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October 23, 1970 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-23

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, October 23, 1970

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, October 23, 1970 ~

- --

I

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1215 S. UNIVERSITY

Athlete snubs anthem, causes furor

'1

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By RICK CORNFELD
A high school football player
who refused to take off his hel-
met for the national anthem
has created an uproar in a
Chicago suburb.
Forrest Byram, a senior at
Niles North in Skokie, Ill., w a s
kicked off the team for being
"a disruptive influence", accord-
ing to coach David McCarrell.
A local controversy was
created when Byram attempted
to be reinstated on the team
and the superintendent of the
school district and the school
principal supported him.
The superintendent, Dr. Wes-
ley Gibbs, ordered McCarrell to
take Byram back. The coach re-
fused, jeopardizing his job, and
the public and his fellow coach-
es and teachers rose to his de-
fense.
The controversy raged for a
week and a half, until, because
of threats against his parents,
Byram dropped the case.
Byram first left his helmet on
during the pre-game playing of
the national anthem at t h e
start of last year. But, he said,
"nobody noticed until the next
to last game when somebody
saw it and told the coaches.
"The major factor in my
action was the war, but also the
collusion between big business
and the government," said By-
ram, who could not respect the
anthem of a country whose poli-
cies he finds so objectionable.
Even before that, however,
according to McCarrell, Byram
had been a "disruptive influ-
ence." Frosty, as his friends call
him, did not attend practice on
October 15 because of the Viet-

nam Moratorium. For that "act
of insubordination", McCarrell
said, Byram was not allowed to
dress for the following game.
For all practical purposes,
that did not mean anything, for
Byram was not getting into any
of the games last year any-
way. "I was a tackle and I just
figured the other players were
better than me. We had a pretty
good senior line last year," he
said.
But Frosty did play in the
junior varsity games. When it
came time to receive his letter,
political considerations inter-
fered again.
"At the awards banquet," he
said, "I wore a black armband."
For that the coach decided not

to give Byram the junior var-
sity letter he had earned.
Before the first game this
year on September 19, "he was
warned not to dress for the
game if he could not comply
with the rules," McCarrell said.
Frosty did not comply with
the rules. He left his helmet
on. But he did get into the
game for three plays on the
kickoff team.
The following Monday Fros-
ty was off the team. "T h e y
kicked me off very subtly," he
said. "When I came to prac-
tice Monday, they had chang-
ed the lock on my locker."
For all that, however, Mc-
Carrell maintains that Byram's
keeping his helmet on was not
the reason for his dismissal.
"We felt the perpetual act of
-4

i

insubordination, plus the fact of
the disruptive influence he had
on the team was the reason for
removing him."
The coach used as justifica-
tion a rule in the area coaches'
handbook "that the coach in-
struct players in the proper
behavior toward the national
anthem," the coach said.
"People said I was disrup-
tive," Byram said, "but t h e y
couldn't name one incident
when I was."
The coach said, "I didn't say
this particular act (of leaving
the helmet on) was disruptive.
It was disruptive to the team.
The players felt he should take
it off. These were part of the
team rules."
The other members of the team
wrote a letter to the superin-
tendent supporting the coach.
Ted Phelus, team co-captain
and student council president,
said, "It is a disruptive action
when you break a training rule.
We had voted to leave politics
off the football field.
"Personally, I could ignore it,
but when I say disruptive I mean
a broad thing Discipline is
needed to coach a team. Where
could the coach draw the line?"
If the act of keeping his hel-
met on wasn't the specific rea-.
son for Frosty's dismissal, what
was? What else had Byram done
that was disruptive?
"There were a couple of cases
of fights with other team mem-
bers," the coach said.
Co-captain Phelus denies that.
"It's pretty hard to remove all
friction from the football field,"
he said, "but Frosty wasn't hard
to get along with.
A week after his dismissal
Byram appealed to superinten-
dent Gibbs. Both Dr. Gibbs and
the principal, Dr. Gilbert Weldy,
consulted legal counsel.
Dr. Gibbs said, "I indicated
to the coach that he'd violated
the boy's constitutional rights.
Had he removed him for things
like the player's ability or for
being uncooperative, I would
not have interfered."
Dr. Gibbs put in writing his
request that Byram be rein-
stated. Three days later he re-
ceived McCarrell's refusal. Dr.
Gibbs then demanded that Mc-
Carrell reinstate the player,
threatening to fire him if he
did not.
By this time the matter h a d
become more than just a team
affair. It had become a public
issue.
The newspapers and televis-
ion stations picked up the story,
and, said Dr. Gibbs, "the re-
sponse from the public was over-
whelming. I received more let-
ters on this subject than I ever
had on anything else, almost
all in favor of the coach. From
the letters, you would think I
was a Communist."
The other coaches at Niles
North announced that if Mc-
Carrell was fired, they would
all resign. The coaches at other
high schools in the area an-
nounced that they, too, support-
ed MCarrell, as did the Teach-
er's Union at Niles North.
"In all my 15 years as a high
school principal, I don't believe
I ever took a more unpopular
position," Dr. Weldy said.
But the most hostile attacks
were directed toward Byram, "I
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"They kicked me off very subtly. When I
came to practice Monday, they had changed
the lock on my locker. People said I was dis-
ruptive, but they couldn't name one incident
when I was."
team, he still wanted to be re- however. Many citizens are still
instated. angry over the incident.At the
"I wanted back on the team regular meeting of the Niles
as a matter of principle," he Board of Education this Mon-
said. "Rumor had it that if I day, groups of citizens are ex-
were back on I might just get pected to make statements and
hurt. I didn't think anybody demand that the Board take ac-
would do it. They're basically tion on student rights.
pretty good guys." And what has become of
But finally, mainly because of Frosty Byram? He is now a
threats against his parents, member of the band and plays
Frosty backed down. On Octob- the national anthem before each
er 9, he announced that he had game. "I play it as a piece of
dropped efforts to be reinstat- music", he said. "As a musician,
ed. The school administration I play a piece of music."
Kapp gt $400,000 pact;"
gesSkaff named Tiger coach
By The Associated Press
0 BOSTON - Joe Kapp, the itinerant quarterback with the hel-
ium-filled passes, has a contract with the Boston Patriots that guar-
antees him almost $400,000 over the next three years. The Associated
Press learned yesterday.
Under terms of the contract with the Patriots, who signed him as
a free agent after he played out his option with Minnesota, Kapp will
be paid $130,000 per year over a three-year period on a no-cut pact
that guarantees him the money.
There also is a performance clause that could bring him addi-
tional money, lifting his total package to the $400,000 level.
4 DETROIT - Frank Skaff, who managed the Detroit Tigers for
half the 1966 season, was named first' base coach yesterday to round
out the staff of new manager Billy Martin.
Meanwhile, pitching coach Mike Roarke, then last holdover from
Manager Mayo Smith's staff, was appointed manager of the Tigers'
Toledo farm club of the International League.
* BUENOS AIRES - Oscar Bonavena, the heavyweight con-
tender from Argentina, said yesterday he has signed to meet the win-
ner of the Muhammad Ali-Jerry Quarry fight.
Bonavena, ranked as the No. 1 contender by the World Boxing
Association, said his fight would be held in December. He didn't say
where.
" OXFORD, Miss. - Ole Miss football Coach John Vaught was
reported in good condition and resting comfortably yesterday after
suffering a mild heart attack earlier this week.
A university spokesman said Vaught was in good spirits but
would remain hospitalized for an undetermined period.
He was stricken Tuesday night with a "mild angina attack" and
will miss Saturday's game against Vanderbilt at Nashville, Tenn.

