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November 01, 1970 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-01

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Sunday, November 1, 1*97Q

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Sunday, November 1, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rratic

gri ders

dow n

Badgers

on this and that'
Badgers down .. .
but not out

eric siegel..

MADISON
Michigan throttled Wisconsin's upset hopes here yesterday
by a score of 29-15, but no one in the Badger lockerroom was
walking like a loser.
"Sure, we're a little disappointed and discouraged," the
Badgers' rookie coach John Jardine said after the game. "But
Michigan's a great football team. You can't spot a team like
that three touchdowns.
"But I was proud of our team in the second half," he
continued. "We came back and we kept fighting, but we
just couldn't capitalize our breaks."
Neil Graff, the Badgers' junior quarterback, was one of
those who was disappointed, but he was hardly ready to give
up on the rest of the season. "We really wanted this game," he
said. "It really meant a lot to us."
"But I think we proved we can play a top .team and do a
good job against them," he added. "I don't think we'll have a
letdown after this; if anything, I think it will give us a lift."
Graff, who was the fourth leading passer in the Big Ten
going into yesterday's game, was the man 'the Badgers had
counted on to pull off their upset. Jardine had said before the
game that he expected to have trouble running against Michigan,
and he didn't try to hide the fact that he planned to go to the
air.
His prediction ran true to form, too, as the Badgers picked
up only 79 yards on the ground, and only five years net rushing
in the second half.
And so it was left up to Graff, who gained 168 yards
through the air on 11 of 23 completions, to give the Badgers
their second major upset of the season and even their record
at 3-3-1.
It was Graff who led the Badgers to an upset 29-16 win over
Penn State earlier in the year, passing for three long touchdown
bombs
Yesterday, though, the Wolverines cut off the bomb. Graff
connected on a 17 yard touchdown pass to running back "A-
Train" Thompson at the end of the. second quarter, and threw
a 37 and a 27 yard pass, but most of his completions were out
over the middle to his backs, and while they picked up yardage,
they didn't score points.
"Michigan was sending a linebacker out, and they had an
end dropping off, and that made it hard to throw long," Graff
said.
Graff also ran fairly well yesterday. He gained 65 yards in
22 carries, but he was thrown for losses totaling 38 yards, and
so he wound up with a 1.2 yards per carry average.
What made the Badgers failure to put off the upset just
a little more discouraging was the fact that they came so
close to a victory. Michigan Coach Bo Schembechler said,
"They had every combination a team could want for an upset
and they couldn't do it." And the Wisconsin lockerroom
voiced its affirmation of the sentiment.
"I think we had the opportunities to win," Graff said, "But
we just kept falling short."
"We got fired up in the second half," Jardine said. "We got
more than our share of the breaks, and in the third quarter I
was very confident. But we just got stopped too many times."
Both Graff and Jardine thought that a crucial series came
at the end of the third quarter. The Badgers, down 21-12, had
the ball on the Michigan 20 after halfback Billy Taylor fumbled
but had to settle for a field goal. "It would have made a tre-
mendous difference if we had scored," said Graff, who had two
passes broken up by defensive back Tom Darden and a third
knocked down by middle guard Henry Hill.
As it was, the Badgers actually outscored the Wolverines
9-8 in the second half, and fell just a few yards short of
scoring another touchdown at the end of the game.
And while six of Wisconsin's points came on an 85-yard punt
return, they still counted on the scoreboard, and showed that
the Badgers had a threat besides Graff and the bomb. And the
Badger defense proved it could contain a high-povered offense,
too.
The play of the Badgers this year, while somewhat erratic
and seldom brilliant, has nevertheless been an improvement over
the past three years, when the team went 3-26-1. When Jardine
took over as coach from John Coatta in December, many people
were disgruntled, saying Coatta, who was here only three years,
never really got a fair chance.
Now the critics have been silenced, attendance is up
over 32 per cent from last year and no one around here, least
of all the Badger players, are conceding anything to anyone.
"I think we can get up and give Ohio State a helluva
fight,"' Wisconsin's offensive guard Keith Nesbusch said. "If
we put it all together, we're going to blow somebody off the
field. I hope it's them."
- -t- - - - - - --d- - - - - - - - - -

