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October 31, 1970 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-31

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National General Theatres
FOH VILLAGE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-76943OO

SAT., OCT. 31
1 :00 P.M. ONLY

page three

94C

Sf rIt in

43 at'

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Edgar Allan Poe-Arama
House of Usher
PLUS
Pit and the Pendulum
TICKETS 75c AT DOOR
FREE SHRUNKEN HEAD

DISCOUNT TICKETS
AT THESE MERCHANTS

Saturday, October 31, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michgan Page Three

1.
2.
3.
4.

NICHOLSON MOTORCYCLE
CAMPUS BIKE & TOY
FLAMING PIT RESTAURANT
BURGER CHEF
FREE BAG OF POPCORN

news Thssbriefs
By The Associated Press

Mediator warnsGM strikers

I

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SOVIET FOREIGN MINISTER Andrei Gromyko paid ;an un-
precedented visit to West Germany Thursday in an apparent bid
to speed up ratification of the Soviet-German nonaggression
treaty.
He talked for more than six hours with Foreign Minister Walter
Scheel and left behind the impressionthat Moscow is seriously in-
terested in improving the situation in and around Berlin.
Chancellor Willy Brandt's government has made such an im-
provement a precondition to submitting for ratification the friend-
ship treaty Brandt signed in Moscow last Aug. 12.
RACIAL DISORDERS closed school systems yesterday in
Trenton, N.J., and Providence, R.I. The two cities were among
the 14 that have closed schools for similar reasons since the start
of the academic year.
A survey showed that the school closings, mostly high schools,
came from a variety of causes-from violent black-white confronta-
tions to objections to busing plans to racially-oriented protest and
boycotts.
In Trenton, looting and window breaking broke out again yes-
terday near a city monument as racial unrest continued in reaction
to a controversial school busing plan.
Providence's school system was shut down yesterday by Supt.!
Richard C. Briggs because of rock-throwing incidents Thursday near
the Central-Classical high school complex.
* * *

-0
U.S. intervention
DETROIT (M - The chief of the federal government's
Mediation and Conciliation Service said yesterday his depart-
ment would step into contract negotiations between General
Motors Corp. and the United Auto Workers unless the tempo
:". :.:_ .__:.. picks up.
pi kExpressing he Nixon administration's "tremendous in-
. '"mx terest, J. Curtis Counts said hejhad been dissatisfied with
progress thus far in efforts to end the 47-day-old strike that
has idled more than 400,000 GM workers in the United States
and Canada.
{f f :> Counts' statement came at a news conference shortly

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MONTGOMERY POLICE questioned two youths yesterday in Soviet Foreign Minister AndreiC
the killing of a student from Alabama State University that ap- man Foreign Minister Walter S
parently touched off a gunfight between campus police and a 1 foreign minister to visit West
group of unidentified persons suspected of firing the fatal shot. yesterday for talks on East-We
Officers said 19-year-old Gerald Banks of Montgomery was ar-
rested with a rifle in his possession. They said a check of records MILK MONEY:
showed the gun had been stolen, and Banks was charged with pos- I
session of stolen property. "e
A 16-year-old youth was also picked up with a shotgun and held
for questioning, police said. No charge was filed against him imme-
diately and his name was withheld.
An Alabama State University spokesman said the incident began
when a fight broke out between students and a group of non-students. T yr M co n
He said a scheduled dance had been delayed when the band failed fa r
to show up.
Officials said the campus was calm after the shooting. WASHINGTON () - A plush
* * * political fund for milk producers
NORTH VIETNAMESE troops launched their fiercest assaults has made $13,000 in campaign
on U.S. positions in more than three months yesterday but the contributions to the chairman of
worst floods in six years in South Vietnam claimed a higher death the House Agriculture Committee
toll and two other farm congressmen
U.S. officials have been expecting increased communist attacks, who are unopposed for re-election.
U.S.bee exectng icresedcomunis atack, IThe chairman, Rep. W. R. Poage
which, they claim, are aimed at attempting to influence the American (D-Tex), unopposed in Tuesday's
public to vote against candidates backed by the administration in the election after 34 years in Congress,
U.S. elections next Tuesday. received a $5,000 contribution
Army concerned about growing
drug use problems in Vietnam

-Associated Press
s to Germany
Gromyko speaks with West Ger-
cheel. Gromyko, the first Soviet
Germany, arrived in Frankfurt
est problems. (See News Briefs)

