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October 24, 1970 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-24

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAISY

Saturday, October 24, 1970

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, October 24, 1970

NOV. HEARINGS:
TF union seeks 'U'
recognition as agent

Angela Davis: Black

revolutionary heroine

11/0

(Continued from Page 1)
Smith says he agrees teaching
fellows should participate in and
discuss departmental policy but he
adds "Teaching fellows shouldn't
be able to vote on the develop-
ment of departmental teaching
staffs, because of their short term
status and dual nature." Smith
says, however, that "teaching fel-
lows don't need votes on commit-
tees to be influential."
TFU is presently in the midst
of a membership drive. Hayford
says the organization, formed in
Oct. 1969, hopes to strengthen its
bargaining position by it enlarging
its membership.
Hayford says she does not rule
out the possibility of a strike if
the eventual union bargaining de-
mands are not met. However, she
says, "I think a strike would only
be used in extreme cases."
University teaching fellows, most
of whom are not TFU members,
express different opinions on the
value of the union.
Descoteaux, a teaching fellow in
the French department, says she
joined the TFU because, "I think
teaching fellows should band to-
gether to improve their situation.
Acting as individuals isn't nearly
as effective."
But sociology teaching fellow
John Entin, who is not a union
member, says he is "skeptical
about the unior ." He says he
doesn't want teaching fellows to
develop into "an interest group
opposed to undergraduate stu-
dents." Entin says his main con-
cern is "the quality of undergrad-
uate education, and how teaching
fellows can add to it."
Descoteaux says, however, the
union, "wants to help students
too, not just ourselves." She says
giving teaching fellows autonomy
in the classroom, for example, "will
benefit students by making their
classes more responsive to their
needs and desires."
The total number of teaching
'fellowships available may be re-
duced in the future if department
chairmen follow a suggestion from
President Robben Fleming to "re-
turn faculty members to the un-
derclass program" at the Univer-
sity.
Fleming made the suggestion in
his State of the University address
Sept. 28. He said in most cases
"the graduate teaching fellow can-
not equal the senior faculty mem-
ber" in teaching competence.
However, there will be no re-
duction in. fellowships in the next
,school year, Smith says. In fact,
J
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he says there will probably be a
slight increase.
Even if there is a reduction in
teaching fellowships, the admin-
istration probably won't come into
conflict with the TFU if it handles
the reductions to the satisfaction
of the union.1
Hayford says most teaching fel-
lows probably "wouldn't mind see-
ing ourselves abolished" under two
conditions.,
She says that first, graduate
students who are now teaching
fellows and those who entered
graduate school on the assumption
that they would receive teachin
fellowships would have to receive
equivalent financial assistance in
other forms.
Second, small recitation classes
would have to be continued in ;ii-
troductory courses. Hayford says.
most union members believe the
recitation sections are benefic'1
to students.
Kent rally
speakers hit
indictments
(Continued from Page 1)
"And please," he said, "I see
you wearing these 'Keep Kent
Open' buttons. But Kent isn't
open now because no non-students
are allowed on the campus."
The trend of national interest
was indicated by the many tele-
grams and letters of support from
students at the universities around
the country. A letter read at the
rally from Joseph Rhodes, member
of the President's Commission on
Campus Unrest, praised the stu-
dents for "their restraint" that
had "astounded the nation."
"You've got to keep people polit-
ically conscious here," said Jef-
ferson. "Everyone is looking at
Kent. You are leading and trying
to communicate with these people
and all students support you in
your struggle."
For the student body:
DENIM
FLARES
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CHECKMATE
State St. at Liberty

(Continued from Page 1)
with her father after graduation
from Brandeis. He had stopped
to buy a bottle of liquor in Chat-
tanooga, Tenn., t h e last "wet"
city en route to Birmingham.
When they crossed the Georgia
line her father w a s stopped,
searched, fined $50 and held for a
time in jail. "She said she be-
lieved we Negroes would all be put
in concentration camps," her fa-
ther said.
There were her years of tute-
lage by Herbert Marcuse, philos-
opher of the New Left, and bM
Theodore Adorno, the shining
light of the Frankfurt school oil
Marxism. Marcuse pronounced
her the brightest student he ever
taught.
There was the chaining a ni d
gagging of Black Panther leader
Bobby Seale in a Chicago court-
room and the shackeling of the,
defendants in the Soledad prison
murder case. "Completely out.-
rageous," Angela Davis t o 1 d an
Associated Press reporter, "com-
pletely against what this country
allegedly stands for."
Angela Davis's own, words seem
to indicate her political turning
point was some time early this
year and that it was a gradual
process; she herself said there was
no precise moment when she
adopted a totally revolutionary
stance.
A year previous to the Soledad
prison case Angela Davis had told'
a group of students at San Diego
State College:

"As a Communist I have to seek
radical change and as I see ?t
capitalism does not contain the
solution to our problems today.
Capitalism can provide only a
token way of solving problems.
People are beginning to wake ur
to the fact that we have to talk
about radical solutions."
And just before the Soledad
case:
"The first condition of freedom
is the open act of resistance.
Physical resistance. Violent re-
sistance. The road toward free-
dom, the path of liberation, is
marked by resistance at every
crossroad."
And just after the Soledad case:
"We have to talk about going
into the streets but this time we
have to talk about going with the
masses of people, with the millions
of people, and demanding our
rights. Because if we do not do
this at tis point . . . then I think
we can very well talk about an
era of fascism coming into being.
It's up to us. It's our responsibility
to prevent this from coming about.
OCTOBER 22-24
A Fresh Idea
" In Communication
CHAUTAUQUA
ARRIVES
Residential College Aud.
8 P.M.

(

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