don't care about getting nasty
letters," said Frosty, who re-
ceived eight or nine letters and
15 to 20 phone calls a day at
the peak. "It just bothers me
when people don't sign their
names.
"I think it's ridiculous that it
caused so much trouble."
But even though it was made
quite apparent that almost no-
body wanted him back on the

was disappointed in the affair's
ending.
"The resolution I'd have pre-
ferred " said Dr. Weldy, "was
for the coach and all the play-
ers to have welcomed him back,
but this was not possible. We
ran into a complete wall of re-
sistancs. It began to appear as
if we weren't going to have a
team."
The matter was not dropped

i
41
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Al Wisk

Daily Official Bulletin
(Continued from Page 7)
creation Development of Industrial For-
est Lands, W. Lecture Rm., Rackham,
8:30 a.m.
Edgar A. Kahn Neurosurgical Lecture:
E. Okedu, Nigeria, "Personality of Ni-
gerian Neurology," Dow Aud., Towsley
Center, 2 p.m.
Astronomy Colloquium: M. Stoll,
"High Frequency Flux Densities in
Spectra of Radio Galaxies," P & A
Colloq. Rm., 4 p.m.
6Geography Seminar: Prof. H. Boesch,
U. of Zurich, "Modern Techniques in
Land Use Surveys," 4050 LSA, 4:15 p.m.
International Folk Dance: Barbour
Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Contemporary Music Festival: Con-
temporary Directions Ensemble, the
Stanley Quartet and University Wood-
wind Quintet: Rackham Lecture Hall,
8 p.m.
Professional T h e a t r e Program:
"Summertree," Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, 8 p.m.
Philosophy Lecture: D. Davidson,
Rockefeller U., "Attribution of Atti-

tudes," E. Conference Rm., Rackham,
8 p.m.
Astronomy Visitor's Night: (films)
"A Radio View of the Universe" an d
"Realm of the Galaxies," (to observe)
The Ring Nebul aand the Andromeda
Galaxy: Aud. B, Angell Hall, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Regents' Meeting Nov. 20. Commun-
ications for consideration at this meet-
ing must be in the President's hands
no later than Nov. 5.
Students who expect to receive a
Master's or Professional Degree through
Rackharn, Dec. 1970 should check the
Tentative Degree List in Lobby of Rack-
ham Bldg. If your name is not on list,
see youth Divisional Recorder at once.
Placement Service
3200 S.A.B.
Fletcher School of Law and Diplo-
macy, Cambridge, Miss., representative
will be at Campus Inn, Sat., Oct. 24 in
a.m. Ask for Prof. William Barnes.

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