By PHIL HERTZ
Special To The Daily
MADISON - Michigan's
Mammoth Blue Wave yes-
terday rolled over the Wis-
consin Badger goal line for
three first half touchdowns,
but had to hold on for its
very football life before a
B a d g e r surge fell short,
allowing the Wolverines to
c a p t u r e their s e v e n t h
straight victory, 29-15.
The Maize and Blue appeared
headed for an easy victory over
the Badgers as they had com-
plete control of the contest dur-
ing the opening two periods.
Michigan reeled off 15 first
downs in the opening half and
stifled Wisconsin for much of
the first 30 minutes. The Wol-
verines were running up yard-
age either through the air or on
the ground, but lingering over
the play were errors that pre-
vented, them from completely
pushing Wisconsin out of Camp
Randall stadium.
The first scoring threat came
early in the contest after Don
Moorhead fumbled the ball on
the Michigan 36, but the
Badgers, like most of Mich-
igan's opponents, were unable
to do anything against the
Michigan defensive unit, and
punted the ball to the Michigan
two, wheredthe Wolverines took
over and drove to midfield be-
fore stalling.
Three plays after the Badgers
gained possession, Henry Hill

SUNDAY SPORTS
NIGHT EDITORS: MORT NOVECK AND JERRY CLARKE

-Associated Press
IT TAKES FOUR HANDS to handle a henry, Hill, that is, as Jim Fedenia (51) and an unidentified
mate combine to spring Wisconsin quarterback Neil Graff (12). Hill and his defensive cohorts har-
assed Graff and blanketed his receivers most of the afternoon, and the Badger signal-caller spent
a busy a day scrambling around Camp Randall Stadium pursued by Wolverines.

jarred the ball loose from Wis-
consin tailback Rufus "Road-
runner" Ferguson and Jim Betts
fell on the ball at the Wiscon-
sin 32-yard line.
Moorhead immediately hit
Paul Staroba for a 20 yard gain
and three plays later Moorhead
hit Fritz Seyferth with a swing
pass for an eight-yard touch-
down, giving the Wolverines a
7-0 lead at the end of the first
quarter.
The Badgers came right back
at the Wolverines and mounted
a sustained drive, which proved
futile when Marty Huff stop-
ped Wisconsin quarterback Neil
Graff for no gain on fourth and
one at the Michigan 12. The
action went right back the other
way as the Wolverines went 88
yards in six plays to make the
score 13-0. The big play in this
drive was a 70-yard pass play
from Moorhead to Staroba,
which set up Seyferth for a
three yard touchdown plunge.
The catch by Staroba was
one of six for 178 yards by the
senior split end. Bo Schembech-
ler later said, "Staroba played
really well. It was perhaps his
best g a m e." Moorhead also
praised him: "Staroba made
some great catches, especially
the one on the 70-yard play."
After this score the Main-
month Blue Wave began to take
on the appearance of a-jugger-
naut. The defense again throt-
tled the Badgers, and the of-
fense, regaining possession after
a punt, reeled 76\ yards in 11
plays for the third Michigan
touchdown. Preston Henry took
a pitch-out from Moorhead the
last four yards and the score,
making it 19-0. Moorhead fol-
lowed the six-pointer by com-
pleting a pass to Staroba for the
two-point conversion.
At this point, however, the
tide seemed to turn. Perhaps it
was the effect of the record-
breaking homecoming crowd of
72,389. Perhaps it was simply
as Schembechler later said, "We
didn't play well, and Wisconsin
has a good team." Perhaps there
was a bit of a lapse after it had
been so easy to build up the
score. But in any case, the
Badgers suddenly came alive.