V

"THE BEN-HU-R OF THE
MOTORCYCLE PICTURES"
IT'S -Saturday Review

fund helps
ressmen
from the milk group, the Trust
for Agricultural Political Educa-
I tion.
Two freshman members of the
Agriculture Committee who also
t have races this year, Rep. Edward
Jones (D-Tenn), and Rep. Bill
Alexander (D-Ark), got other
'sizable contributions.
Milk is buoyed by government
price supports. The Trust for
Agricultural Education is a rich
new campaign fund overflowing
Swith$400,000 in donations from
dairy farmers around the nation.
Poage is the second unopposed
House chairman benefiting from
special interest funds this year.
Funds for two seamen's unions
steered $5,000 through a hidden
money-raising body set up in
Washington for Rep. Edward A.
Garmatz (D-Md), chairman of
the House Merchant Marine Com-
mittee.
The trust gave $2,000 to Jones
this summer and a total of $6,000
to Alexander over the past year
and a half. All three committee
members were unopposed in their
summer primaries as well as Tues-
day's general elections.
The campaign fund, based in'
San Antonio, Tex., was set up last
year by officials tied to Associated
Milk Producers Inc. That organ-
ization's comptroller, Robert O.
Isham, is treasurer and sole of-
ficial of the trust.
Isham said the trust makes its
contributions to farm congress-
men on the basis of need. "And,"
he said, when asked about the
unopposed members, "I've never
talked to a politician who didn't
need money."

after the two sides gave the
first indications they have de-
cided to begin serious give-
and-take bargaining on eco-
nomic issues.
GM and the UAW jointly an-
nounced a news blackout and
establishment of a special top-
level subcommittee "to undertake
intensive probing" of their differ-
ences.
Imposition of such blackouts in
the past has indicated settlement
was nearing. Counts said he was
"enthusiastic" the subcommittee
had been set up and would meet
through the weekend, but he add-
ed, "Don't let me mislead you to
think settlement is just around
the corner."
He said his office was monitor-
ing negotiations and "if this pro-
gress ceases we will get into it
actively."
Counts said he came to Detroit
of his own volition not on presi-
dential orders.
Both GM and the UAW have
said they want no outside inter-
vention, governmental or other-
wise. And only once, during a
record 119-day strike againstnGM
in 1945-46, have they permitted
a federal government representa-
tive to sit in on bargaining. He
was not allowed to participate ac-
tively, however.
Negotiations which began more
than three months ago, on July
15, broke off when the strike
erupted at midnight Sept. 14 and
were not renewed until Oct. 9.
There was no indication yester-
day that either side had backed
away from previously taken tough
stands on money and fringe issues.
Terrorists in
Brazil plan to
aid Panthers
RIO DE JANEIRO ()-Brazil-
ian terrorists planned to work to-
gether with the Black Panther
party in Algiers, according to do-
cuments published yesterday.
A letter purporting to be written
from Rome to Joaquim Camara
Ferreira, a top Brazilian terrorist
leader who died of a heart attack
last week shortly after his arrest,
said, "We. are thinking of organ-
izing a publishing house in Algiers.
It would belong to us and the
Black Panthers. Legal aims would
be publishing, illegal aims would
be to prepare documents."
The letter, signed "Claudio"
and dated Oct. 10 in Rome, re-
ported efforts by Ferreira's or-
ganziation-the National Libera-
tion Alliance (ALN)-to gather
funds and promote publicity in
Europe against Brazil's military
regime.
National General Theatres
FOX VILUMGE
375 No MAPLE RD.-7694300
DOUBLE FEATURE
COOL HAND LUKE
Mon.-Fri. 7:00
Saturday 7:25
Sunday3:00-7:25
HOTEL

