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October 20, 1970 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-20

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 20, 1970

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY
-

I

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(Four Week Seminar Series)
An introductory attempt to understand the problems of America's
homosexual minority from the points of view of sociology, psy-
chology, law, and theology. Special attention will be given to the
Model Penal Code, the Wolfenden, Quaker, and Hooker reports,
and to the homophile civil rights movement. Discussions will raise
the question: what might an enlightened religious viewpiont and
public policy be?
Although the seminar is open to all interested persons, attendance
will be limited to 25. To enroll, please phone or contact in person
the Office of Religious Affairs. An outline, biblggraphy, and se-
lected papers for discussion will be distributed at the first session
on-October 22 at 7 P.M. at the Guild House. All sessions will be
led by Lloyd Putnam, ORA Educational Director.
THURSDAYS: Oct. 22 and 29; Nov. 5 and 12
GUILD HOUSE-802 Monroe Street
7 P.M.

Sponsored by: The Office of-Religious Affairs4
2282 S.A.B. 764-7442
Join The Daily Today!

ATTENTION:
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN FRESHMEN & SOPHOMORES!!
THE DEARBORN CAMPUS OF U-M
WOULD LIKE TO MEET YOU
WHEN: EACH THURSDAY WHERE: 1213 ANGELL HALL
9 A.M.-12:00 COUNSELING OFFICE
WHY: TO TELL YOU ABOUT UM-D UND ERGRADUATE LEVEL PROGRAMS IN:
1. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
2. ENGINEERING-ELECTRICAL, MECHANICAL, INDUSTRIAL, & ENGINEERING MATH
3. LIBERAL ARTS
4. ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION

By BETSY MAHON
With the Big Ten season only
two weeks old, speculation has al-
ready begun over which lu c k y
team will w i n the all expenses
paid Christmas vacation in Pasa-
dena. At this early stage t h r e e
teams are sitting undefeated on
top of the pile. Michigan is, of
course, ineligible for a return trip
to the Rose Bowl, which leaves
Ohio State to contend with un-
likely Northwestern for the hon-
or.
THE BUCKEYES, to the sur-
prise of no one, creamed the Gold-
en Gophers of Minnesota 28-8.
Gopher coach Murray Warmath
went into the game with an open
mind regarding the Bucks' invin-
cibility, but afterwards was forc-
ed to conclude, "You sort of won-
der if they are number one when
you come in here, but they are.
We couldn't get the ball away
from them in the first half."
As Warmath so aptly pointed
out, the game was all Ohio State
for the first thirty minutes. The
Buckeyes scored the first three
times they got the ball and by the
time homecoming festivities start-
ed at halftime, they were leading
28-0.
However, in the last part of the
contest Minnesota managed to
builda defensive wall and did not
let the powerful Bucks move past
the Gopher 26 yard line. The Go-
phers put themselves on the score-
board in the fourth quarter with
a touchdown and two point con-
version.
DESPITE the lopsidedness of
the score, other statistics tell a
different story. Both teams had
26 first downs and the yardage to-
tals were fairly close. Ohio State
gained 396 yards rushing and 74
yards passing for a total of 470
yards, while the Gophers picked
up 308 yards in the air against the
touted Buckeye defense and added
70 yards on the ground for 378
Iyards.
The offensive unit, which had
caused Coach Woody Hayes some
worry during the week, reached
its usual high standards, at least
in the first half. Quarterback Rex
Kern completed 9 out of 15 passes
for 73 yards and scored two touch-
downs on runs of seven and ten
yards. He was named Ohio State's
"Back of the Game."
Fullback J o h n Brockington
gained 118 yards in nine carries
and scored two touchdowns in the
first quarter. He finished up with
187 yards and was t h e game's
leading rusher. However, only 26
of those yards came in the second
half, a tribute to the Gopher de-
fense.

HAYES summed up the Buck-
eyes' performance by saying, "I
don't think we can play any bet-
ter than we did in the first quar-
ter." He explains his team's fail-
ure to move the ball in the sec-
ond half, commenting "Maybe we
were a little tired. It's hard to
keep a tempo like we had in the
first half."
Up at Madison, the Northwest-
ern Wildcats, who were 0-3 going
into Big Ten play, achieved their
second straight conference victory
by dumping the Wisconsin Bad-
gers 24-14. For the second year in
a row the Wildcats had a winless
pre-conference season and then
won their first two conference
games handily, to share at least
temporarily in the Big Ten lead.
Northwestern took a 10-0 lead
in the second quarter on a pass
from Maurie Daigneau to Barry
Pearson and a thirty yard field
goal. The Badgers scored a touch-
down in the second quarter and
tallied again in the last seconds
to take a 14-10 lead.
The Wildcat defense held the
Badgers to five plays in the third
quarter, intercepted one of their
passes and caused two fumbles.
The offense picked up after this
performance and forced over two
touchdowns in the last quarter
for the victory.

I,

-Associated Press
NORTHWESTERN'S MIKE ADAMLE (34) topples over the line
for a first down in the Wildcats' 24-14 win over Wisconsin. Sur-
prising Northwestern now owns a share of first place in the Big
Ten at 2-0, along with Ohio State and our beloved Blue.

