100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 01, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, November 1, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

* Sunday, November 1, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

ANGELA DAVIS & WELFARE RIGHTS ORGANIZATION & DETROIT NCCF
RALLY/MARCH
Meet 6:00 Sunday on Diag, Bring kazoos, noisemakers, music and
theater to wake up the community about the war against Black
America
BENEFIT/PARTY

I

MUSIC! DANCING!
Iron Horse Express
and more rock and roll bands

FILMS ! SPEAKERS
from Huron High
BSU, WRO

newsbriefs
By The Associated Press
U.N. SECRETARY-GENERAL U THANT has reached a firm
and irrevocable decision to step down from his post at the end
of 1971 despite efforts to draft him for a third term, an author-
atative source reported yesterday.
Sources close to Thant, who will be 63 when his second five-year
term expires in December, 1971, said that the only reason for delaying
the announcement of his retirement is his desire to avoid a long
period as a "lame duck."
His decision to step down was apparently based on personal
reasons as well as his often-stated view that nobody should aspire to
serve more than one term as secretary-general. Thant had made a'
previous effort to retire in 1966 but was pursuaded to accept a second
term. I
OVER $40,000 has been given Senate and House Banking
Committee members by a fund representing the nation's bankers
in what one key legislator has called an obvious effort to in-
fluence a pending bank bill.
Rep. Wright A. Patman, (D-Tex), said yesterday the contrib-
itinn hnu bP~ dnl ofrrf nlinn+ nut r ,1 1--- I

curbs on

Nixon calls for tougher

331 Thompson-SUNDAY 7:30-12:00

Donation $1.00 or whatever you can afford.

Proceeds go to WRO, Detroit NCCF

I

The Detroit News

Murders stil

I

By JAY CARR
"Little Murders" is about
a society decomposing at
fever pitch. Our society, if
you must know. A couple of
years ago, "Little Murders"
seemed a nightmare. It's still
a nightmare, but now it's a
documentary as well. The
manic hilarity keeps snow-
balling. [If you don't laugh
at "Little Murders," which is
almost too true tobe funny,
you may start screaming,]
So you laugh, and you

keep laughing, and i
the great credit of the
Company, who stage
play as their third o
at the Lydia Mend
Theatre last night
there was a ripple of n
excitement in the lax
They have found the
tone, the right temp
smoking handle on th
ror. [This is easily th
of the three production
have given us. It can s
fidently on any stage
where.]

a scream
t is to ALL THE ACTORS are
eActors vibrating on the same plane,
ffering which surely says something
elssohn for directors Allen Fletcher
t, that and Josef Sommer's decision
nervous to serve "Little Murders" up
ughter. as a sulfuric comic strip,
perfect
Po, the Feiffer's high-pressure patch
Ze hor- of urban hell has been
he best expertly a n d disquietingly
is they brought to deadly life here.
it con- [The new Actors troupe is
e any- jelling fast and looks better
all the time.]

uuons nave een ma e to try to infuence the vote on a bill that would
bar a holding company owning a bank from branching into unrelated
fields.
* * *
BRITISH FOREIGN SECRETARY Sir Alec Douglas-Home
said yesterday that Israel should pull back from territory captur-
ed in the 1967 Middle East war in exchange for "secure and rec-
ognized boundaries" with the Arab nations.
It was the first public policy statement on the Arab-Israeli dead-
lock by Britain's Conservative government, which took office last
June and it appeared to indicate that Britain may be planning a
more active role in the search for a peace settlement in the Middle
East.

violent protest
PHOENIX, Ariz. {IP) - Warn-
ing that Americans are in
danger of losing their free-
dom to "haters," President
Nixon declared yesterday that
the time has come to take a
tough - minded approach to
violence.
The new approach, he said,
would include tougher laws, firm-
er justice in the courtroom and a
new and stern attitude by t h e
American people to deal with ter-
ror is tic dissent.
What is not needed, he declar-
ed, is repression.
Nixon's remarks, delivered to a
Republican rally at the Phoenix
airport, represented one of t h e
highlights , of his personal cam-
paign in behalf of GOP candi-
dates.
As part of what he termed "the
new approach to violence," Nix-
j..on listed three areas in which he
said changes are needed:
-"New and strong laws that
will give the peace forces n e w
muscle to deal with the criminal
forces" and the election of Con-
gressmen "who will work for the
fight for laws that will put the
terrorists where they belong -
-Associated Press not roaming around civil society,
Phoenix but behind bars;"
P nx-Judges "who have an aware-
ness of the rights of the victim
as well as the rights of the accus-
ed" and men in the Senate "who
will give those strong judges a
vote of confidence," and
p led g e -"AA new attitude on the part
ed, "Law and order are not code
h regard to my own posi- words f o r racism or repression.
ns as governor." Lawrand order' are code words
for freedom from fear. This new
lilliken, Levin's opponent, attitude means that college ad-
didates who partially sup- ministrators must stop caving in
pledge. "I agree with the to the demands of the radical few,
without reservation," he and it means that moderate stu-
dents must take a position that
Hart also supports the says to the violent: "Hit the books
is Republican opponent, or hit the road.'hd
does not.1 Referring to th e incident
m Thursday in San Jose where pro-
agon, Democratic candi- testers stoned t h e President's
from the second district, motorcade, Nixon said, "never be-
nn Arbor, responded fav- fore in this campaign was there
en Congress knows that such an atmosphere of hatred."
ganizing at the polls will And he said of his attackers,
te a new peace-directed estimated by police at about 1,000,
ie said. "Let's recognize them for what
epublican opponent, in- they are: not romantic revolution-
epubicanoppoentin- aries, but the same thugs a n d
arvin Esch, did not en- hoodlums that have always plag-
ued a good people."

