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October 30, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"THE BEN-HUR OF THE
MOTORCYCLE PICTURES"
IT'S -Saturday Review
JOE
as CC.Ryder
as his girl p
laving, brawling and bsiitu:.

page three

C14C

Sicigri~an

Itait

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Friday, October 30, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michgan Page Three

I

news briefs
By The Associated Press

m

ANN ARBOR

CIVIC THEATRE
proudly presents its 41 st season
"MAN OF LA MANCHA" Dec. 16-20
"SUBJECT WAS ROSES" Mar. 3-6
"BLITHE SPIRIT" Mar. 31-Apr. 3
"IN WHITE AMERICA" Apr. 21-24

THE TWO U.S. GENERALS whose light plane came down in
the Soviet Union last week spent their eighth day in detention
yesterday with no immediate hope of release.
In Moscow, the American charge d'affairs made another approach,
the embassy's seventh, to the Soviet foreign ministry in an attempt to
secure the release of the generals. The Russians gave no indication
that the men would be released within the forseeable future.
Meanwhile, in Washington, the U.S. government delivered a pro-
test to Soviet ambassador Anatoly F. Dobrynin accusing his govern-
ment of breaching the consular convention existing between the U.S.
and U.S.S.R.
* *
AMERICAN BATTLE DEATHS in Indochina fell below fifty
for the fourth time this week.
The U.S. command in South Vietnam says that this is the first;
time that deaths have been so low for so long.I
The command said that 43 Americans were killed in action while
279 were wounded.
The latest casualties raised to 43,904 the number of Americans
killed in the Indo-China wars.
South Vietnamese deaths now stand at 115,087 killed while the;
allies claim to have killed 678,601 North Vietnamese and Vietcong
soldiers.
THE UNITED STATES CALLED yesterday for a 90 day
extension of the Mideast cease-fire and for steps to restore con-
fidence so that the stalemated peace talks can continue.
The U.S. proposal came in a resolution presented to the United-
Nations General Assembly by Charles W. Yost, American ambassador!
to the multi-nation body. ;
Yost was critical of the resolution presented to the, General As-
sembly Wednesday by 19 non-aligned and Communist nations which
called for a withdrawal of Israeli troops from the occupied territories.
SALVADOR ALLENDE, president elect of Chile, said at a
news conference yesterday that he would not introduce com-
munism into Chile.I
Allende, who will officially take office next Tuesday, declared,
thtat his government would reflect the common purpose of the sixI
party Poular Unity coalition.
Chile's communist party is regarded as the dominant force in n
the coalition.a
Allende also announced the nationalization of foreign ownedu
companies, "within the framework of the law," and without, "a mo- r
tive of revenge."

-Associated Press

Nixon demonstrates'

Guerrillas
angry at
Hussein
BEIRUT, Lebanon (A) - Guer-
rilla leader Yasir Arafat, reacting
angrily to the appointment of a
new premier by King Hussein of
plain to Arab leaders, diplomats
said yesterday.
Jordan's new Prime Minister,
Wasfi Tell, replaces. Palestinian
Ahman Toukan, named only three
weeks ago.
Tell, who has been called "a
known agent of the U.S. Central
Intelligence Agency" by Al Baya,
an official Syrian newspaper, also
announced his intention of going
to Cairo, to hold talks with Egyp-
tian leaders on closer cooperation
against Israel.
In a statement in which Tell
sought to wipe out his image of
being a f o e of the Palestinian
guerrillas, th a t his government
"will go to far lengths in estab-
lishing closer cooperation with my
Fedayeen brothers."
He also promised to adhere to
the "letter and spirit" of the Cai-
ro peace agreement, which, Tell
said, was the late President Gamel
Abdel Nasser's, "last political will
and testament to the Arab world."
Observers of the Mid-East in
Beirut say that Tell's trip is de-
signed to dispel the shock with
which the news of his appoint-
ment was greeted in Cairo.
The semi-official Cairo news-
paper Al Ahram has called the ap-
pointment a "grave political de-
velopment."
It seems that Arafat will tell
Cairo that there will be a renewal
of trouble in Jordan if Hussein
cannot be persuaded to_ remove
Tell.
Egypt is one of the guarentors
of the peace agreement between
Hussein and the Fedayeen that
ended the civil war in Jordan last
month.
The other nations responsible
for overseeing the cease-fire are
the Sudan and Libya.
Diplomatic sources indicate that
Arafat is holding the three re-
sponsible for seeing that the
agreement is kept.

The President gives the "V" sign to a group of anti-war demonstrators in Rochester, Minn. yester-
day. The President was in Rochester campaigning for Republican Clark MacGregor, former Vice
President Hubert Humphrey's opponent in the U.S. Senate race.
AFL-CIO LEADER SPEAKS:
Meany urges votes for liberals,
supports national health plan

"THE BRASS AND GRASS FOREVER"
(an original musical)

May 5-9

DON'T DELAY--ORDER YOUR SEASON TICKETS TODAY
(Use This Coupon)

NAME

PHONE _

ADDRESS

CITY

.ZIP

4II T.