The major figure in the in-
itial stages of the Wisconsin re-
surgence was quaterback Graff.
He scrambled for 29 yards and
passed for another 59 as he
drove the Badgers downfield for
their first score, making the
halftime score 21-6. The last 16
yards were eaten up with a pass
from Graff to fullback Alan "A-
Train" Thompson.
The largest football crowd
ever to watch a football game
in the state of Wisconsin really,
came alive in the second half
when Dan Crooks returned one
of Staroba's punts 87 yards
down the sideline for the
Badgers' second six-pointer. The
attempt at the two point con-
version failed, leaving Michigan
ahead 21-12.
The Badger momentum con-
tinued to build when Glenn
Doughty fumbled at the Mich-
igan 43, but while the offense
continued to make a plethora of
mistakes, the defense continued
to do their job and throttle the
Badgers.
Wisconsin failed to be daunt-
ed by this particular failure;
and were soon knocking on
Michigan's doorstep again. This
time the defense tightened and
stopped the Badgers at the
Michigan 30 when Roger Jae-
ger's 47-yard field goal fell way
short. Wisconsin was right back
in scoring territory one play
later when Bill Taylor fumbled
on the Michigan 25, setting up
an eventual 32-yard field goal
by Jaeger, making the score
21-15.
After the Badger field goal,
the Michigan offense again took
control of the game, driving into
Badger territory three times,
finally scoring with a little over
four minutes remaining in the
contest. The first Michigan
drive faltered when Doughty
and Taylor dropped consecutive
passes from Moorhead, the next
failed when Dana Coin missed
a 33-yard field goal. But the
final one succeeded when Moor-
head found Staroba open in the
end zone for a 21 yard touch-
down pass. Bill Taylor followed
the touchdown by crashing over
for the two point conversion,
completing the game's scoring.

MISTAKES HURT

Erro r,
By PAT ATKINS
Special To The Daily
MADISON - When a football
team runs away with a game, that
team's mistakes on the field have

flagrant in v

grt

. . 4. ..... ....... ........... ..
Big Ten Standings

Conference Games

All Games

a way of quietly slipping into the W L T
background. MICHIGAN 4 0 0
But yesterday afternoon in Mad- Ohio State 4 0 0
ison, Michigan did not win until Northwestern 3 1 0
11:39 of the final quarter and the Michigan State 2 2 0
mistakes didn't disappear unob- Micntate 220
strusively into the woodwork as in innesota 1 2 1
some previous games. Iowa 1 2 1
"Lord knows." said Michigan Illinois 1 3 0
head coach Bo Schembechler, Purdue 1 3 0
"that wasn't our best game. Wis- Wisconsin 1 3 0
consin had every circumstance a Indiana 1 3 0
team could want for an upset and,
they couldn't do it . . our mis- covering punts, and in not get-
takes, officials, calls, we just play- ting down on kick-offs.
ed bad." "It can happen to any team,"
It all really began for Michi- Schembechler said.+

PF
141
129
120
89
58
41
76
59
73
49

PA
48
47
52
70
81
89
147
93
89
109

W
7
6
3
3
2
1
3
3
2
1

L
0
0
4
4,
4
5
4
4
4
6

T
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0

PF
182
219
161
133
129
65
128
100
123
82

PA
70
70
120
155
157
178
186
153
140
197

I

gan just before the end of the
half, whenWisconsin's quarter-
back Neil Graff on a delayed full-
back pass play, deposited the ball
right into Alan "A Train" Thomp-
son's outstretched arms. Ordin-
arily, the Michigan defense con-
verges quickly on the fullback and
no real damage, other than short
yardage is done. The Wolverine
defense got to Thompson event-
ually in this case too, but not
before he had scampered into the
end zone to make the score at
halftime 21-6.
"One of our difficulties,"
Schembechler explained, "was
that sometimes we had an individ-
ual defensive lapse. And other
times we left the center area open
and unprotected."
There were plenty of other dif-
ficulties, and Schembechlerpoint-
ed them out in the manner of an
old school-master taking a delin-
quent student to task.
The problem was carelessness in
dropped passes, in fumbles, in not
--- -
s: :4 :,

In the space of the opening
three minutes of the second half,
Michigan watched an uncontrolled
nightmare unfold as Danny
Crooks took a punt return 37 yards
deep in Wisconsin territory and
s 1 i p p e d, virtually unmolested,
downfield for the second Badger
touchdown. That moved the score
to 21-12, making it time for the
Mammoth Blue Wave to begin
rolling again.

Fortunately for the Wolverines,
the Don Moorhead - Paul Staroba
combination began clicking again
as it had on Michigan's first three
touchdown drives. And this time
Staroba even got some glory to
score one of them, instead of just
carrying the burden of the drive.
On the Wolverine's fourth
touchdown drive of 90 yards, Star-
oba went behind Nate Butler in
the end zone to catch Moorhead's
21-yard toss. That brought h i s
total yardage for the day to 178 on
six catches.