Nixon speaks inI

'PEACE WORKS' PLAN
26 candidates endorse antiwar

FINAL PERFORMANCES!
2:30! and 8:00!

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

668-6300

ANN ARBOR

5

ANN ARBOR BLACK THEATRE, Inc.

By HANNAH MORRISON
'The petition is one way to pin down
candidates about how they stand on the
war issue," says coordinator Ann Oliver
of Peace Works, a moderate antiwar or-
ganization active in the current election
campaign.
During the past three weeks, Peace
Works, formerly known as the Hatfield
McGovern Petition Drive, has sent copies
of its five-point "voter's pledge" to 58
candidates for state and local office, as
well as accumulating close to 1000 signa-
tures of private citizens.
Peace Works has taken out advertise-
ments in the Ann Arbor News and The
Daily this week listing the 26 candidates
who have endorsed all five points of the
petition.

Petition signers pledge themselves to
support a publicised timetable for rapid
withdrawal of all American troops from
Indochina, an immediate end to all bomb-
ing by American planes Qf any country in
Indochina, and a drastic reduction in the
subsidization of military operations in
those countries. Signers also endorse a
substantial reduction in the use of our
taxes for military appropriations including
armaments and a much greater proportion
of taxes spent on meeting the pressing
domestic needs of our country including
law enforcement, housing, health care,
pollution control and education.
Sander Levin, the Democratic candi-
date in the gubernatorial race and one of
the major candidates to sign the petition
said, "I am happy to endorse the five points

of the pledge wit
tion and intentio
Gov. William M
is among the cand
ports the voter's1
last two points
said.
Senator Phillip
pledge, though h
Lenore Romney,c
Michael Stillwa
date for Congress
which includes Ar
orably. "Only wh
the people are or
it act to institu
foreign policy," h
Stillwagon's R
cumbent Rep. M
dorse the pledge.

PRESENTS
THREE
ONE-ACT PLAYS
"DAY OF ABSENCE"
by DOUGLAS TURNERWARD
"CONTRIBUTION"
by TED SHINE
"THE FIRST
MILITANT MINISTER"
by BEN CALDWELL
NOV. 5, 6 7--8 P.M.
Nov. 8: Matinee 2 P.M.
GENERAL PUBLIC $3.00-STUDENTS $2.00
Schorling Aud., University School.
(E. Univ. and Monroe)

.. a moment

of the age."-John Ciardi

IL
V

nikos kozentzakis
author of "zorba the greek"
THE ODYSSEY

BEST STEAK HOUSE
STEAK DINNERS
NOW SERVING
At Reasonable Prices
FILET-1.59 SIRLOIN-1.53
Above includes Baked Potato,
Salad, and Texas Toast
STEAKBURGER-.79
Includes Baked Potato and Texas Toast
217 S. STATE ST.
Next to State Theater

A MODERN SEQUEL
Kimon Friar translation

at 8 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, November 4-7
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE-Box Office opens 12:30 764-5387
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
"... one of this century's major achievements."-Mary Renault

I

11

I

Soph Show 70's

I - - -

TheSidelongGlances
of aon Kicker

I

I

IS, QUITE SIMPLY,
THE BEST AMERICAN FILM
I'VE SEEN THIS YEAR"NVincentCanby.
N. Y. TIMES
NB AAMLL IPIC !UNES oRP§ cRLf'NP A SSSBYI OPBl NW YINC PNS1 Y
nd A MIKE NICHOLS FILM
ALAN ARKIN
BA 6 A :1O I
J OS EPH HE LIER
MARTIN BALSAM, RICHARD BENJAMIN; ARTIHR ARflINIEL. JACK ILFORD; BUCK HENRY; 808 NEWHART; ANTHONY PERKINS; PAULA ]PRENTISS:
MARTINSHEEN; JON VOIGHT 9 ORSONWEYLES ASEEDLE, SCREENPLAY BY BUCK HENRY PROO&BYJOHN GAMlY &MAFIIINRANSIIHOE
IRECTEOBY MIKE NICHOLS PmUCIIONOESIC KUS:gOar TaAPNCO VIZ1- R AIAOU~!PICiURi aMR.OOk1 IPRSPAARi BAOUl0UA04U
DIAL 5-6290
SHOWS AT (~J~ILJL
1, 3,5, 7, 9:10 f

I

I

Thursday, Nov. 5 at 8 p.m.. ..
Friday, Nov. 6 at 7 and 10 p.m... .
Saturday, Nov. 7 at 7 and 10 p.m...

IS THIS WEEK!
.... ...... . . . $2.25
.............$2.50
................$2.50

''"'

Meet Jonathan.
The very day he graduated Princeton
he became a New York taxi driver.
(Then, he met Jennifer.)

General ticket sales start tomorrow
at the Mendelssohn box office, Michigan League

I

I

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE
Presents Film Maker

HALLOWEEN FESTIVAL
WED., OCT. 28: The Cat People
dir. JACQUES TOUTNER (1942)
Girl believes she turns into a cat as a result
of a curse.
THURS., FRI., OCT. 29-30:
The Day the Earth Stood Still
dir. ROBERT WISE (1951)
Michael Rennie tries to save Earthmen
from themselves.
CAT CIIJ '"r" _ 1A_ NV 1.

JAMES LIPSCOMB
showing and discussing his film
MOONEY vs. FOWLE
A cinema verite film covering two high school football coaches
r~r14 .g rm . - - .n + dn..' i e°P- . r -rr- rl- .Y.r i.., -e .....r

r:;m

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan