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October 23, 1970 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten
TF survey
findings
released
(Continued from Page 1)
week of classroom and outsideI
work cause many teaching fellows
to take only partial course loads.
University Vice President for
Academic Affairs Allen Smith said
last night that many of the griev-;
ances uncovered by the survey
would have to be "dealt with atj
the departmental level."
Commenting on teaching fellow
salaries, he said the money was to
"aid them in their studies" rather,
than to be wages for work.
"Teaching fellows are primarily
students, not teachers," he said.
The TFU was' formed in Octo-
ber 1969, with a goal of bargain-I
ing collectively with the. Univer-C
sity about working conditions. The'
University, however, opposes col-
lective bargaining with the union,
Smith has said.
Grant health awards

THE MICHIGAN GAILY

Friday, October 23, 1970

THE ICHGANDAIL Frday Octber23,197

KENT ACTIVITIES:
Civil Liberties Day'

to protest

YOU don't have to
to love

be Jewish

indictments of demonstrators

ZORBA the GREEK
Quinn's finest and funniest role?

(Continued from Page1) 1 they were witnesses bef
side of the people," several stu- grand jury. In addition,n
dents spoke emotionally about the the faculty is unable to c
need for unity. for the same reason.
"Everyone is looking at us for "All the faculty libera
what they're going to do," said one subpoenaed by the gran
student. "I challenge us to stand said sociology Pro-f. Geral
together." Overall a general mood
"All we hear is unity, unity, and apathy pervades thec
unity," challenged another stu- Students who h a d o
dent. "Then someone says 'I want planned a class strike fo
to do that.' We have so many
segregated parts and not one is
willing to give up its identity."
Most replies came at the end of
the one hour allotted by the ad-
ministration for the meeting, when
a National Student Mobilization
Committee member said, "There's a rrc ii
no reason to go after each other-
it can be. ironed out. All the na--~ii~ec rmPg
tion's students will come together(h
when you call on us. We can get are expected to be chargec
those phony indictments knocked near future.
out." Controversy over the i
The indictments stem from the student funds arose last
findings of a special grand jury when the March grandj
named by the state to investigate panded its investigationi
last May's deaths. The jury re- causes of campus disturba
port exonerated the guard's ac- include allocation of vari
tions, blaming a "permissive, over- dent funds. The grandi
indulgent" administration a n d cured financial records oft
student "troublemakers." versity community and us
While indicting 25 of the pro- during its investigations t
testers, the jury found the Guard out the summer months.
"not subject to criminal prose- Some GSA projects m
cution." in the indictment returned
.n addition, the jury(has with- Case included initial inven
held the names of those indicted a student-run booksto
until arrests are made and issued honorarium for a speaker
injunctions forbidding those whoa Mideast crisis, and paym
took part in the hearings or those a performance by the
indicted to comment on the re- Theater Reperatory.
port. The twelve who have been Under New York state l
notified thus far are not permitted faces a maximum senten

ore the
much of
omment
als were
d jury,"
d Lewis.
of fear
campus.
riginally
or today

were afraid that such a strike
would be cause for invoking a
state law against "disruptions."
Students have also rejected
William Kunstler's offer to coor-
dinate the dissent, afraid that
they won't get a fair trial.
Most students are wary of going
to tomorrow's rally, anxious to
avoid what they think might be
"trouble."

THIS
SUN,, OCT.
AT
SHALOM HOUSE

FILM SHOWINGS
25 7 P.M,9:30 P.M.
(merely 75c)
1429 Hill St.

treasurer

ed at Buffalo

Gay Lib takeover?

Spokesmen for the Gay Liberation F:
their nla tn tkP oer A iP Coli

Five men in the health services to movpian o te theyover ALpAAAC
field have been awarded National -tonove in, vote the county goer
Health Fellowships for advanced with their own officials.
study at the University and the ---
University of Chicago. lUNENFORCEA BLE'-
The fellowships are provided ;"*
under t h e Health Services Re-
search Fellows Program funded s
by the National Center for Health C 1Ol
Services Research and Develop-
ment (NCHSRD) of the U.'S.
health, education, and welfare,
department.
The University and Chicago
were the two universities selected
to participate in the program. (Continued from Page 1 ) (issu
Two of the five fellowships ing college proposal, the Brain be 1
were awarded to Michigan resi- Mistrust (BMT), a radical re- A
dents. Fellows who will study in search organization, presented its the
Ann Arbor are Robert A. DeVries case against corporations that op- pret
administrator, McPherson Com- erate in South Africa. BMT al- the
munity Health Center, Howell, leged that any corporations which Afri
Michigan, and George P. Provost operate in South Africa and fol- BM
deputy executive secretary, Amer- low the South African govern- two
ican Society of Hospital Pharma- ment's apartheid policies are prac- ont
cists, Washington, D.C. ticing discrimination. By allowing T
these corporations to recruit on Ser
Welsh honored. campus, BMT said, the Univer- tha
sity's non-discrimination policy is crui
Prof D aTvid Welsh in the Slavic being volated. ing

ront in Los Angeles describe
ty in California. They plan
nment out, and replace it

d in the'
nisuse of
;t spring
jury ex-3
into the
ances to
ous stu-I
jury se-
the uni-
ed them
hrough-
entioned
d against
ntory for
ire, an
r on the
nent for
Radical
aw, Case
ce of 63
ty on all
denied
e leveled

against him by Samuel Lawn,I
GSA's present treasurer. He fur-
ther charged Lawn with making
the charges for political gain by
making them just prior to this
year's GSA election.
According to Case, a "conflict"
existed between conservative and
radical factions on GSA. "In the
beginning the radical group was
larger but during the strike (last
May) some members of the ex-
ecutive council left. Tom Buchan-
an, for example, went to Cuba at
that time."

