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October 29, 1970 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-29

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Page ;Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 29, 1970

.,

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, October 29, 1970

.. ., 'WI

It has been shown that a simple, inexpensive tune-up can reduce
carbon ;monoxide and hydracarbon exhaust by as much as 50%
on most cars .. .
FREE TUNE-UP
The I College of Engineering and The Society of Automotive
Engineers will perform free tune-ups to as many cars as possible,
and will conduct tours of the Exhaust Emission Research Facilities
at the Auto Lab.
SAT., OCTOBER 31-8 a.m.-5 p.m.
AUTO LAB-NORTH CAMPUS
PARTS WILL BE AVAILABLE AT A DISCOUNT
Please note: We can not help cars with maior mechanical prob-
lems (oil burners) or new cars (less 5,000 miles). We would
prefer not to work on air-conditioned cars.
It's Out now!
1970w71
STUDENT DIRmECTO YTa
CONTAINS LISTING OF:
(1) Students, their majors and home address
(2) Student organizations
(3) Dormitory nos. and RD's ONLY
(4) Sororities and fraternities
(5) Much, much, more -
WILL BE ON SALE O N THE DIAG
FRIDAY, OCT. 30th, and
MONDAY, NOV. 2nd
Published by A.P.O.

Gridde Pickings

I

Wolverines

rush

upwards

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
"We're not looking past this game" said Libel coach Eric "the
red" Siegel, "granted our game next week against the Ann Arbor
Police is the highlight of the season, nevertheless them uac muggers
could give us a lot of trouble."
On the sidelines Wolverine coach Bo Schembechler quitely ap-
plauded his pupil's modest understatement, he had learned well he
thought.
CHAPTER FIFTEEN
In preparation for this Sunday's laugh-in, Siegel is putting the
team through a rigorous daily workout. "I know it's rough on some
of the newer boys, but they still aren't snorting right," he sniffed.
CHAPTER SIXTEEN
"Those creampuffs," wretched mad dog Hertz, "they can't even
get their gridde picks to the Daily by 12 midnight Friday!"
If you want a chance at a delectable Cottage Inn pizza, and the
eternal gratitude of Hertzy, have YOUR picks in by the Friday
midnight deadline.

1. MICHIGAN at Wisconsin,
pick score
2. Iowa at Minnesota
3. Northwestern at Ohio State
4. Illinois at Purdue
5. Michigan State at Indiana
6. Cornell at Columbia
7. West Virginia at Penn State
8. Georgia Tech at Duke
9. Auburn at Florida
10. South Carolina at Georgia
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
Medium" and "Dutchman," A r e n a
Theatre, Frieze Bldg., 4:10 p.m.
ReIigious Affairs Seminar: "Toward
An Understanding of Homosexuality,"
Guild House, 802 Monroe St., 7 p.m.
conductor, guest
University Philharmonia: J. Blatt,
conductor, guest artists B. Dexter,
piano; G. Rosseels, violin, J. Jelinek,
cello: Hill Aud., 8 p.m.
Professional Not ices
Professional Theatre Program: "Little

11. North Carolina State at
Kentucky
12. Tulane at Vanderbilt
13. Nebraska at Colorado
14. Missouri at Kansas State
15. Baylor at TCU
16. Air Force at Arizona
17. California at Southern
California
18. Oregon State at Stanford
19. Dartmouth at Yale
20. Daily Libels vs. Muggers
Murders," Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre,
8 p.m.
General Notices
December Teacher's Certificate Can-
didates: All requirements for teacher's
certificate must be completed by Nov.
16;, teacher's oath should be taken soon
as possible in rm. 2000 Sch. of Educa-
tion; Placement Office material can be
obtained from that office in the SAB.
Placement Service
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICES
212 S.A.B., Lower Level
Applications for Summer Jobs in Fed-
eral Agencies can be picked up at
S.P.S.; first exam in Jan., applic. due
in Washington Dec. 4.

By KEN COHN
After Michigan's performance
against Minnesota, both the Wol-
verine offensive and defensive
platoons are ranked among the
nations best.
As a result of the 414 yards
rolled up on the ground against
the Gophers, the Michigan offense
now ranks 11th in the rushing of-
fense category, with a 252.8 yard
per game average. At the same
time, the defense, which allowed a
measly 69 ground yards last Sat-
urday, improved their average to
95.2 yards per game, and moved
up from 13th to eighth among the
rushing defense leaders.
Texas moved past Ohio State
to lead the first category with 384
ground yards a game, while
Louisiana State maintained their
place in the defensive category,
allowing only 47.2 rushing yards
each contest.
Despite giving up more points
against Minnesota than their pre-
vious average, the Wolverine de-
fense moved up a notch to eighth
in the points-scored-against rank-
ings, with a norm of 9.2 a game.
Toledo leads this category with a
stingy five-point per contest mark.
Paul Staroba is Michigan's only
individual representative among
the leaders, placing 15th among
the nation's punters with a 41-
yard per kick pace to trail Utah's
Mary Bateman.
Oregon remained the most prol-
fic passing team, running up 285.9
aerial yards per game, while San
Diego State has been the toughest
team to pass against, only giving
up an average of 79.2 yards
through the air.
Notre Dame has piled up 533.4
yards a game to lead in total of-
fense, while San Diego State leads
in total defense with a 167-yard
average. Arkansas has rolled up
42 points a game to lead in team
scoring.
In the total offense category,
Stanford's Jim Plunkett swept in-
to a large lead, now producing 277
yards each game. Air Force's Bob
Parker, Auburn's Pat Sullivan, and
Notre Dame's Joe Theismann fol-
low close behind, all having better
than 250-yard averages.
Gary Kosins of Dayton, who had
trailed Cornell's Ed Marinaro by
a large margin, took over the
(Paid Political Adv.)
Dear Congressman,
With tomorrow lies the
future. Feel left out?
-Stillwagon

