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October 24, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-24

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Page Tw6

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, Octabo 24, ,197© ,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, October 24, 1970

Margaret Bourke-White
photographs on exhibit

Margaret Bourke-White, war
correspondent-photographer, in-
dustrial photographer, editor
and journalist, will be honored
with an exhibit of .her work at
the Museum of Art, in Alumni
Hall, Oct 7 through Nov. 17.
The exhibit is one of the
events marking the 100th an-

zine. She joined the Life maga-
zine staff in 1936, serving over-
seas as a correspondent-photo-
grapher in World War II and
the Korean War.
The more than 100 photo-
graphs in the exhibit, selected
by Miss Bourke-White for the
occasion, represent all phases

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theatre:

Directing and buildin
a reetr

By LAURIE HARRIS
"The values in a play must
interest everyone in some way,"
says Allen Fletcher, Artistic
Director of the newly formed
Actors Company which premier
ed in Ann Arbor with In the
Matter of J. Robert Oppen-
heimer.
Fletcher is not small; in fact,
he is quite large. But he is un-
assuming and takes his seat
with a gentle caution. He holds
his elbows in tight to his sides
and speaks with a soft, but
trained voice. His large feathery
eyebrows accentuate his words,
and his hands punctuate his
sentences.
Before he speaks it would be
difficult to believe that he was
Artistic Director of the Amer-
ican Shakespeare Festival at
Stratford, Connecticut and is
presently Resident Director of
Ameriea n Conservatory of
Theatre in San Francisco.,
The Actors Company has
branched out into the more
modern field presenting Ann
Arbor audiences with In the
Matter of J.Robert Oppen-
heimer, a contemporary drama
about the ethics behind the de-
velopment of the bomb.
Fletcher believes the theatre
is based on personal experience.
"It has to touch your life in
some way." Oppenheimer, Flet-
cher says, gives the audience a
present day "Everyman." He is
almost superhuman in his
eithical fight against the devel-
opment of the bomb creating a
character with whom everyone
would like to associate.
Plays have to speak to the
director also, says Fletcher, and
Oppenheimer was particularly
challenging. It has a great deal
of meaning, but the play as it
was written by Heinar Kipp-
hardt "has no climax." It is
merely .,a well edited manuscript
from an actual 1954 investiga-
tion. "There are no written
builds so the work must be done
by the directors and the actors."
"This becomes a Ic ore-not
boring, but hard work" says
Fletcher. But the exictement in
a, play of this variety is "the
reality of the material."
Continuing in this vein, the

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niversary of women at the Uni- of her career as a photo-jour-
versity. nalist.
Miss Bourke-White was a stu- She is the author of numer-
dent at Michigan from 1922-24. ous photographic essay books,
She began her career as an in- including three on which she DIAL 8-6416
dustrial photographer in 1927. collaborated with Erskine Cald-
From 1929-33 she was an as- well, during their marriage TW O CLA SSICS
sociate editor of Fortune maga- from 1939-42.
K- .._ ----____--~ -_.____®
SUMMARY OF ACTION TAKEN ciary can give students a fair trial H OLD OVER!
BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT guaranteeing trial by peers and due
COUNCIL AT ITS MEETING process.
OCTOBER 14, 1970 RESOLVED: That SGC calls upon the the e at onship
Approved: That the following be re- Graduate Assembly and the Aackham
Friends of the White Pan in Executive Committee to reject the
cognized as student organizations: findings of the Board of Inquiry and
Friends of the White Panthers, Pente- withdraw their members from it.
costal Students Fellowship Interna- FURTHER RESOLVED: That Jerry
<..tional. De Grieck be delegated to send a let-
Approved: That SGC allocate $30 to ter to those two groups explaining our
New Republican Coalition to be used position, and that he look into other KEN RUSSELLS flm of
for publicity in bringing State Sena- means for SGC to prevent the Board D.HeLAw Nc
tor Huber to the Campus. of Inquiry from proceeding in the Den-
Approved: Allocation of office space ton case.
in the Student Activities Building (at- SGC, Inc. Board of Director's Meet-!
tacked). ing -
Approved: That a letter be sent to thew
-Daily-Jim Judkis Regents notifying them of t h e I r Approved: That Student Government L W
rights of liabilities regarding the dis- Council, Incorporated shall:
cussion of University's business at 1. Request the AttorneyrGeneral of W
secret sessions. . Michigan to ruse on whether the Board
Approved : WHEREAS : The Rackham of Regents' policy of closed meetings Of by Delue n tu~d Artist
Board of Inquiry in the Peter Denton violates the constitution or laws of the
case has decided to recommend to State of Michigan. * and
Graduate Assembly and the Rackham 2. Consult with attorneys to deter-
E:ecutive Committee that the Board mine whether it should bring legisla- THE ACADEMY AARD WW ERI
continue to hear the case; rn tion against the Board of Regents to
WHEREAS: The Board Chas wrongly require them to have their meetings in j'DB1ST PICTUR1
dismissed the two motions for dis- pu
missal presented by Denton;
1) a. Case for dismissal: Rules state
Y 1othat Board of Inquiry must be ap-
pointed at the beginning of the term
and not for and after any given case.
Following the dissolution of b. Board's ruling: Rackham Executive
Committee was merely rectifying anNo
e APA last year, R o b e r t error in not appointing the B!o a r d
'hnitzer and Marcella Cisney, earlier. c. Answer: The rule was made
e Executive and Artistic Di- so that appointments to the tribunal
o the Professional would not be made for a specific case so
tors of ththat those appointments would not be
heatre Program, requested The political in nature. Therefore, the Rack-r- COMING -
ctors Company try to start in ham Executive Committee cannot rec- BERGMAN'S
pn ArbOr. tify their error. OF G AN NA"
2) a. Case for dismissal: C.S.J. has "PASSION OF ANNA"
The Actors Company, ac- jurisdiction in the Denton case, not
rding to Fletcher, is a talent the Rackham Board of Inquiry, b.
ol including about forty ac- Boad's ruling: That it is a political ---_-
)rs from acr'oss the country question that they won't deal with. c.
rs romacrss he ounryAnswer: The students have accepted
cluding the American Conser- CSJ as the legitimate tribunal to try
story of Theatre, the Amer- students for non-academic offenses.
an Shakespearian Festival, Presently, only Central Student Judi-
e APA and the Seattle Reper-
>ry Company. Theatre pro- The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
r age, by students at the University of
ams may request this floating Micnigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
pertory for productions. The Clas postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
Impany has built up a reper- igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Sat.-Sun., Oct. 24-25
i f about forty plays span- Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
ire ss day through Sunday morning Univer-
ng the eras with a tendency to sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
ae modern. carrier, $10 by mai
Buwhat the Actol's Corn- Smmer Session published Tuesday
But through Saturday morning. Subscrip-HE
any will need in the long run, Lion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.
.ys Fletcher is a place to get _________________-
gether for a certain proportion dir. FEDERICO FELL INI (1952)
Fthe year. After about six to 1«
ght weeks together the corn- ..
th cies toughotthreom - Fellini's first film not directed with Lattuada.
any can go on tour perfornming
other cities throughout theds a base in
hich to build up a good r u-IS "Reminds me of Satyricon, but not very
Ation. Tmuch." -Petronius
The Actors Company has M V N H
een admired for its youth;
We don't get many of the OST IT LL 7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
eople who just want to become
ver night stars." The people 662-8871 75c AUDITORIUM
at are interested in working TMOST
ith Fletcher and the Actors
ompany are young actors who UIIAIIE fnU TA

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at Bowen Fieldhouse
Ypsilanti, Mich.
TICKETS: $3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $4.50
AVAILABLE MON., OCTOBER 26, at:
Little Things, Ann Arbor
EMU McKenny Union, Ypsilanti
Ned's Bookstore, Ypsilanti
J.L. Hudson, Detroit

I

MICHIGAN FOOTBALL

4*

on

:_
1

WCBN

650

with

10-

Halt Bass Brian Zemach
Al Wisk
1:00 P.M. SATURDAY
Listen!

company is presently producing
Summertree, the story of a boy
confrontel with the draft and
how the people around him re-
act, and interact. Finally, Jules
Feiffer's Little Murders will be
staged, presenting t h o u g h t s
about crime in present day
suburbia.
Every play, to be a valid pro-
duction, must have a lasting
message. The audience must, at
the same time, be willing to let
the message affect them-"they
must participate in theatre, not
just sit off and judge it," says
Fletcher.
Drama, throughout the coun-
try, has been hit by a drought.
Economic reasons stagnate the
growth of drama in New York.
There is only time and money
for the big long-run musical.
And even that seems to be a
thing of the past. Too many
shows and people have invested
extreme amounts of money only
to fold after four days to the
New York Risk. So actors tend
to look elsewhere-and the Ac-
tors Company is providing an
'elsewhere.'

