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October 24, 1970 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-24

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Page Eight

THE MICHJGAN DAILY

Saturday, October 24, 1970

of

Page Eight THE MICHiGAN DAILY Saturday, October 24, 1970

I

Stanford

leads

Rose

race

CORRECTION !
campus
interviews

for

BETHLEHEM STEEL

will be held on

NOVEMBER 4

For full details see ad in Wed., Oct. 21 issue or
contact the Placement Office.

lq

By JOHN PAPANEK
If you love those great college
football games where great powers
take each other on in a blood-
and-guts battle for Rose Bowls,
Orange Bowls, or what have you,
then ignore college football this
week.
Scanning the top ranked teams,
exluding the Big Ten, we find
second-ranked Texas and third-
ranked Notre Dame, both of which
are idle today..
One game of importance for Big
Ten fans is the one between the
Stanford Indians of Jim Plunkett
and the UCLA Bruins of Dennis
Dummit. This game should be a
powerful determinent of the team
to represent the Pacific Eight in
this year's Michigan-less Rose
B owl1. Eighth-ranked Stanford
(5-1) is now the leading contender
for the conference crown, since
they upset Southern Cal two weeks
ago.
Today's game will be a show-
down between two widely acclaim-
ed quarterbacks. Plunkett, who
last week set an an all-time col-
legiate total offense record, is only
five notches above Dummit in that
category for the season. In passing
percentage, Plunkett leads by only
40 points, .540 to .500. The Bruins
salvaged a 24-21 victory over Cali-
fornia last week when Dummit
scrambled in for a touchdown
with four seconds to play.
Fourth-ranked, unbeaten Ne-
braska faces the task of defendingz
against the Cowboys of Oklahoma
State, a team which has won its
last two games against TCU and
4Houston. The Cornhuskers are
strong favorites in the game. In
last week's 41-20 win over Kan-
. i L e.*;........a}
"J Professional Lei
IN a A

sas, Nebraska came roaring back
from a 20-10 deficit and amassed
515 yards. An 80-yard touchdown
pass from Van Brownson to Guy
Ingles put the Huskers ahead to
stay.
Although it will be a sure win-
ner, many eyes will be on the Ar-
kansas Razorbacks today. They
will be playing a team literally
made of scrubs, but there is a
familiar story connected with it.
The team is Wichita State, which
lost 16 players, its coach and ath-
letic director in that controversial
plane crash three weeks ago. To-
day will be their first game since
that day, and being at half
strength or not, the team will be
facing the ninth-ranked team in
the nation.
Arkansas Coach Frank Broyles
finds himself and his team in a
unique position. "We've never had
to face this type of situation be-
fore," he said. "We called them
and said we'd help them in any

way and if they wanted to cancel
the game we had another op-
ponent lined up. We feel it's an
honor to show the nation that
Arkansas will play the first game
with them since the accident."
Another of the more important
games today features Colorado at
Missouri. Misouri, which was an
early season favorite in the Big
Eight, is now in deep trouble after
losing premier running back Joe
Moore for the season, two weeks
ago while losing, to Nebraska. Last
week, the Tigers took another
trouncing at the hands of Notre
Dame.'
Since stunning the nation by
beating Penn State four weeks
ago, the Buffs have returned back
to earth. They lost a squeaker to
Kansas State, 21-20, destroyed
Iowa State, 61-70, then lost to
Oklahoma.,
Tennessee, ranked 11th this
week, hosts Florida and possibly
the top passing combination in the

country in John Reaves and Car-
los Alvarez. Tennessee has to its
credit a strong defense which has
given up only 12 points in four of
its five games. The other game, a
36-23 beating by sixth-ranked
Auburn, accounts for the Volun-
teers' 4-1 record.
One game that might produce
an upset and gum up the works
in the Pacific Eight is Southern
Cal and Oregon. Oregon, at 4-2,
has already upset UCLA and Cali-
fornia, but lost to Stanford. So
Oregon might well continue its
spoiler role and knock off USC.
If that happened and UCLA
beat Stanford, the Pacific Eight
would be one giant mess of Rose
Bowl bound hopefuls. Stanford,
now 5-1 would be 5-2, as would
be UCLA and Oregon. USC would
be 4-2-1. That would make for
quite a race, and quite a second
game for that November 21 dou-
bleheader: Michigan-Ohio State,
followed by USC-UCLA.

N

Subscribe To
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FUN AND PROFIT:
Minors mean money to majors

7

Conning November 6
Two of the best in one of Michigan's
greatest traditions
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

MEN'S GLEE CLUB
WILLIS PATTERSON, Conductor
and

STANFORD'S ONE-MAN MA-
CHINE Jim Plunkett (16) is
futilly chased by Washington
State lineman Marc Pence (70).
While engineering the Indians
to a 63-16 win and tightening
their grip on a Rose Bowl ticket,
Plunkett shattered the all-time
collegiate total offense record.
00 BLUE !-
Be o Winner
BUY
U of M
SWEATSHIRTS
T-SHIRTS
JACKETS
AT

THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

MEN'S GLEE CLUB

Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L Pct.
Philadelphia 4 1 .800
New York 4 2 .667
Buff' 1 2 .333
Boston 2 4 .333
Central Division
Baltimore 4 1 .800
Atlanta 1 3 .250
Cincinnati 0 3 .000
Cleveland 0 5 .000
Western Conference
Midwestern Division

GB
1/2
2
2
3
3 2

By JIM KEVRA
Back in the 1930's, Branch
Rickey, the general manager of
the St. Louis Cardinals, had a
brilliant idea on how to secure
{ talent for his baseball team.
He entered into a deal with a
number of minor league teams
to give financial aid in return
for sole control over the
team's ballplayers. Historically,
the minor league teams had
ague Standings
Portland vs. San Francisco at Oakland
Detroit at Buffalo
* * * *
ABA
Yesterday's Results
New York 117, Carolina 97
Pittsburgh at.Denver, inc.
Indiana at Texas, inc.
* * * *
NHL
East Division
W L T Pts. GF GA
Boston 4 0 1 9 28 15
New York 4 1 0 8 14 7
Montreal 4 2 0 8 16 10
Detroit 2 5 0 4 19 24
Vancourver 2 5 0 4 18 29
Buffalo 2 4 1 5 10 19
Toronto 1 4 0 2 16 21
West Division
Mhladelphia 4 1 1 9 16 11
hicago 3 2 1 8 22 15
St. Louis 3 1 2 8 18 14
Los Angeles 3 1 0 6 18 12
Minnesota 3 2 0 6 12 9
Pittsburgh 0 3 2 2 6 11
lifornia 0 5 1 1 9 25
Yesterday's Results
Buffalo 4, Detroit 3
St. Louis at Vancouver, Inc.
Pittsburgh at California, Inc.
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Montreal
Chicago at Toronto
' aw York at Minnesota
St. Louis at Los Algeles
Only games scheduled.

WILLIAM OLSON, Conductor

IN JOINT CONCERT

HILL AUDITORIUM-8:00 P.M.

Detroit
Milwaukee
Chicago
Phoenix

6 0 1.000

P 1 1 .500
2 2 .500
1 3 .250
Pacific Division

3
3
4

BLOCK SALES: Oct. 29-30
INDIVIDUAL SALES: Nov. 1-6
TICKET PRICES: $2.00, $2.50, $3.00

MAIL ORDERS:
1024 Ad. Bldg.
Ann Arbor

to

E

Portland 2 1 .667-
Seattle 2 1 .667 -
Los Angeles 2 2 .500
San Diego 3 3 .500
San Francisco 2 3 .400
Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 98, New York 92
E -ston 131, Cincinnati 126
Philadelphia at Los Angeles, inc.
Cleveland at Phoenix, inc.
Portland at Seattle, inc.
Today's Games
Baltimore at Milwaukee
Cincinnati at New York
roston at Atlanta
Piladelphia at San Diego