HELP
Trick or Treat for UNICEF
General Meeting-Oct. 26, 7:30
RIVE GAUCHE
CORNER HILL & E. UNIVERSITY

#i

1rnttee
Iplan
e was a legal one and should
eft to the courts.
lthough the policy adopted by
OSS Board was a new inter-
tation of the University policy,
specific indictment of South
ica had stemmed from the
T allegations. They had held
meetings and an open hearing
the BMT proposal.
he Engineering P 1 a c e m e n t
vice will continue its policy
t requires each prospective re-
iter to sign an affadavit stat-
his company does not discrimi-
e.

i

1
l
i
7
A
i
7
. t
a

to discuss their case.
These injunctions have not been
lifted despite appeals made to
both state and federal district
courts. The university has made
one appeal on behalf of President
Robert White so that he could
comment on the report. "-he
American Civil Liberties Union
filed one on behalf of those in-
dicted.
Action on these appeals has
been delayed. This leaves iearly
all of the administration inable
to comment on the report because

years in jail if found guil
counts.
Two weeks ago, Case
charges of money misus

_I

t
y
40
s

THE MAN SAYS...
FIC KUP S
ARE
CHEAPER
AT

4i

languages and literatures depart-
ment has received a prize from
the Polish Association of Artists
for his "services to Polish liter-'
ature," including the recent pulb-;
lication by the M.I.T. Press of his
translations of contemporary Pol-1
ish novels. The prize was awarded
during the Second International
Congress of Translators,° which
Welsh attended, held Oct. 1-10 in
Warsaw.

After BMT's brief presentation,
the committee decided that the
-N A
,1 D ET/ A
fi""

nat

- i

TV Turn You Off?
READ A GOOD BOOK FROM:

", , ..__ -may

LITTLE PROFESSOR
BOOK CENTER
Maple Village Shopping Center
(next to Fox Village Theatre)
Open every night til 9:00

CcM

HOCKEY

0

SKATES
STICKS
PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
ALSO LADIES SKATES

662-4110
Largest selection of hardcovers and paperbacks for pleasure read-
ing in Ann Arbor

W~6.*rt.St/
"-R(LD S. TRICK

r

ARE YOU STILL GETTING,
WHAT YOU PAID FOR?
FIND OUT AT OUR
FR EE
AMPLIFIER
CLINIC
OCT. 23&24
Factory engineers will test any make or model am-
plifier and give you a performance graph illustrat-
ing the results.
(Sorry, we won't be able to test tuners)
CLINIC HOURS: Fri. 1-9 P.M., Sat. 10-6 P.M.
Ai-F BUYS
Ann Arbor-East iLansing

4

C

Clothes are a reflection
of linme. Your tithe, your
generation should be
reflected in your wardrobe.
Paraphernalia
is designed,
iian ufactured, wholesaled,
and retailed b'yyour
co17n/eporarwes.

8A* aegaPIZZA
TREAT
1751 PLMOUTH at North Campus
Don't be fooled by the other places so called 'Free' delivery. In these
cases delivery charges are added into the cost of very Pizza so that you pay
for delivery even if you pick up.
Remember! Nothing in this world comes free but at Little CAESARS
we won't charge you for something that you're not getting. So use our coupon
to offset the delivery charge or come by and really save.
If you don't believe that you pay less call the other places and
compare.
75 cents 50 cents
OFF OFF
n oa ;Iona
Sportsman or Partytime ! U Large or Medium
PIZZA PIE PIZZA PIE
at at
little Caesar4 little Caeao4
Expires Oct. 30 * Expires Oct. 30
one coupon per pizza 50 cent delivery charge
Call. 6654116241Compare

sPa phernalia
is your generation

CalleI'2808
write
visit
your
MICHIGAN UNION
530 S. STATE ST.
ANN ARBOR
age 20-24
Your rate will depend on your age!
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

I
I
w
I
S
I~w

{,-1

215 S. State St.

M-F 10-9, S 10-6

I 1

V &.t !..AWF f./ q%.1 Jas 'RI1..AW

z

619 S. MAIN

769-4700

' ,'
( ,

J..L nQaliI Sound Thro iu, I Quality Lquiptnenf"

t,

t

Te4(9
#2i

We want to talk to you
about a career in law.. .
without law school.
When you become a Lawyer's Assistant, you'll
be doing work tradtionally done by lawyers
work we think you'll find challenging and re-
sponsible. And Lawyer's Assistants are now so
critically needed that The Institute for Para-
legal Training can offer you a position in the
city of your choice and a higher salary than
you'd expect as a recent college graduate.
You'll work with lawyers on interesting legal
problems-and the rewards will grow as you do.
A representative of The Institute for Para-
legal Training will conduct interviews on:
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28
Inquire at Placement OfficeI

Il

"RUSH"
TICKETS:
200
at $100 each
(two tickets per
person-no choice
of location)
ON SALE
11:30 to 12:00 AM.
AT THE
Hill Allditnrim I

First American Tour of Australia's Eminent Orchestra
The Melbourne
Symphony Orchestra
Willemn van Otterloo
SAT., OCT. 24 at 8:30
IN HILL AUDITORIUM
United Nations 25th Anniversary Commemorative Program:
Sun Music III.........................Peter Sculthorpe
Four Psyche Fragments.........................Franck

I

f 1

I

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11

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