i l

Daily Classifieds Get Results

are dedicated and truly inter-
ested in learning about the
theatre.
With the new Power Center
for the Performing Arts to be
finished within a year and a fine
repertory company willing to
come to Ann Arbor, there is
only one thing left to complete
the University theatrical world
-student theatre-goers.
Students don't want to sit for
two hours and listen and re-
spond to the established theatre.
They are lectured to in their
classes and they are lectured by
student leaders on the Diag.
Perhaps they can be lectured to
once more-only this time in an
artistic manner, by people who
know how to lecture and deliver
sermons that might be worth
listening to.
- I

flUIVIA1II Ufi I U
HELL WITH IT! -
IT'S THE BEST
AMERICAN FILM
I'VE SEEN THIS
YEAR!" -N.Y.TIMESANY
-VN CENT CANBY,
"IT'S ONE HELL OF A FILM! A
COLD, SAVAGE AND CHILLING
COMEDY! Firmly establishes
Nichols' place in the front rapk
of American directors."
-Bruce Williamson, PLAYBOY
"Viewing Arkin is like watching
Lew Alcindor sink baskets or
Bobby Fischer play chess. A
virtuoso player entering his
richest period! A triumphant
performance!" -TIME MAGAZINE
'CATCH-22' says many things
that need to be said again and
again! Alan Arkin's perform.
ance as Yossarian is great!"
-Joseph Morgenstern, NEWSWEEK

P .

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W ORSHIP

FIRST UNITED
CHURCH AND
FOUNDATION

METHODIST
WESLEY

f

Ann Arbor's 'Summertree,
A Sensitive Production

State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Weslev-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert. Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 and 1 1 :00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Hoover
Rupert: "Burning Questions: Who Is a
Christian?"
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
1 1:00 am, to 12:00 noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sunday, Oct. 25 at 5:30 p.m.-Celebration,
Wesley Lounge; 6:15 p.m.-Dinner, Pine
Room; 7:00 p.m. - P r o g r a m, Wesley
Lounge.
Monday, Oct. 26 at 12:00 noon - Wesley
Foundation Luncheon Discussion with Bart-
lett Beavin - "Christianity and Foreign
Policy," Pine Room.
Thursday, Oct. 29 at 12:00 noon - Wesley
Foundation Luncheon Discussion, "Does the
Church Keep the Poor?," Bartlett Beavin,
Pine Room.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1 432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.-Sermon by
Mr. Gere.

UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
310 S. State St.
Phone 663-4314
Marlyn William White, Minister
Ron Johnson, Associate Minister
11 :00 a.m.-Sunday Service--Ron Johnson.
7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Study and Prover Class
-Mr. White
11:00 a.m. to 12 noon Wednesday-Prayer
and Counseling, also, 12 noon to 1 :00 p.m.
--Healing Service-Mrs. Mattern.
Center open Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Center open at 6:30 p.m.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
Worship Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
"The Price of Compassion," Rev. Terry N.
Smith.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth'Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L, Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00 a.m.
Church School at 9:00 a.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a m.-Testimonv Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room; 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9: Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidavs.
"The Bible Speaks to You," Radio WAAM,
1600. Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 662-0813.

BY LAWRENCE DeVINE
Free Press Drama Critic
The very young are differ-
ent from you and me. They
have more dreams. Then
once in a while, one of them
with love w h e r e his gall
should be writes a play like
"Summertree," a kindly day-
dream about things as maybe
they should have been. "Sum-
thsn about 22 when he wrote
mertree" is by Ron Cowen,
it. In three short acts in the
Actors Company production
at Ann Arbor's Mendelssohn
up as if it were his last.
Theater, his first play stands
A young soldier is dying be-
. _]. ._ . .

AT MENDELSSOHN THEATER

A young actor named Dirk
Benedict gives a pure and
honest performance as the
boy, absolutely free of stage
tricks or sham. In the play-
long flashbok, Benedict is
superb as he suffers the im-
mutable pain of a son trying
to get through to his father.
The father is played by Wil-
liam Myers in a particularly
good performance. Balding a
little, his sensitivity scabbed
by a job like Willy Loman's,
the father is heartbreaking
when he says what his son
imagines he'll say after his
t«. 9 .d - - , 4 ea- r - 1i

In a deft dramatic touch,
the youth's flashbacks include
himself hanging out in his
backyard with himself as a
zhild. The y o u n g e r boy is
played by a red-haired boy of
unfailing appeal who is either
12 years old or a w i z a r d,
named John Clark and he was
wonderful.
The play is born in sym-
pathy, and in a young man's
sensitivity to himself as one
able to give love, to his fat
parents, to his -gentle girl-
friend. The cast is excellent;
director C 1 a y t o n Corzattes
+- ;-- .v + i- h rlrrr I nc

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Corner of Forest and Washtenaw)
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema ,
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship-"The Direc-
tory,"
6:00 p.m.-Discussion of Poverty.
7:15 p.m.-Discussion-Women in Society.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Praver and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheios, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 11:00 a.m.-Worship
Services.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Organization, Supper and Program.

!'

to

P AW.PVRCIIRPINASUA3O05O5FfAltKPCEINil
A MIKE NICHOLS FILM
ALANARKIN42
'
JOSEPH HELI.ER
MARTIN BALSAMRICHARD BENJAMIN ARTHUR GAREUNKEL,

HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
-:15 lacimerWav

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
801 S. Forest

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