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October 25, 1970 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-25

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Sunday,.October 25, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Sunday, October 25, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

., ,, i

ATTENTION
SOPH., JR., and SR. GIRLS
PRACTICE FOR M CHEERLEADING
TRYOUTS BEGIN
MON., OCT. 26-7:00
Waterman 'Gymnasiurm
TRYOUTS-NOV. 2

HAYDEN vs. FERENCY
THURSDAY, OCT. 29
"Strategies for Changing
America"

Urban schools linked
.s
to municipal projects

I

WASHINGTON (IP) - The con-
cept of combining schools w i t h
such facilities as housing, office
space and parking garages could
ease the financial woes of urban
school systems, according to a new
educational study.
The report on this concept -
known as joint occupancy - add-
ed that it might be especially
helpful for school systems which
need new facilities but have a

How busy peopleNAE
earn better grades

constituency unwilling
new bonds or taxes.

to voteI

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The report, written for the non-
profit Educational Facilities lab-
oratories by Evans Clinchy of
Boston, outlines the approaches
used in Pontiac, Mich., Philadel-
phit, New York, Boston a n d
Chicago to meet inner city school,
housing and urban renewal prob-
lems.
Both public and private schools
have used variations of the joint
occupancy approach to continue
educational plants in high c o s t
land areas, states the Ford Foun-
dation-funded report.
Pontiac began planning, in
1966 an inner city project that
will combine a school with other
foris of community and cultural
services and be called the Human
Resources Center.
The Center's primary function
is to provide elementary educa-
tion for about 2,000 children. But
it also will house a variety of civil
and social functions and agencies,
such as the county health a n d
mental health groups, the Urban
League, the Office of Economic
Opportunity, the local community
college and recreational and soc-
ial organizations.
Much like the Pontiac projects
is the Quincy School complex in
Boston, which Clinchy writes, is
planning an entire environment
around a new elementary school.
New York City is usually slow
to make innovations in education-
al facilities, Clinchy writes, but,
"it rose eagerly at the chance to
reduce the cost of building schools
with income derived from the pri-
vate part of joint-occupancy pro-
jects."
New York's P.S. 99 is an ex-
ample. Built during the depression,
P.S. 99 never had an auditorium
or cafeteria although land was
available. With help of a new law,
a $1 million gym-auditor~urn-cafe-
teria-community facility will be
built with 224 upper-i n c o m e
apartments above it.

Bernadette Devlin, newly freed from a jail sentence for participa-
tion in riots, waves to supporters in a small N. Ireland yillage
yesterday. Devlin urged her supporters to stop rioting for civil
rights and to work for them in other ways.
GOVT. PROBE
reshness of store
food to be studied

Bernadette's back

Lim
0

One of the best substitutes for a Swedi h blonde
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$60
r

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The Contact Lens
Wearers Solution to
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will redeem this 25G coupon plus postage. Coupon void where
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Sponsored by ti

-he Ecumenical Campus Center

II

WASHINGTON M)-The federal
government has reluctantly agreed
to study what happens when food
on grocery shelves is dated for
freshness, the head of a House
consumer panel said yesterday.
Rep. Benjamin Rosenthal (D-
N.Y.) who has been urging such
a study for months, said the Agri-
culture Department will begin ear-
ly next month to monitor a food-
dating program being started vol-
untarily by the big Jewel super-
market chain in Chicago.
Rosenthal said that Jewel plans
to stamp dates on such perishable
items as meat, poultry, dairy pro-
ducts and baked foods to show
when they are old.
Rosenthal said the study would
give Congress information to de-
cide whether to require such dat-
ing by law. the government has
never undertaken such a study, he
said.{

Agriculture marketing special-
ists will be looking to see how
much attention shoppers actual-
ly pay to the dates, how they like
the idea, how much over-age foodt
is wasted, what condition it is in
when pulled from shelves and how
much it costs to run a food-dating
program.
Some state and local govern-
ments require by law that certain
food products such as milk carry
freshness dates, but there is no
such federal requirement. The
Jewel program apparently will
cover a far wider range of foods
than any other.
Opponents of open food dating
- chiefly food packagers and
supermarket owners-say it would
add to food prices and increase
waste by prompting shoppers to
pass up perfectly acceptable items
for those a .day or so fresher.

Ile.

p

Lis

THE INDOCHINA WAR:
Alternatives for the Future
PROF. DAVID WURFEL
Univ. of Ontario
(4 months in S.E. Asia, Summer, 1970)
7:30 P.M. --SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25
First Presbyterian Church, 1432 Washtenaw

'U

310 S. STATE STREET
Open Monday & Friday Nite 'ti1 8:30

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Miss J joins the tweedy
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BLACK RELIGIOUS
EXPERIENCE
(SIX WEEK SEMINAR)
I. THE HISTORICAL BEGINNINGS
a.-Religion in Africa
b-Black Religion in the New World
II. THE BLACK CHURCH IN AMERICA
Ill. THE STOREFRONT CHURCH
IV. BLACK THEOLOGY
V. WARREN: Styles of Black Preaching.
(KING)
CLEAGE: Black Power and
Christianity
CONE: Black Theology and the
Renewal of the Church
The seminar will be led by Victor Wallin currently enrolled in the
School of Social Work and working with the Office of Religious
Affairs. He holds a graduate degree from Andrew's University in

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