WASHINGTON (AP) -AFL-CIO
President George Meany urged
voters yesterday to elect congres-
sional candidates who favor a
national health insurance plan
and other legislation to benefit
workers and consumers.
Meany, in a paid political CBS
radio broadcast, said President
Nixon and conservative candi-

Please reserve sets of season tickets, as indicated below.
I have enclosed $ . I understand the tickets will be
mailed to me in the fall. I have enclosed a self-addressed, stamp-
ed envelope.

*Wed. balcony
*Wed. orchestra
*Thurs. balcony
*Thurs. orchestra

$7.00
9.00
7.00
9.00

BACK IN 4 DAYS
Leary vows return to U.S.

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY SEASON TICKETS
NO LONGER AVAILABLE
*Best seat selection available for these performances.
MAIL TO P.O. BOX 1993, ANN ARBOR, MICH. 48106
662-9405

"THE MOST SWEEPING AND
PAINFULLY ACCURATE
INDICTMENT OF THE AMERICAN
MIDDLE CLASS EVER PUT
ON FILM!"
-SUSAN STARK, DETROIT FREE PRESS
"'JOE' MUST SURELY RANK IN
IMPACT WITH 'BONNIE AND CLYDE'!"
-TIME MAGAZINE
'I
IS A RIP-SNORTER. A TRIUMPH!"-Judith Crist
"'****BRILLIANTLY CONCEIVED,
BRILLIANTLY DONE! DEVASTATINGLY FUNNY!"
-Kathleen Carroll, New York Daily News

CAIRO (P) - Dr. Timothy
Leary, fugitive from a California
prison, said yesterday he will
enter the United States in dis-
guise within the next few days
to attend a Black Panther meet-
ing in New Haven, Conn.
Leary spoke to newsmen
shortly before boarding an Air
Algeria plane .for Algeria after
being refused entrance into
Egypt. He 'was expelled from
Lebanon earlier this week.
"I will be in the United States
by the third of November," he
said. I will enter the United
States, disguised, to attend a
big demonstration in New Hav-
en in support of Bobby Seale and
Ericka Huggins."
Seale, national chairman of
the Black Panther party, and
Mrs. Huggins are being h a 1 d

without bond awaiting trial in
New Haven in the slaying of
Alex Rackley, another Panther.
Seale is charfged with murder
and Mrs. Hugins is charged with
kidnaping resulting in death
and with aiding and abetting in
murder.
A Panther rally is scheduled
for Nov. 3 in New Haven in sup-
port of Seale and Mrs. Huggins.
Leary declared he would elude
American officials in entering
the United States just as he
eluded them in his recent escape
from prison at San Luis Obispo,
Calif., where he was serving a
sentence on a narcotics charge.
"There will be many sur-
prises that day and the Amer-
ican government, which was
surprised to see me escape, will
be more surprised this time

about who will be there in New
Haven."
Leary was traveling with an
American passport made out in
the name of William McNellis.
He showed it to reporters and
said the Black Panthers had
provided him with it.
He was traveling with t h r e e
others including Field Marshal
Donald Cox, of the Black Pan-
thers. The two others were iden-
tified as Martin Kenner a n d
Jennifer Dohrn, a sister of Ber-
nardine Dohrn, a fugitive on the
FBI "10 most wanted persons"
list.
Miss Dohrn identified herself
as a member of the Youth Inter-
national aPrty - Yippies. She
said Bernardine had played an
important role in Leary's escape
from the United States to Al-
geria.

dates oppose a national health
plan.
"The conservatives who are
seeking your vote, and the admin-
istration say 'no,'" Meany said.
They say America cannot afford
a first-class, comprehensive sys-
tem of health care for all its peo-
ple. We say America can afford
nothing less," added the 76-year-
old leader of the 13.6-million
member labor federation.
"That same argument has been
used in opposition to full employ-
ment, industrial safety laws, a
higher minimum wage, consumer
protection, clean air, clean water,
better schools, reasonable interest
rates.
"On all these issues, we are
again told: America can't afford
them," Meany continued. "Amer-
ican can afford them - all of
them."
Meany urged voters to support
"forward-looking" candidates who
will support such programs in
Congress. The AFL-CIO backs
mostly Democratic candidates and
some liberal Republicans.
"Most union members have
some kind of medical insurance,
won by their unions at the bar-
gaining table. But even that ex-
pensive insurance sometimes pays
only a third of the cost of health
care. And one American in four
has no insurance at all.
"We believe the finest medical
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michligan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscriptionorates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by main
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

care on earth should be available
to rich and-poor, black and white,
young and old, employed and un-
employed alike," he said.
Meany said action is needed al-
so to spur economic growth.
"What America cannot afford is
to do nothing-to slip backward,
as we have been doing the last
two years under the pres.ent ad-
ministration in Washington," he
said.
"So, my message to workers is
this: cast your ballot as if your
job, your health,, your pocketbook
and your family's future depended
on it. They really do. They are
what is at stake in this election."