rushing lead, averaging 170.5 yards
a contest. Marinaro is rushing for
a 162-yard average.
In the passing categories, Parker
has thrown for 1794 yards in
seven games, while UCLA's Dennis
Dummit has produced 1639 yards
in the same number of contests.
Notre Dame's Tom Gatewood main-
tained his pass receiving leader-
ship without having played last
week, averaging almost nine com-
pletions and 136 yards a game.
Kosins also maintained his scor-
ing leadership, averaging 16 points
a game to lead all players.
Among the Wolverines, Billy
Taylor is the leading rusher with
544 yards, twice as many as Don
Moorhead or Preston Henry, who
have 258 and 241 yards respective-
ly. Moorhead has completed 49
out of 117 passes from 622 yards,
while Paul Staroba has caught 21
passes for 261 yards, ahead of
Glenn Doughty with 10 tosses for
142.
Taylor is the leading scorer with
seven touchdowns, while Fritz Sey-
ferth has five. Mike Taylor leads
the defensive platoon in tackles,
having taken part in 58, while
Marty Huff and Tom Darden lead
in interceptions with five each.

-Daily-Jim Judkis
MICHIGAN'S DEFENSE stops a hapless Minnesota runner. Plays
like this enabled the Wolverines to move up from ninth to eighth
in scoring defense and in overall defense from 13th to eighth.

0

SIMPSON STOLEN:
Pro thefts scramble Spartans

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NOVEMBER 4,1970

By AL SHACKELFORD
(Second in a series)
"We've been decimated by the
pros."
Sossays Michigan State bas-
ketball coach Gus Ganakas of
the recent catastrophe which
befell his team: both superstar
Ralph Simpson and Tim Bog-
rakos were snatched away from
East Lansing by pro teams.
The Denver Rockets, notor-
ious for grabbing Spencer Hay-
wood f r o m the University of
Detroit, signed Simpson in a
much-publicized move and thus
took the 27.7 points a g a m e
guard away from the unlucky
Spartans.
Bograkos, another g u a r d,
whose Flint Central team lost
to Simpson and Detroit Per-
shing in the 1967 Michigan;
schoolboy state finals, signed a
contract with the N e w York
Mets. Bograkos played outfield
and first base for the Spartan
baseball team.
So Michigan State is faced
with the problem of replacing
its starting backcourt, a prob-
lem Ganakas sees as his team's
"big minus."

Ganakas will move 6-3 Rudy
Benjamin, who scored at a
steady 12.5 clip last year, into
the backcourt along with 6-2
P a t Miller. Miller totaled 3.7
points a game last season from
a forward post and isn't ex-
pected to have too much trouble
making the transition to t h e
backcourt.
Additional backcourt depth
will come from senior Paul
Dean, junior Gary Przbylo and
sophomore Gary Ganakas. Prz-
bylo missed the 1969-70 season
because of a foot injury.
Ganakas, the coach's son, will
be the smallest player in the
conference this year at 5-7 and
sparked State's freshman team
to an upset win over Michigan's
potent Baby Blue last year.
The Spartans' front line will
be bolstered by 6-7 sophomore
Bill Kilgore, who was ineligible
last year due to his failing a
business school course. Kilgore
came to East Lansing as a
much-heralded schoolboy star
from the River Rouge basket-
ball factory and is expected to
establish himself as one of the
top sophs in the Big Ten.
From what Ganakas calls "a

sleeper freshman t e a m" come
Brian Breslin, a, 6-6 forward
from East Lansing High, and
6-8 Jeff Vanderlinde. The two
will battle for a spot in a front
line manned by Kilgore and re-
turning forward Ron Gutkowski.
Gutkowski, f r o m Detroit
Catholic Central, averaged about
nine points a game for State
last year but has the potential
to become a big scorer if he
plays all the time.
"We've got some size," com-
ments Ganakas, adding that
last year's squad was "small
and slow." State's starting line-
up should average about 6-5.
Ganakas doesn't see his Spar-
tans challenging the cream of
the Big Ten (whom he charact-
erizes as Indiana, Illinois, Pur-
due ,Minnesota, and Michigan)
and calls the schedule "murder-
ous."
"The Big Ten is as good as it
has been in many years," says
Ganakas. If this is so, the Spar-
tan's hopes for the first divis-
ion are miniscule, but if the
sophomores in the froft ii n e
mature fast, State could give
the Big Ten leaders some head-
aches later in the year.

#i

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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING-Engineering or me-
chanical maintenance departments of steel plants, fabri-
cating works, mining operations, and shipyards. Fuel
and combustion departments. Supervision of production
operations. Marine engineering assignments in Ship-
building Department. Also: Sales or Research.
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING-Metallurgical .de-
partments of steel plants and manufacturing operations.
Engineering and service divisions. Technical and super-
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mills. Also: Research or Sales.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS-Technical and supervisory
positions in coke works, including production of by-
product chemicals. Fuel and combustion departments,
including responsibility for operation and maintenance
of air and water pollution control equipment. Engineer-
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INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING-Positions in steel plants,
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OTHER TECHNICAL DEGREES-Every year we recruit
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