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October 22, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

F

UNION BILLIARDS

I

REDUCED RATES
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1 P.M.-6 P.M. Sunday

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By The Associated Press

afire

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Thursday, October 22, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michgan

Page Three I

Page Three

FREE BILLIARDS INSTRUCTIONS
SATURDAY, OCT. 31 -10 A.M.-NOON

PREMIER GOLDA MEIR yesterday announced that Israel
is prepared to continue indefinitely the Israel-Egyptian cease-
fire.
But Meir rules out any return to peace talks until Egypt moves
back Soviet-built missile sites in the Suez Canal zone. The U.S. has
joined Israel in charging that Egypt violated the standstill by ad-
vancing the missile sites.
However, Egypt has given assurances that it would extend the
cease-fire beyond the dead-line, though it will not move back the
missiles.

Mitchell leaves trial
S. Sgt. David Mitchell, who is being tried in connection with the alleged massacre of
Vietnamese civilians at My Lai in March, 1968, leaves the courtroom yesterday. The
trial was adjourned for 24 hours to enable the defense to organize its presentation.
'GREEN REVOLUTION'
Nobel Peace Prize given
to Iowa wheat scientist

White House
denies, rumor
on cease-fire
By The Associated Press
The White House yesterday denied
rumors that the United States would
declare a unilateral cease-fire in Viet-
nam.
Saigon newspapers reported yesterday
President Thieu of South Vietnam had al-
ready instructed all provincial governors
and mayors to provide maximum protection
in their areas in case of a cease-fire.
Informed sources said that Thie's in-
structions were to eliminate the possibility
that Viet Cong or their sympathizers might
try to claim land that was under their
control after the cease-fire.
Thieu has also summoned his military
and political leaders to a weekend cjo n-
ference which will reportedly discuss t h e
Nixon peace plan and the cease-fire ques-
tion.
A one-sided truce would appear to be an
extension of President Nixon's peace prt-
posal made Oct. 7. Among other things,
Nixon proposed a cease-fire proclaimed
by both sides, but North Vietnam and the
Viet Cong rejected the proposal.
Presidential Press Secretary Ron Ziegler
said, "We have no announcement beyond
the ones we have already made on Viet-
nam."
A U.S. military spokesman said he heard
nothing about a cease-fire and added that
U.S. Command "is continuing normal oper-
ation."
Ziegler also said that the United States
believes that negotiation "is the quickest
way to gain a peace in Vietnam and Indo-
china and that is the path we are pursu-
ing."

OSLO, Norway (R)-The Nobel Peace Prize
was awarded yesterday to Iowa-born Nor--
man Ernest Borlaug, a quiet scientist who
has made harvests more bountiful in hungry
countries.
Borlaug is an agricultural expert who
helped develop better-yielding g r a i n s
through the "Green Revolution."
The term refers to the use of improved
wheat and rice strains, and more efficient
use of fertilizer and irrigation, to produce
larger crops.
Borlaug, 65, is a director of the Rocke-
feller Foundation and heads a team of
scientists from 17 nations who are experi-
menting with new types of grains at the
Rockefeller Agricultural Institute in Mexico.
For nearly 25 years, the U.S. Department
of Agriculture says, Borlaug has pioneered
in breeding new varieties of disease-resis-
tant wheat plants that develop less straw
and more grain. Variations of his semidwarf
Mexican wheat have been sucessful in Asia,
South America, Africa and the Middle East.
Not everyone regards the Green Revolu-
tion as a complete success, however. Experts
in Pakistan and India have said the new
wheat requires more water, resulting in
cultivation of fewer acres, and'that people
in some cases prefer the taste of food made
from older varieties.
The Peace Prize is awarded by a five-
member committee of the Storting, Norway's
parliament. It said Borlaug was a central

figure in research looking to better feeding
in undeveloped countries through the Green
Revolution.
When told of his award, Borlaug quipped,
"Somebody must have made a mistake."
Then, growing serious, he added:
"This is an award to a team, not to me
personally. What I have done I have done
with a group of young, dedicated scientists
from more than 25 countries."

Living costs rise sharply;
workers' weekly pay drops

WASHINGTON (P) - Living costs ad-
vanced more swiftly last month and the
purchasing power of millions of workers
showed the biggest annual drop in more
than six years, the government said yester-
day.
The September price rise pushed the gov-
ernment's Consumer Price Index up to 136.6,
meaning every $10 worth of goodsand ser-
vices in the 1957-59 base period cost $13.36
last month.
Higher costs of clothing, housing and con-
sumer services made up most of the rise.
The report by the Bureau of Labor Sta-
tistics also said weekly pay of some 45 mil-
lion rank-and-file workers dropped 84 cents

to $121.36 because of a half-hour drop in
the work week.
The price rise of four-tenths of one per
cent and the cut-in workers' earnings and
buying power sparked anew the political de-
bate over whether President Nixon's anti-
inflation policies are working.
The September rise in living costs of four-
tenths of one per cent was double the two-
tenths rise in August that Paul McCracken,
chairman of President Nixon's Council of
Economic Advisers, hailed as the best news
yet in Nixon's battle against inflation.p,
McCracken said after yesterday's report

that "we
this. The
are in the

certainly are not discouraged by
basic movements in the economy
right direction."

F-,- --

are in theright direction."

Every MONDAY:
Football Night, color TV
happy hour prices
Every TUESDAY:
Apple Wine Night-reduced prices
Bluegrass entertainment
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 21
BLUES NIGHT with
Bob Golenthal's Blues Band
THURSDAY, OCT. 22
LEAVES OF GRASS
9:30-1 :30-Women half prices
FRIDAY, OCT. 23
LEAVES OF GRASS
9:30-1 :30
SATURDAY, OCT. 24
LEAVES OF GRASS
9:30-1:30
HAPPY HOUR 5-7-reduced prices

the place to meet
I NTERESTI NG people
BACH CLUB
presents
GAMES OF CHANCE
IN THE 18th CENTURY:
Shortcuts for Kapitalmeisters
by Sterling Murray
Bachelor of Music, MA in Mus. Lit.
Teaching Fellow
THURS., OCT. 22, 8 P.M.
S. QUAD-WEST LOUNGE
REFRESHMENTS
Everyone welcome (No musical
knowledge needed). Info: 663-
2827, 769-2003, 663-9619

FOLK DANCE
WORKSHOP
Yves Moreau, nationally
reknown teacher-dancer
just returned from Bul-
garia, teaching
BARBOUR GYM'
Friday, Oct. 23
1:30 P.M. $1.25

11

-

"Remember Your Brothers & Sisters"
PRAY, MARCH, and DANCE
WITH SOVIET JEWRY DURING ITS
NIGHT OF AWAKENING ON
SIMCHAS TORAH
Brief service-Candlelight March to Diag-Is-
raeli Folk-Dancing on Diog
Thurs., Oct. 22-8 p.m. sharp
at SHALOM HOUSE
1429 HILL-663-4129

U

-DO IT

--DO'T
HOMECOMING CONCERTSI

THURS., OCT. 22:

STEVE MILLER BAND
and

II

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