7ic tory
"Staroba is a fine receiver. He
made a great catch (on the 70
yard play to set up Michigan's
second touchdown). Butler had
him all the way, but he just went
up in the air and caught it. Of
course, Moorhead put it right in
there."
Staroba picked off a 19 yard
pass from Moorhead on Michigan's
first touchdown drive to put the
ball on the 12 yard line and set up
Fritz Seyferth's score.
Again on the third touchdown
march, his over the shoulder grab
of Moorhead's bomb was what
brought him the praise of Jar-
dine. His heroics weren't over by
any means, as he came through
again on the 74-yard third touch-
down drive. He took a quick pass
from Moorhead and stepped down
the left sideline for a 17-yard
gain.
"Staroba is really difficult to
defend," Schembechler said of
his split end, "it was perhaps his
best game of the year."
Billy Taylor summed up the Wol-
verines' performance in a phrase.
"We made a lot of mistakes and
we were fortunate to win, but
sometimes you just have to get a
'bad game out of your system."
rs
WISCONSIN
Rushing
Tries Gains Loss Net
Graff 22 65 38 27
SThompson14 55 1 54
>Ferguson 7 6 8 --2
Totals 43 126 47 79
Passing
Att. Comp. Int. Yds.
IGraff 23 11 1 168
Pass Receiving
No. Yds.
Mialik 5 83
Thompson 2 32
Moon 1 27
Klosek 1 12
Marks 1 8
Ferguson 1 6
Totals .11 168
Punting
No. Yds. lAvg.
Buss 6 247 41.2
LINESCORE

.V.V........... .- * . v.A s 4k11n": v...

Burping the Badger

FIRST DOWNS
Rushing
Passing
Penalty
TOTAL NUMBER
OF RUSHES
NET YARDS-
Rushing
Passing
FORWARD PASSES
Attempted
Completed
Intercepted by
TOTAL PLAYS
(Rushesand passes)
PUNTS, Number
Average distance
KICKOFFS, returned by
YARDS KICKS
RETURNED
Punts
Kickoffs
FUMBLES, Number
Ball lost by

Mich.
24
15
9
0

Wisc.
17
6
9
2

61 43
227 79
223 168

PENALTIES, Number 5
! Yards Penalized 65
MICHIGAN
Rushing
Tries Gains
W. Taylor 18 82
Seyferth 16 51
Moorhead 11 39
Doughty 7 ;33
Henry 9 25
Totals 61 230
Passing
Att. Comp.1
Moorhead 22 11
Pass Receiving
Staroba
Doughty
Seyferth,
Paul Seymour
Totals

2
83
4
42.8
3
66
16
50
4
3

23
11
0
66
6
41.2
5

S 4
20
Loss Net
0 82
0 51
3 36
0 33
0 25
3 227
Int. Yds.
0 223
No. Yds.
6 178
3 30
1 8
1 7
11 223

GRIDDE PICKINGS
MICHIGAN 29, Wisconsin 15
Iowa 14, Minnesota 14, tie
Ohio State 24, Northwestern 1
Illinois 23, Purdue 21
Michigan State 32, Indiana 7
Cornell 31, Columbia 20
Penn State 42, West Virginia
Georgia Tech 24, Duke 16'
Auburn 63, Florida 14
Georgia 52, South Carolina 34
Kentucky 27, No. Carolina St.
Tulane 10, Vanderbilt 7
Nebraska 29, Colorado 13
Kansas State 17, Missouri 13
TCU 24, Baylor 14
Air Force 23, Arizona 20
California 13, USC 10
Stanford 48, Oregon St. 10
Da.tmouth 10, Yale 0
Daily Libels over uac Muggers
East
Boston Univ. 34, Connecticut
Clarion 28, Shippensburg 0
Harvard 28, Pennsylvania 23
Maine 24, Northeastern 17
New Hampshire 59, Rhode Ish
Boston College 21, Army 13
Syracuse 43, Pittsburgh 13
Villanova 42, Xavier 14
Buffalo 16,5Holy Cross 0
Delaware 15, Temple 13
Fordham 21, St. Johns 21,/tie
South
Arkansas 45, Texas A&M 6
Houston 21, Tulsa 9
Texas 42, SMU 15
Alabama 35, Mississippi St. 6
Davidson 55, VMI 21
N. Carolina 30, Virginia 15

