marking the two superpowers' biggest effort
to date to try for a curb on increasingly costly and deadly
nuclear arms competition, began here with a five-week
preliminary sounding late last ----

year and continued w i t h
a second business round seeking
common ground on a "positive" at-
mosphere in Vienna.
Thirty-odd meetings were held
there over four months before re-
cess Aug. 17.
The Americans, according to in-
formed sources, now are awaiting
a response from the Russians to
an outline presented in Vienna
that was reported to include pro-
posals for a package deal on limit-
ing big offensive missiles and long
range bombers as well as antibal-
listic defense systems.
Washington will be watching
the third round of SALT closely
for indications that the Russians
still mean busines, in the nuclear
arms curb effort, after develop-
ments in the Mideast, Cuba, Ber-
lin and elsewhere that have in-
creasingly chilled U.S.-Soviet re-
lations over the past few months.
Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister
Vladimir S. Semenov's opening re-
marks yesterday seemed to indi-
cate a will on the Russians' part
to continue the previous work-
manlike attitude in the talks, de-
spite a brief polemic reference.
Stating that the Soviet Union
attaches great importance to the
talks, he asserted : "The Soviet
Union has consistently come out
in favor of the relaxation of ,the
arms race fanned by certain im-
perialist circles, and the strength-
ening of international security. It
is from these positions that we
conduct these negotiations.'

a

Creativ'e lpt4 9eootioaI

WASHINGTON (W) - S t o c k'
brokerage firms across the coun-
try, using a hole in the Corrupt
Practices Act, have been making
political contributions for con-
gressional races.
At least eight brokerage houses
have tossed in $5,000 each to a
national campaign fund passing
out donations to Senate and{
House candidates, including in-
cumbents linked to financial leg-
islation.
The contributions include two
sums for Texas congressmen un-
opposed in today's election.
The Securities Industry Cam-
paign Committee has reported
$62,000 raised so far, with more
than half of the money still be-
ing sent out in the closing mo-
ments of the campaign.
The Corrupt Practices Act out-
laws political contributions by
national banks, corporations and
labor unions. But most of the top
brokerage f i r m s are set up as
partnerships, n o t corporations,
and therefore are not covered by
the ban.

nations went to Republican con-
gressmen running for Senate this
year. It reported $2,000 for George
Bush in Texas, $1,500 for Lowell
E. Weicker Jr. in Connecticut, and
$1,000 for Lawrence J. Burton in
Utah.
Another $1,000 went to Conser-
vative candidate James Buckley in
' New York. Republican National
Chairman Rogers C. B. Morton
was also given $1,000 for his con-
gressional race in Maryland.

Q uenon in
race with
Nielsen
By AARON HOSTYK
Ernest Quenon, Dem., is chal-
lenging the incumbent Republican
Bent Nielsen for his seat on the
Washtenaw County Board of Com-
missioners for the seventh district
which includes the University of
Michigan.
Both candidates emphasize their
desire to increase social services
in the county. Quenon would like
to increase the county welfare ap-
propriations. He says that "we
don't administer our social welfare
system with a heck of a lot of
concern for welfare recipients."
Nielsen says, however, that since
the state is running "90 per cent
of the show" in the welfare area
and contributing most of the funds
that the whole program should be
administered by the state.
Nielsen points to his twelve
years of experience on the Board
and says that in the last two
years educational services for the
county have increased substan-
tially. For example an information
program has been set up to in-
form indigent people about the
federally sponsored Food Stamp
Program, he adds.
Quenon hopes to institute a
narcotics control center and re-
place the present county hospital,
which he calls a "fire trap," with
a new facility.
One of Quenon's main campaign
issues is his claim that the Board
is dominated by rural interests and
unresponsive to urban needs.
He also says that the county is
not getting as much tax money
as it should because of "systematic
under-assessment of land outside
of cities."
Nielsen denies the charge of un-
due rural influence on the Board
and says that township assess-
ments outside of the cities have
gone up dramatically In the last
few years.
Quenon, who was defeated in
his campaign for re-election to
City Council last year, has been
vocal in his opposition to the
Vietnam war.

100 marchers demonstrate
in support of Angela Davis

By DEBRA THAL
More than a hundred people
marched around the campus ar-
ea Sunday night in a demon-
stration supporting Angela Da-
vis.
Davis, a black Communist,
has been charged with murder
and kidnaping in connection
with a shootout outside a court-
room in San Rafael, Califor-
nia in August, which resulted in
four deaths.
Guns used in the incident were
allegedly purchased in Davis'
name.
Led by a vanguard of women
armed with noisemakers, the

demonstrators marched f r o m
the Diag around the Hill area,
down Geddes and Forest to
Oakland, to Pizza Bob's a n d
then to the Newman Center.
As the marchers followed their
police escort they chanted and
sang.
"Male chauvinists you better
start shakin', today's pig is to-
morrow's bacon," was a popular
refrain.
The group varied in size from
over 150 people during much of
the march to approximately 60
when the weary protesters final-
ly trudged into t h e Newman
Center at the end of the march.

MASS MEETING

irme ny army ives g~t~b .ne sz i6eupea1i51
undetermined. The securities fund had made
The most popular black market items are amphetamines, barbit- only scattered small contributions
urates, and veneral-disease drugs, according to an Army enlisted going into the last few days. But
two of them went for Rep. Bob
man who participated in the illegal activities. Eckhardt, D-Tex., and Rep. Hen-
ry Gonzales, D-Tex., both unop-
J in Thealy posed for re-election.
The securities fund's largest do-

r.a As. ask r rrrwwrr rr f /ilrwr 4 r Mr Mr !sA

EMU UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIE5USOARD presents
TRAFFIC
and
TEAGARDEN & VAN WINKLE
NOVEMBER 8-8:30 P.M.
at Bowen Fieldhouse-Ypsilanti, Mich.
TICKETS: $3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $4.50
AVAILABLE NOW at: Little Things, Ann Arbor
EMU McKenny Union, Ypsilanti
Ned's Bookstore, Ypsilanti
J.L. Hudson, Detroit

T hursday, Friday, and Saturday (Nov. 5, 6, 7)
WHEN PURCHASED WITH A
STYLING SET at $5.00
Total $7.5 0
(e"xtra for 'very long hair)
607 south forest avenue
~~ by appointment only 66M6301

Wednesday & Thursday

November 4th & 5th

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
PRESENTS
THE LOVE OF DON PERLIMPTON
AND BELISA IN THE GARDEN
by Frederico Garcia Lorca
AND
SAND
by Murray Mednick
ARENA THEATRE, Frieze Building
Promptly at 4:10 p.m. or earlier if theatre is filled
ADMISSION FREE
SINGLE SALES
BEGIN TOMORROW !
UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN PRFESIOALTHETR POGRAM

ENDS WEDNESDAY-STATE THEATER (At State
Joe Namath & Ann-Margret in "C.C. & COMPANY" (R)

& Liberty) DIAL 662-6264
OPEN 12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

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Kof a Pigeon Kicker

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Meet Jonathan.
The very day he graduated Princeton
he became a New York taxi driver.
(Then, he met Jennifer.)

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