Strike hits
GM-tied
inustries
By The Associated Press
The 46-day United Auto Work-
ers strike against General Motors
Corp. is taking a heavy toll in
terms of jobs and money in steel,
rubber, rail, automotive parts and
other industries that depend on
the auto industry f or much of
their revenue.
General Motors, the world's
largest company, normally spends
$40 million a day with 39,000 sup-
pliers, and averages $90 million
a day in sales.
An Associated Press survey
showed yesterday that thousands
of workers have been laid off and
that financial losses have mush-
roomed across the country.
Layoffs are mounting among
auto salesmen a n d mechanics
from Massachusetts to California.
So are pay and commission cuts
for those still working. Some steel
and rubber plants have cut back
from five-day weeks to three and
four-day weeks.
Government units are also feel-
ing the impact.
Gov. William Milliken said the
state was losing $4 million a week
in state revenue, and will have to
make budget cuts if t h e strike
goes beyond Dec. 1.
Michigan has 180,000 auto work-
ers strike-idled.
The state Department of Social
Services added that as of} 1 a s t
Tuesday applications from GM
families for federal food stamps
totaled 62,140. UAW strike fund
assistance for its members ranges
from $30 to $40 a week, depend-
ing upon family status. An income
that low, qualifies one for relief.
In addition to strikers, Michi-
gan had 232,000 or 6.5 per cent of
its 1 a b o r force on the sidelines
Sept. 30.
Cities reporting income tax
losses included Flint, $110,000 a
week; Norwood, Ohio, $15,000 a
week; and Cleveland, Ohio, $10,-
000 a week.
In Pontiac it was reported that
the strike-caused decrease in city
income taxes might force the lay-
off of 18 policemen and 14 fire-
men.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Glass postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mil
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

SAIGON (P)-The U.S. Army expressed grave
concern yesterday about an increasing number
of American servicemen killed or hospitalized by
narcotics abuse in Vietnam.
In 1970 alone, the Army announced, there have
been 25 confirmed deaths from drugs, another
64 suspected as caused by drugs and more than
700 drug-related hospital cases.
An official memorandum said the problem in-
volved not only marijuana, which always has been
abundant in South Vietnam, but narcotic drugs
such as heroin which are are addictive.
By labeling drug abuse "a matter of grave
concern," the Army shifted from a stand of two
months ago when high officials claimed the in-
crease in narcotics usage was insignificant.
The statement reported more drug-related
hospital cases and more drug-caused fatalities
so far during 1970 than in all 12 months last year.
The findings roughly correspond with those
of Sen. Thomas J. Dodd (D-Conn), who claimed
in Washington on Thursday that an Air Force

hospital in Vietnam
drugs between Aug.
Dodd was shar
military for punishi
to stop the traffic i
Dodd said the I
really know, and n
drug addiction bec
their affliction, are
dishonorable discha
ways reminiscent o
Dodd said that
military is simply r
a drug problem wit:
In addition to
being initiated, the
amnesty program a
their habit throug
habilitation. It prov
seek medical help
cotic offenders.

a had reported 83 deaths from
1 and Oct. 18.
ply critical yesterday of the
ng drug users instead of trying
in narcotics among the troops.
Defense Department "does not
nay never know, much about
ause drug addicts who admit
court-martialed or receive a
rge or are dealt with in other
f medieval for the insane."
by discharging addicts, the
releasing on the United States
h which it was unable to cope.
new drug-help programs now
Army has been operating an
imed at helping soldiers break
'h medical treatment and re-
vides that men who voluntarily
will not be punished as nar-
Join The Daily

11

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~TheDtriewsj

ThisI

Murders stil

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830

a scream

By JAY CARR
"Little Murders" is about
a society decomposing at
fever pitch. Our society, if
you must know. A couple of
years ago, "Little Murders"
seemed a nightmare. It's still
a nightmare, but now it's a
documentary as well. The
manic hilarity keeps snow-
balling. [If you don't laugh
at "Little Murders," which is

keep laughing, and it is to
the great credit of the Actors
Company, who staged the
play as their third offering
at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre last n i g h t, that
there was a ripple of nervous
excitement in the laughter.
They have found the perfect
tone, the right tempo, the
smoking handle on the hor-
ror. [This is easily the best
of the three productions they

ALL THE ACTORS are
vibrating on the same plane,
which surely says something
for- directors Allen Fletcher
and Josef Sommer's decision
to serve "Little Murders" up
as a sulfuric comic strip.
Feiffer's high-pressure patch
of urban hell has been
expertly a n d disquietingly
brought to deadly life here.

OWEN

McBRIDE
IRISH pub songs
and ballads

° NEAR
Ob MMAX 'MOO 7.ARBRA AND OUM
BMRAS~lE &M W~iul~rl~lir/ip TMUAND WAITER SING
MICHAELCRAWFOMRD 4- S RETSNS
suti CI t ORni'enh~u~f W ~',7 TJtLm Eurth * To Me

i

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-AftU

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