SACRAMENTO, Calif. ()-Gov.
Ronald Reagan said Thursday
that armed military policemen
from the California National
Guard have been assigned to
guard state officials because of
general threats of attacks by rad-
icals.
Reagan, a Republican seeking
reelection this Tuesday, said the
protection was also offered to
campaign opponents of the state
officials, but he did not know if
any had accepted it. He would
give no details of what security
precautions had been taken or how
many guardsmen are involved.
Reagan said the action was
taken in response to g e n e r a l
threats of violence at election time
by revolutionaries.
Asked if he took such threats

seriously, Reagan said "I think in
the job I have I'd be a darn fool
not to."
He did not elaborate.
Reports circulated in the Cap-;
itol Wednesday that National
Guard military policemen in civil-
ian clothes and armed with .45'
caliber pistols were guarding some
key state officials. Which ones
wasn't disclosed.
Reagan was asked about the
reports at the news conference.
The question dealt with protection
on election night, but Ed. Meese,
the governor's executive secretary,
later said "emergency planning is
going on now." He would not say
whether guardsmen actually are
traveling with state officers and
candidates now.

Guardsmen to protect
California officials

11

The Detroit News
Murders still a scream

By JAY CARR

"Little Murders" is about
a society decomposing at
fever pitch. Our society, if
you must know. A couple of
yearsago, "Little Murders"
seemed a nightmare. It's still
a nightmare, but now it's a
documentary as well. The
manichilaritykeeps snow-
balling. [If you don't laugh
at "Little Murders," which is
almost too true to be funny,
you may start screaming.]
So you laugh, and you

keep laughing, and it is to
the great credit of the Actors
Company, who staged the
play as their third offering
at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre last n i g h t, that
there was a ripple of nervous
excitement in the laughter.
They have found the perfect
tone, the right tempo, the
smoking handle on the hor-
ror. [This is easily the best
of the three productions they
have given us. It can sit con-
fidently on any stage any-
iwhere.]

ALL THE ACTORS are
vibrating on the same plane,
which surely says something
for directors Allen Fletcher
and Josef Sommer's decision
to serve "Little Murders" up
as a sulfuric comic strip.
Feiffer's high-pressure patch
of urban hell has been
expertly a n d disquietingly
brought to deadly life here.
[The new Actors troupe is
jelling fast and looks better
all the time.]

411__l JAIVEV

Tonight thru Sun. Eve. & Sun. Mat.
ENDELSSOHN THEATRE 668-6300 ANN ARB

Ml

DR

DIAL-5-6290 __________
YOU SEE IT FOR THE FIRST'
@0EVERY TIME YOU SEE 1
-.
"'CATCH-22' IS / "CATCH
THE MOST MOVING, dandia
MOST INTELLIGENT,
THE MOST HUMANE- I.x
OH, TO HELL WITH IT! _"DIRECTOR
HAS CREAT
-IT'S THE BEST 4;ART!"
AMERICAN
FILM I'VE "'CATCH-22'
SEEN THIS that need toI
EEA TI again! Alan
ance as Yoss
-Vincent Canby, N. Y. Times -Jos

DOORS OPEN
AT 12:45
SHOWS AT
3, 5, 7 and 9:10
TIME

III

-

I

I

ARM/American Revolutionary Media presents

_ __N'

H-22' is hard as a
f, cold to the touch
iant to the eye!"
-TIME MAGAZINE
MIKE NICHOLS
TED A WORK OF
-David Goldman, CBS Radio
says many things
be said again and
Arkin's perform-
arian is great!"
*ph Morgenstern, NEWSWEEK

Jean-Luc Godard's
A Woman is a Woman

11

with

DENNIS FRIEDLAND AND CHRISTOPHER C. DEWEY PRESENT A CANNON PRODUCTION
STARRING PETER BOYLE AND DENNIS PATRICK IN"JOE" WITH AUDREY CAIRE
SUSAN SARANDON- K. CALLAN -PAT MCDERMOTT- MUSIC COMPOSED AND
:CONDUCTED BY BOBBY SCOTT- EDITED BY GEORGE T NORRIS- WRITTEN BY
1 NORMAN WEXLER + PRODUCED BY DAVID GIL- DIRECTED BY JOHN G. AVILDSEN
!COLOR BY DELUXE- Original Sound Track Album avalable on Mercury Records -4*vs
A CANNON RELEASE

Anna
Jean-Paul

Karina
Belmondo

in COLOR

INlRD1 15.1 rcGrIIA1 D7r AIMKIrD Ill U

i

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