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October 22, 1970 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-22

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Thurrsday October 22, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven'

Iamm -REFORMS FAIL TO HELP

Corruption,

LUMILO6N II
BETTER LIGHT BETTER SIGHT
STUDY LAMPS
by
LIGHTOLIER
Avoid the eye fatigue from reading and long hours of demanding
work at home or office. Here is engineered lighting to meet the
performance requirements of the Illuminating Engineering Society.
HIGH LEVEL LIGHTING - 200-watt, evenly dif-
fused and glare-free. Approved by Better Light,
Better Sight Bureau. Durable-with washable poly-
propylene shade Height: 22." Diameter: 14."
9800: Bone white 9820: Vivid orange and white
9801: Matte black 9821: Vivid yellow and white
9802: Beige and espresso brown
200-WATT
Price $16.99 BLUB INCLUDED
May be seen on display at Detroit Edison Co.,
401 S. Main St., Ann Arbor
Madison Electric Co.
of ANN ARBOR
2055 W. STADIUM BLVD., ANN ARBOR 48106
Tel. (313) 665-6131

SAIGON (P) - After nearly
10 years of fighting Commun-
ists with massive American aid,
South Vietnam stands in dan-
ger of losing a different war:
The battle against inflation and
corruption.
Dwindling U.S. payrolls as
the big contractors phase out
and Vietnamization continues,
plus the plummeting value of
the plaster raise the threat of
widescale unemployment, a de-
moralized, underpaid army and
lovers
lane

civil service, and ┬░growing dis-
content and disaffection in the
overcrowded cities.
Four years ago, at the peak,
of the U.S. buildup, hundreds of
millions of U.S. dollars were go-
ing down the drain in theft, bri-
bery, waste, black marketeer-
ing and money manipulation.
Since then, the U.S. and
Vietnamese governments have
effectively combined to put the
damper on a number of the
more flagrant opportunities for
smuggling and theft. They have
also reduced diversion of U.S.
goods and PX supplies through
improved security and upgraded
auditing controls, and h a v e
made a sizeable dent in the il-
legal money market by stemming
the flow of GI money orders
and tightening up airport cus-
toms procedures.
But while the overall situa-
tion had improved markedly
from the control standpoint,
corruption in the meantime had
become more sophisticated,
more pervasive as the war sub-

n latio
sided in the countryside a n d
more dangerous because of its
instant effect on the shaky pias-
ter.
Petroleum losses .in the mil-
lions of gallons had developed
into a major scandal, and some
of the older rackets, like hi-
jacking trucks and stealing jeeps
and motorbikes, has passed from
the hands of independent en-
tepreneurs to the machinations
of a "shadow community" of
GIs - deserters and ex-con-
tract employes living in the
slums of Cholon and Saigon.
A study by a team of report-
ers in South Vietnam revealed
these findings:
0 Officials at U.S. commis-
saries acknowledge "account-
ability shortages" totalling about
$35 million over the past three
years. They forecast this year's
loss at about $9 million. That's
only about 2.5 per cent of sales
totaling $441 million, but still
a considerable dollar loss.
* The roads to most major
cities are lined with "bottle

plague S.,

shops" selling black market
gasoline that commercial firms
insist is stolen from military
sources.
With the return of Saigon
port control to the South Viet-
namese, stealing from U.S. ships
unloading cargo is once more on
the rise. As many as 2,000 bags
of rice have disappeared 'from
a single ship, and the Vietnam-
ese government is trying to
make U.S. ship owners pay for
the losses inflicted by Vietnam-
ese stevedores and bargemen.
O In recent months, through
investigations by the understaf-
fed Vietnamese Inspectorate
General, province chiefs h a v e
been removed on charges of cor-
ruption in Pleiku, Chau Dic,
Khanh Hoa, Vinh Dinh a n d
Hau Nghia provinces. A top
American official in the Mekong
Delta points out that none was
ever brought to trial and al-
most all wound up with e q u a
or better jobs.
d Valuable goods still are
stored in the open where they,

are vulnerable to deterioration
and pilferage.
* Four years after it was
dumped in a marshy field near
the village of Phu An, a b o u t
$1.4 million worth of U.S. paid-
for steel is rusting away while
U.S. government and congres-
sional investigators check on a
potential scandal involving a
new contract to dispose of the
steel.
* U.S. military and civilian
advisors in the field complain
that the Village Development
Fund, which makes up to a
million piasters in public works
available to hamlets and vil-
lages setting up local govern-
ment, has become "a license to
steal," especially in Montag-
nard areas where Vietnamese
officials disregard the desires
of the people to build their own
pet projects.
O American officers, oversee-
ing measures to improve the lot
of Vietnamese militiamen, re-
port that U.S. supplied tin roof-
ing and cement intended for
new housing seems to disappear
somewhere in the South Viet-
namese government chain.
Sometimes only forlorn, weath-
er-beaten wooden frames a r e
erected '- and remain unfin-
ished.
0 Vietnamese sources say