SCORES
Richmond 51, Citadel 14
Tennessee 41, Wake Forest 7
Clemson 24, Maryland 11
0 Virginia Tech 35, William & Mary 14
East Carolina 7,'Furman 0
Florida A&M 7, Tuskeegee 0
Morgan State 15, N. Carolina A&T 9
8 Middle Tennessee St. 14, Ball St;7
West Kentucky 24, Morehead St. 14
?Midwest
Notre Dame 56, Navy 7
2 Indiana St. 28, Illinois St. 7
Kansas St. 17; Missouri 13
Oklahoma 29, Iowa St. 28
Washington, Mo. 23,
Carnegie-Mellon 14
Abilene 33, Drake 13
Bowling Green 26, Marshall 24
Cincinnati 35, Wichita State 5
Toledo 14, Miami, Ohio 13
, inc. Wayne St. 24, Illinois, Chicago 8
West Michigan 52, Ohio U. 23
9 Wittenberg 36, Ohio Wesleyan 0
West
Brigham Young 23, Wyoming 3
Colorado St. 20, Utah St. 13
and 7 Idaho 27, Montant St. 24
Montana 31, Portland St. 25
NBA
New York 107, Detroit 89
Milwaukee 121, Cincinnati 100
Boston 133, Philadelphia 102
Baltimore 106, Phoenix 103
San Diego 121, Atlanta 117
ABA
Floridians 116, Indiana 104
Virginia 113, Pittsburgh 110
NHL
Boston 6, New York 0
Minnesota 3, Toronto 1

234
101
133
1

Punting

g

1 Staroba

No. Yds. Ave. MICHIGAN
4 171 42.8 Wisconsin

6 15 0 8-29
0 6 9 0-15

Baby

Blue ground game routs MSU

By ELLIOT LEGOW
Led by a tremendous rushing attack
and a hard-tackling defense, Michigan's
freshman football team overwhelmed
Michigan State 41-22 yesterday, and
showed Michigan fans that football suc-
cess is here to stay for quite a few more
years.
Coach Tirell Burton utilized half a
dozen running backs and three quarter-
backs and received creditable perform-
ances from all of them. Leading the of-
fensive explosion was 5-10 tailback, Harry
Banks who rushed for 191 yards including
two long jaunts of 59 and 67 yards.
Burton was very impressed with Banks'
performance and also praised the work
of fullbacks Ed Shuttlesworth and Bob
Thornbladh. Both made good vardage on

returned it to the MSU 20. However,
Michigan's offense stalled and the Spar-
tans took over on their own 10.
On the first play of the series wolfback
Jeff Steger broke through the MSU line
to drop Niesen inside his own one. A third
down quick kick reached the State 20 and
the Blue were able to move from there
for the score in four plays. Thornbladh
blasted in from the seven for the touch-
down.
Neither team could mount a sustained
drive until early in the second period
when Michigan, led by quarterback Tom
Slade marched from its own 48 to the
Spartan 17 where the drive faltered. A
field goal attempt by Dave Brandon, was
wide.
On their next series of downs with

speedster Mike Holt exploded through the
line, broke a tackle at the 50, and raced
down the right sideline for the MSU
score. A two point conversion tightened
the count to 14-8.
But Casey moved the Wolverines back
down the field, covering 64 yards in only
three minutes. The second string back-
field of Don Coleman, Shuttlesworth, and
Larry Gustafson picked up good yardage
against Michigan State's outclassed de-
fense.
Michigan State found the going easier
in the opening series of the second half,
as the Spartans who managed only three
first downs in the first half picked up
five as they drove 80 yards from their
own 20 to pull again to within six, 21-15.
The snr erme n a 49 vyrd hnmh frnm

the goal line and pulled down at the
State nine.
The final Michigan TD came on a
seven yard pas from Slade to Clint Has-
lerig with only one second remaining in
the game, and gave the Baby Blue a 41-22,
victory.
Slade, Casey, and Greg Koss split the
Michigan quarterbacking almost evenly,
but Burton felt that none really had
enough opportunity to play. "The quar-
terbacks all ran the team well,"'Burton
asserted, but he admitted "the passing
was not as good as we expected it to be.
Most of the fault for the poor passing,
Burton feels, was the poor blocking of the
offensive line. "They blocked well till
they got tired. The tackles had to play

., ... ., :-_, r 5 any 5
n7
........ . :.; .. .i.; '

mo ..x.- mo

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