1

b e e n financially independent
and survived by auctioning their
best players to the major leagues
at the end of each season.
Rickey's plan became ex-
tremely profitable for the major
league operators because it
eliminated expensive b i d d i n g
wars and it became universally
accepted by them. But, it was
the beginning of the end for
the minor league operators as
they were priced out of compe-
tition.
Today, however, with rising
costs, even running minor league
operations has become too ex-
pensive for many owners and
they are being forced to cut-
back their number of farm
clubs. ,Only a few dozen minor
leagues are in operation now as
compared with over 100 leagues
about 50 years ago. Don Lund,
former Director of Player De-
velopment for the Detroit Tigers
and currently the Assistant Di-
rector of Athletics at Michigan,
estimated that the Tigers spent
"about a milion dollars last
year" on their farm system.
THE MAJOR league domina-
tion of the minor leagues turns
into a vicious circle. As the ma-
jors inevest more money into a
team, they assume more control
over the team and can recall the
minor league team's best players
in the middle of the season.
Often, this loses local support
for the team and they make less
money. This forces the majors
to support their farm clubs to
a greater extent and the vicious
circle closes.
4 Lund explained that the Tigers
working agreement with their
farm clubs was a very liberal
one. For a class A farm team
(class A is the third highest
minor league. team), the Tigers
pay all the players salaries
(about $500 per month for each
of the 20 players), provide a.
.set of uniforms, and pay $1500.
The minor league affiliate
must supply one set of uni-
forms, the necessary bats and
balls, and provide the trans-
portation for the teams. They
have sole possession of their
share of the gate receipts.
For a AA farmclub, the minor
league team must pay $150 per
month of their players salaries
and, for a AAA farmclub, they
must pay $450 per month.
To fill the need for more
players, the college baseball pro-
gram has burst into prominence.
Even a dozen years ago, a prom-
ising young baseball player could
only sign a contract and be as-
signed to a minor league team.
Now, however, a young ball-
player has the option of sign-
ing a contract or trying to pick

I,

'M' ruggers

up an education and some
valuable experience in college.
Lund admits that "It's an
individual situation" whether a
high school player should go to
college or try to go directly into
the pros. He adds, "Some just
aren't interested in college.
ONE OF THE problems a col-
lege player faces, however, is
not getting proper coaching.
Lund comments, "You'd be sur-
prised how many pitchers don't
even know how to grip the ball
or stand on the mound prop-
erly."
This is not meant to imply
that college coaches don't know
their baseball but the minor
leagues are far superior in quan-
tity of coaches and the amount
of time spend with a single ball-
player.
Minor league baseball will
never die out completely; but,
its condition may soon approach
that of football with each club
owning only one or two farm-
teams and a few independent
leagues existing through the
coutry. New players will come
solely from college ranks.
And another part of baseball's
tradition will have died.

t

0

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face rugged
Purdue..
For the first time this season,
the Michigan ruggers long home
winning streak may be in danger.
The string, which dates back to
the spring of 1969, will be chal-
lenged today by a rapidly improv-
ing Purdue squad at Palmer Field.
The Blues will try to protect the
string at 10 a.m. while the Golds,
who defeated MSU and Kalamazoo
last weekend play with the roost-
ers at 8:30.
This is Michigan's first meeting
with the Boilermakers as the cur-
rent campaign is only Purdue's
third in big time competition.
Purdue plays a fast, clean, and
skillfull game, as their team is a
disciplined- combination of Hoos-
iers, Irishmen, and Scots.
The Boilermakers orthodox style
will enable the home fans to see
two 'equally-matched and similar
styled teams in action.
Michigan's running attack has
finally jelled and is now playing
as 'a cohesive unit. The improv-
ing play of the backs may make
the difference in the Blue's at-
tempt to keep their long streak
alive.
. 1

4

Judith Crist

A-
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contribution $1.00

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Sun., Oct. 25

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