families can arrange to have
their men transferred from
dangerous or far-away posts
for a minimum of 50,000 piast-
ers ($420 legal rate, $140 black-
market) and as much as 300,-
000. The soldier is shifted on
paper to a unit near Saigon,
never spends time with his unit,
is given leave papers so that
he can remain home and even
work. His unit commander pock-
ets his paycheck: This sort of
practice raises questions about
the validity of figures on the
size of the South Vietnamese
army.
0 A top U.S. official in the
Mekong Delta states flatly that
"ghost payrolls" for national
police, regional and popular
forces are lining the pockets of
any number of corrupt district
and province officials, again.
with Uncle Sam underwriting
the cost.
Daily Official Bulletin
(Continued from Page 6)
seling psychology, student personnel
work in hig rheeduc. and rel. fields
such as guidance, educ., admin., and
adult educ.
Experiment in International Living,
private, non-profit, educational in-
stitution deeply involved in interna-
tional educ. exchange programs. Three
undergrad programs, three grad. level
programs. Info at Career Planning.

Vietnam

THIN K SNOW!

Rossignol Ski Package
Rossignol Concorde fiber glass skis (1 year
unconditional -guarantee); Koflock 5 buckle
plastic boots; Tyrolia or Cubco bindings; Barre-
crafter aluminum poles; all installed and safety
checked for only
$159.95

Krystal Ltd Ski Package
Krystal Wood skis (1 year unconditional guar-
antee); Koflock 5 buckle plastic boots; Tyrolia
or Cubco bindings; Barrecrafter alumqinum
poles; all installed and safety checked for only
$95

"STUDENT ACTIVISM IN THE
THIRD WORLD"
Speaker: HIRO ANDO, Grad student in Politi-
cal Science will discuss the Philippines move-
ment
Response: VENOGOPAL NOTT, India
NOON LUNCH-DISCUSSION, THURS., OCT. 22

Spalding G.S. fiber glass skis
VERY LIMITED QUANTITIES
200 cm only regularly $180
Now Only $89.95
2 year unconditional quorantee,
2455 S. STATE ST.

ECUMENICAL CAMPUS
921 CHURCH STREET

CENTER

'-

Ir

GUILD HOUSE

802 Monroe

A

I

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22

AUDITORIUM A, ANGELL HALL

4:00 p.m.

JAJW,
SWANK INC.-Sole Distributor

"THE FUTURE OF JEWISH-CHRISTIAN RELATIONS: A BACKWARD VIEW"
PROFESSOR NOEL FREEDMAN, coming
to the University of Michigan next year as
Coordinator of Studies in Religion to work
for expanded offerings in the area of Re-
ligious Studies and raise money for a pro-
jected Institute for Studies in Religion;
|t Mcurrently Director, American School of
currently Director, American School of
Oriental Research in Jerusalem and Dean
at San Francisco Theological Seminary.
Also served as Professor of Old Testament
at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and
as Editor in Chief of the Anchor Bible
Commentary.
SPONSOR: Dept. of Near Eastern Languages and Literature

Friday, Oct. 23-NOON LUNCHEON 35c
"CANADIAN SEPARATIST ISSUES"
EDWARD RATUSHNY, Law Schobl:
formerly exec. assist. to Canadian minister
of manpower, Otto Lang
FRIDAY EVENING-6 P.M.
EXOTIC DINNER-(prepared by Napolese student)
Cost $1.10
for reservations call 662-5 189 by Friday noon
Shirley Lewis-Ecumeniral Center
return from Iran
"REFLECTION ON STUDENT ISSUE IN ASIA MINOR"

Back in the early 1900's the Arrow
collar Man was the wildest man about
town . . . the girls swooned over his
great looks and his suaveness. He had
more marriage proposals than any
matinee movie idol. . . and often went
boating with his favorite "heartthrob"
Mabel Normand. The artist, J. C.
Leyendecker, created this fictional hero
and his admired features.
What are the bright, way-out, up-
tight words they're using?
Just send us your deathless (deadly?)
prose - and we'll send you this
22" x 28', full-color poster of the
Arrow' Collar Man. Simply write a
caption, fill in your name and address,
post it (that's Arrow's way of saying
mail it in) and the full-size poster will
be sent to you by return mail
They might have said: "Are you sure
this is the way to Woodstock?l?' -
or, "I thought the Titanic was unsink-
ablell!" What do you think?
If you have a real mercenary streak,
send in several entries - the odds are

OFFICIAL CONTEST RULES
I-On an official entry blank, (or
paper) write your name and address
and fill in a caption.
2. Mail your completed entry to "The
Man," P.O. Bo .1, Blair, Nebraska
68008.
3. Entries must 'be postmarked by mid-
night November 30, 1970 and received
by December 10, 1970.
4. Best caption wins a two-bedrooni
ski chalet or beach house which will be
selected by The Arrow Company, and
will be erectedoat a site within conti-
nental United States chosen, by the
winner. The Arrow Company will pro-
vide up to $5,000 to pay site and
installation costs.
5. Entries will beijudged by the D. L
Blair Corporation, an independent
judging organization on the basis of
(a) humor (b) originality (c) interest.
6. Contest open only to college stu-
dents. Decision of the judges is final.

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