BOOT NORTHERN TOLEDO:
Soccermen get Sunday kicks

By RANDY PHILLIPS
Despite a last minute change of
venue, the Wolverine soccer team
pushed its Toledo League record
to 3-1 Sunday with a somewhat
lethargic 4-2 victory over the
Northern Toledo team,
This weekend's match-up was a
very subdued affair in contrast
with last week's tough and high-
tempered game against the Ar-
senal.
THE NORTHERN TOLEDO
team took quick advantage of its
home field edge by striking early
in the first half. The tally came
on a free kick from Just outside
the Michigan goal area. Toledo's
shot eluded Wolverine goalie Karl
Krotki, but the play was protest-
ed. According to Michigan cap-
tain Miguel Taube, th e referee
had not allowed his team enough
time to set up a wall to protect
the goal. But the protest was dis-
counted anti the goal gaveN.T.O.T.
a temporary 1-0 lead.

i
1

_________I

Michigan came right back and
scored a few minutes later as Tai-,
yab Khan placed a fine long shot
into the Toledo net'from his mid-
field position.
The W6lverines kept the pres-
sure on as they took the lead on
a goal by George Schuder. This
second score for the blue-c 1 a d
booters came with only 20 min-
utes gone in the match.
The action then settled down,
with Michigan holding a 2-1 lead
and neither team able to pent-
trate its opponent's defense.
THE SECOND HALF was prac-
tically an instant replay of the
first as, Toledo again struck early
to tie the game at 2-2. A poor play
by the Michigan defensive backs
allowed a N.T.O.T. forward to slip
through for the score.
After that mishap the Wolver-
ine defensemen tightened up and
kept Toledo scoring opportunities
down to a minimum. Michigan's
offense then took control and re-
peated the rapid goal outburst of
the opening half.
JEAN GILLES centered a pass
beating two Toledo players to the
ball, but one of th e defenders
handed the ball in desperation,
paving the w a y for a Michigan
penalty shot. Daniel Boyle booted
the shot through to retain the
lead.
Just minutes later Schuder
again scored as he kicked a Gilles
rebound past the out-of-position
N.T.O.T. goalie.
Another Michigan score nearly
followed as Schuder again beat
two Toledo defenders from his
left wing position, but was faulted
on the play. The ensuing penalty
shot was kicked wide, but the two-
goal lead remained safe in face
of the tenacious Wolverine de-
fense.
Taube was not happy with his
team's play, saying, "It was a bad
game, not nearly as good as last
Sunday's (against Arsenal). In
r -

the first half we had several op-
portunities to score; but we didn't
make them."
Taube's main criticism was that
the team did not play as a cohes-
ive unit. Co-operation on passes
and rushes was far below par.
Despite the team's p oor per-
formance they did manage to win
their third straight conference
game. In addition Taube singled
out the play of Boyle and Schuder
as exceptional. Boyle consistently
foiled N.T.O.T. rushes as fullback
as well as helping out the offense
at midfield an~d scoring on a pen-
alty shot. Schuder had two goals
and a near miss as he befuddled
the Toledo backs with his ball
control.
Blue fifth
in AP pollM
Michigan's football team rose to
fifth place in this week's Associat-
ed Press poll on the strength of
their 34-20 victory over Michigan
State, coupled with Mississippi's
30-14 loss to a surprising South-
ern Mississippi team. The loss sent
the Rebels tumbling from 4th to
13th place.
; Ohio State (19) 4-0 668
2. Texas (9) 4-0 630
3. Notre Dame (4) 5-0 585
4. Nebraska (1) 5-0-1 477
5. Michigan (1) 5-0 387
6. Auburn (1) 5-0 355
7. Air Force (1) 6-0 354
8. stanford 6-1 316
9. Arkansas 4-1 224
10. So. California 4-1-1 184
11. Tennessee 4-1 153
12. Arizona state 5-- 147
13. Mississippi 4-1 140
14. Louisiana State 4-1 73
15. Houston 3-1 48
16. UCLA 4-2 26
17. San Diego State 6-0 16
18. Pittsburgh 4-1 10
19. Colorado (Tie) 3-2 8
Toledo (Tie) 6-0 8
Others receiving votes, listed al-
phabetically: Dartmouth, Florida, Mis-
souri, Northwestern, Oklahoma, Ore-
gon, Southern Mississippi, Syracuse,
Tulane, Yale.

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. .. So Is NICE
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BOOK SALE
EVERYTHING IN STORE REDUCED
20% OFF LIST ON NEW
50% OFF LIST ON USED
Come in and browse.
Get required books for the rest of the term
Sale lasts until October 23
STUDGNT 00K SQRVICG
1215 S. UNIVERSITY

FOR ALL AGES-COME AS YOU ARE-0 PEN'TIL 2 A.M., 7 DAYS A WEEK
HOT DOG STEAMED IN A45cCORN-FED RATH USDA CHOICE ROAST 85c
BEER WITH SAUERKRAUT 45 BEEF ON OUR OWN EGG BUN C
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